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62champ
03-07-2008, 07:22 AM
Caught this photo while doing research for my history classes. Found on the Library of Congress website (http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/fsahtml/fahome.html) - have over 160,000 photos on file from the Great Depression.

Caption states these are migrant farm workers travelling through North Carolina to New Jersey for the potatoe havesting season.

http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8c02000/8c02700/8c02718r.jpg

I have seen other Studebakers in other photos on that website, but not this obvious. 1934 'Year Ahaead' model or 1935?

<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

8E45E
03-07-2008, 07:56 AM
quote:Originally posted by 62champ
Caption states these are migrant farm workers travelling through North Carolina to New Jersey for the potatoe havesting season.

I have seen other Studebakers in other photos, but not this obvious. 1934 'Year Ahaead' model or 1935?



Does it have a date of when that photo was taken? What is rather alarming is how dilapidated that car is![xx(] Remember, it would have been only a few years old in the Great Depression, and it must have been horrendously abused since 'day one'.[V]

Craig

8E45E
03-07-2008, 07:56 AM
quote:Originally posted by 62champ
Caption states these are migrant farm workers travelling through North Carolina to New Jersey for the potatoe havesting season.

I have seen other Studebakers in other photos, but not this obvious. 1934 'Year Ahaead' model or 1935?



Does it have a date of when that photo was taken? What is rather alarming is how dilapidated that car is![xx(] Remember, it would have been only a few years old in the Great Depression, and it must have been horrendously abused since 'day one'.[V]

Craig

Avantidon
03-07-2008, 08:29 AM
Pat, give me a call and I'll look it up for you. DJ

Avantidon
03-07-2008, 08:29 AM
Pat, give me a call and I'll look it up for you. DJ

62champ
03-07-2008, 09:06 AM
quote:Does it have a date of when that photo was taken? What is rather alarming is how dilapidated that car is![xx(] Remember, it would have been only a few years old in the Great Depression, and it must have been horrendously abused since 'day one'.[V]

Craig


Info says it was 1940.

<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

62champ
03-07-2008, 09:06 AM
quote:Does it have a date of when that photo was taken? What is rather alarming is how dilapidated that car is![xx(] Remember, it would have been only a few years old in the Great Depression, and it must have been horrendously abused since 'day one'.[V]

Craig


Info says it was 1940.

<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 10:04 AM
:) Interesting photo...and conversation/subsequent posts.

We tend to forget how soon cars used to wear out, because, today, it's not unusual to see 20-year-old cars in daily service, even in rust-belt locales.

To wit: In Spring, 1963, I bought my first Studebaker: a one-owner 1955 Champion Regal Coupe. Mind you, this car was only 8 years old. But the original woman owner had used it normally. At just under 80,000 miles, it was worn and rusted to the point where it sat forlorn behind the gas station where she traded in the Indianapolis-contained "suburb" of Broad Ripple.

She had called the man who sold it to her new, my friend John Knapp at Snider Studebaker, to see what she might do with it. He took me up to see it and brokered the deal where I was able to buy it from her for $75. A new battery had it running to drive home and "restore."

But, again, it was only eight years old at the time! [:0] We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 10:04 AM
:) Interesting photo...and conversation/subsequent posts.

We tend to forget how soon cars used to wear out, because, today, it's not unusual to see 20-year-old cars in daily service, even in rust-belt locales.

To wit: In Spring, 1963, I bought my first Studebaker: a one-owner 1955 Champion Regal Coupe. Mind you, this car was only 8 years old. But the original woman owner had used it normally. At just under 80,000 miles, it was worn and rusted to the point where it sat forlorn behind the gas station where she traded in the Indianapolis-contained "suburb" of Broad Ripple.

She had called the man who sold it to her new, my friend John Knapp at Snider Studebaker, to see what she might do with it. He took me up to see it and brokered the deal where I was able to buy it from her for $75. A new battery had it running to drive home and "restore."

But, again, it was only eight years old at the time! [:0] We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP

62champ
03-07-2008, 10:52 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:)
But, again, it was only eight years old at the time! [:0] We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP


Well said Bob. A month of so ago I looked through an artilce that stated the average age of a vehicle in the US today is just over 9 years - oldest it has ever been.

Your story is similar to my father's first Studebaker.

In 1961, he saw a '53 Starlight (V8 and 3sp/OD) sitting behind the local Chevy dealership with its front end in the air. Asked the dealer about it and they said it was a trade in. Reason it looked so funny is that the engine was in pieces in the trunk - someone had taken it apart for a rebuild and with 100K on the clock, found out it was too much work.

When dad asked the dealer what he wanted for it, the guy asked him how much money he had on him. He was able to fish out $23 and some change and the car was his.

He still owns the car today and although it was take out of daily service in 1988, it still racked up 370,000 miles.

<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

62champ
03-07-2008, 10:52 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:)
But, again, it was only eight years old at the time! [:0] We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP


Well said Bob. A month of so ago I looked through an artilce that stated the average age of a vehicle in the US today is just over 9 years - oldest it has ever been.

Your story is similar to my father's first Studebaker.

In 1961, he saw a '53 Starlight (V8 and 3sp/OD) sitting behind the local Chevy dealership with its front end in the air. Asked the dealer about it and they said it was a trade in. Reason it looked so funny is that the engine was in pieces in the trunk - someone had taken it apart for a rebuild and with 100K on the clock, found out it was too much work.

When dad asked the dealer what he wanted for it, the guy asked him how much money he had on him. He was able to fish out $23 and some change and the car was his.

He still owns the car today and although it was take out of daily service in 1988, it still racked up 370,000 miles.

<div align="left">1960 Lark VI</div id="left"> <div align="right">1962 7E7-122</div id="right">
[img=left]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/8b0ac4c6.jpg[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/DSC02237.jpg[/img=right]

MikeW
03-07-2008, 11:14 AM
My first car was a 1948 LC that I paid $95 for. It was 7 years old and in pretty good shape. I drove it a year and sold it for $95. Then I bought a 1954 Champion for $200. It was low mileage and only two years old. Cars were throw aways back then. No one seldom kept one more then three years.

Mike
www.packardhawk.com

MikeW
03-07-2008, 11:14 AM
My first car was a 1948 LC that I paid $95 for. It was 7 years old and in pretty good shape. I drove it a year and sold it for $95. Then I bought a 1954 Champion for $200. It was low mileage and only two years old. Cars were throw aways back then. No one seldom kept one more then three years.

Mike
www.packardhawk.com

lstude
03-07-2008, 12:01 PM
The first Studebaker I bought was a 53 Commander hardtop. This was in 1961 and it was 8 years old. I paid $75.00 for it. I was taking friends for a ride and my sister was sitting in the back seat. She had on high heels and the heel of her shoe went right through the floor well! It had rust in all the usual places.

I have some depression (or poverty) pictures. This one was probably taken in the 40s of a guy working on a beat up Studebaker.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/ManworkingonStudebakersm.jpg

The next one is from the cover of the 1932 Motor magazine. It captures the feeling about the depression. This poor guy dressed up as Santa, had just made a lot of kids happy at the Church, but now his car has broken down and he has no money and they won't give him credit.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/Motormagazine1932coversm.jpg

The next one is 1940s or 50s poverty. This picture was taken at a piece of land that I bought in the 70s. This poor old grandma just says poverty to me. Standing by her shack with her little dog and Easter basket. Probably had no running water as you can see the old well. At least she had her Ford!

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/GrandmawithEasterbasketbyFordsm.jpg





Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/MeatSouthBendsm1.jpg

lstude
03-07-2008, 12:01 PM
The first Studebaker I bought was a 53 Commander hardtop. This was in 1961 and it was 8 years old. I paid $75.00 for it. I was taking friends for a ride and my sister was sitting in the back seat. She had on high heels and the heel of her shoe went right through the floor well! It had rust in all the usual places.

I have some depression (or poverty) pictures. This one was probably taken in the 40s of a guy working on a beat up Studebaker.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/ManworkingonStudebakersm.jpg

The next one is from the cover of the 1932 Motor magazine. It captures the feeling about the depression. This poor guy dressed up as Santa, had just made a lot of kids happy at the Church, but now his car has broken down and he has no money and they won't give him credit.

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/Motormagazine1932coversm.jpg

The next one is 1940s or 50s poverty. This picture was taken at a piece of land that I bought in the 70s. This poor old grandma just says poverty to me. Standing by her shack with her little dog and Easter basket. Probably had no running water as you can see the old well. At least she had her Ford!

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/GrandmawithEasterbasketbyFordsm.jpg





Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/MeatSouthBendsm1.jpg

Avantidon
03-07-2008, 12:50 PM
The first one I bought was 56 E12 P/U. Iwas an insurance agent and one day one of my insureds walked into my office asked me if i knew anyone who would be interested in a Studebaker truck. I said i woud as i knew he had one. He told me his grandson whom he had given the truck too did not want it. i bought it and my kids dorve it to school and to work everyday for over five years. They loved it and I loved it. We lived in a small PA town of 14K and all knew whose truck it was so I had no problem knowing where my kids were and they loved it because it was different.

See you in the future as I write about our past

Avantidon
03-07-2008, 12:50 PM
The first one I bought was 56 E12 P/U. Iwas an insurance agent and one day one of my insureds walked into my office asked me if i knew anyone who would be interested in a Studebaker truck. I said i woud as i knew he had one. He told me his grandson whom he had given the truck too did not want it. i bought it and my kids dorve it to school and to work everyday for over five years. They loved it and I loved it. We lived in a small PA town of 14K and all knew whose truck it was so I had no problem knowing where my kids were and they loved it because it was different.

See you in the future as I write about our past

tutone63
03-07-2008, 12:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP

Yeah, And it is a shame that the ones with personality you have to fight to save, while the newer bland ones will last without a passing glance.[V]

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh54/tutone63/63larkside-1.jpg
She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

tutone63
03-07-2008, 12:56 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) We don't like to admit it, but as Bams50 postulated a couple weeks ago, cars really are better and really do last longer today. That they don't have as much personality is a different discussion. :D BP

Yeah, And it is a shame that the ones with personality you have to fight to save, while the newer bland ones will last without a passing glance.[V]

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh54/tutone63/63larkside-1.jpg
She may have bugs and she may have dings, but that just proves I drive this thing!!

gordr
03-07-2008, 04:51 PM
Leonard, I loved that cover picture from Motor Magazine. I have one or two copies of that magazine myself, with equally well-done art. I wonder who was the artist, and if there is a gallery of his work available on-line or in a book somewhere?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
03-07-2008, 04:51 PM
Leonard, I loved that cover picture from Motor Magazine. I have one or two copies of that magazine myself, with equally well-done art. I wonder who was the artist, and if there is a gallery of his work available on-line or in a book somewhere?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

JBOYLE
03-07-2008, 04:59 PM
The history major in me...
and the journalism major in me...
(both make me correct small details...)
Want to remind you that the depression was over by 1940...
War production had already started and employment was much improved over 1932-33 levels.

According to the cutline, the subjects of the first photo are migrant workers...they still exist today.
They're poor, but not victims of the depression.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

JBOYLE
03-07-2008, 04:59 PM
The history major in me...
and the journalism major in me...
(both make me correct small details...)
Want to remind you that the depression was over by 1940...
War production had already started and employment was much improved over 1932-33 levels.

According to the cutline, the subjects of the first photo are migrant workers...they still exist today.
They're poor, but not victims of the depression.

63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 05:44 PM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/34blackboyladyemail.jpg

Also a 1934 Studebaker. Note the young man with the neck tie and bare feet. Obviously his Sunday go to meetin' clothes where he would see lots of his pals dressed similarly.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 05:44 PM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/34blackboyladyemail.jpg

Also a 1934 Studebaker. Note the young man with the neck tie and bare feet. Obviously his Sunday go to meetin' clothes where he would see lots of his pals dressed similarly.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

lstude
03-07-2008, 06:18 PM
And of course, this famous photo...

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/Bourke-Whitesm.jpg

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/MeatSouthBendsm1.jpg

lstude
03-07-2008, 06:18 PM
And of course, this famous photo...

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q8/LHSJR/Bourke-Whitesm.jpg

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/MeatSouthBendsm1.jpg

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 08:31 PM
quote:Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/34blackboyladyemail.jpg

Also a 1934 Studebaker. Note the young man with the neck tie and bare feet. Obviously his Sunday go to meetin' clothes where he would see lots of his pals dressed similarly.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review


:) Dick: Isn't this just another view of the subject photo that started this thread? Same Car! Look at the location of the pail on top of the car in both photos, and the stick(?) coming out on top of the left side of it (viewed from drivers position).

The fellow standing at the rear of the car you reference is the same little guy standing beside the drivers dooor, out aways, in the first photo. [:0] :DBP

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 08:31 PM
quote:Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/34blackboyladyemail.jpg

Also a 1934 Studebaker. Note the young man with the neck tie and bare feet. Obviously his Sunday go to meetin' clothes where he would see lots of his pals dressed similarly.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review


:) Dick: Isn't this just another view of the subject photo that started this thread? Same Car! Look at the location of the pail on top of the car in both photos, and the stick(?) coming out on top of the left side of it (viewed from drivers position).

The fellow standing at the rear of the car you reference is the same little guy standing beside the drivers dooor, out aways, in the first photo. [:0] :DBP

gordr
03-07-2008, 09:18 PM
Bob, I'm sure you are right.

I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
03-07-2008, 09:18 PM
Bob, I'm sure you are right.

I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 09:23 PM
Bob; You get an "O" for observation. After I posted it I did a comparison and came to the same conclusion. Thought I would leave it without futher comment to see who would pick up on it.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 09:23 PM
Bob; You get an "O" for observation. After I posted it I did a comparison and came to the same conclusion. Thought I would leave it without futher comment to see who would pick up on it.

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 09:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

Bob, I'm sure you are right.

I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands


:) Well, the young man is maybe 12 years old, max, and the license plate is Florida-1941. So if he is still alive, he'd be about 79 years old; feasible. If that is his sister in the first photo and she is 18, she could be 85 years old now.

Somewhere, I recently read a biographical sketch of a man who worked for the gov't during the Great Depression, whose assignment was, literally, to travel about the country taking documentary photos such as these...although I agree; I believe The Great Depression was considered over by 1941. (Dick Quinn: As a real historian, what is the generally-accepted end date, or at least year, of The Great Depression?)

'Can't remember where I read that bigraphical sketch; it may have been in The Purdue Alumnus magazine. :) BP

BobPalma
03-07-2008, 09:40 PM
quote:Originally posted by gordr

Bob, I'm sure you are right.

I wonder if any of the folks in that picture are still around?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands


:) Well, the young man is maybe 12 years old, max, and the license plate is Florida-1941. So if he is still alive, he'd be about 79 years old; feasible. If that is his sister in the first photo and she is 18, she could be 85 years old now.

Somewhere, I recently read a biographical sketch of a man who worked for the gov't during the Great Depression, whose assignment was, literally, to travel about the country taking documentary photos such as these...although I agree; I believe The Great Depression was considered over by 1941. (Dick Quinn: As a real historian, what is the generally-accepted end date, or at least year, of The Great Depression?)

'Can't remember where I read that bigraphical sketch; it may have been in The Purdue Alumnus magazine. :) BP

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 10:04 PM
Bob; No firm date of "The End." Despite the recession in 1938 the year 1937 was generally accepted. As to the depression era images you mention the name Dorothea Lange comes to mind though there were likely others. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

Studebaker Wheel
03-07-2008, 10:04 PM
Bob; No firm date of "The End." Despite the recession in 1938 the year 1937 was generally accepted. As to the depression era images you mention the name Dorothea Lange comes to mind though there were likely others. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange

Richard Quinn
editor: Antique Studebaker Review

56H-Y6
03-08-2008, 07:25 AM
Hi Bob
Starting in 1935 and for eight years, The Resettlement Administration and later the Farm Security Administration had eleven photographers producing a portrait of rural America.
The photographers are: Arthur Rothstein, Theo Jung, Ben Shahn, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Carl Mydans, Russell Lee, Marion Post Wolcott, Jack Delano, John Vachon, and John Collier.
Their photographs, in the tens of thousands, document a time so different from ours. Some of the photos have been published and more are available on-line
Steve

56H-Y6
03-08-2008, 07:25 AM
Hi Bob
Starting in 1935 and for eight years, The Resettlement Administration and later the Farm Security Administration had eleven photographers producing a portrait of rural America.
The photographers are: Arthur Rothstein, Theo Jung, Ben Shahn, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Carl Mydans, Russell Lee, Marion Post Wolcott, Jack Delano, John Vachon, and John Collier.
Their photographs, in the tens of thousands, document a time so different from ours. Some of the photos have been published and more are available on-line
Steve

JRoberts
03-08-2008, 08:46 AM
The Great Depression may well have officially over by 1940-41, but in some areas especially the rural South the war effort did not eliminate its effects immediately.

Great Pictures. In looking at the description of the picture the photo was taken near Near Shawboro, North Carolina. I had never heard of that place, but found that it is the north eastern corner of the state between Elizabeth City and Moyock, North Carolina.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

JRoberts
03-08-2008, 08:46 AM
The Great Depression may well have officially over by 1940-41, but in some areas especially the rural South the war effort did not eliminate its effects immediately.

Great Pictures. In looking at the description of the picture the photo was taken near Near Shawboro, North Carolina. I had never heard of that place, but found that it is the north eastern corner of the state between Elizabeth City and Moyock, North Carolina.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

comatus
03-08-2008, 05:20 PM
Those people aren't poor. It's the darn Govt-issue black & white film, obviously just a propaganda technique. When I look over our family photos, everything looks bleak. I still live on the same property, and when I look out the window at the same buildings, it all looks more prosperous somehow. "WWII in Color" on the big-H Channel was a real revelation.

My dad and I are both retired, so have the luxury of cruising around in pristine unmuddied work trucks. Our more prosperous friends, though, drive splashed-up, dinged up tarred hulks with rust spots and stuff strapped on the racks and make a whole lot of money.

My mother's family were migrant farm workers before the Crash (and would only wear shoes when they had to). They thought they were doing all right. We're so rich now, we can't remember what "doing all right" used to mean.

Oh--my generation thinks the Great Depression ended with Prozac.
Springboard for fogeyism: all through the 50's, we weren't really sure the depression was over. They don't teach that in college.

comatus
03-08-2008, 05:20 PM
Those people aren't poor. It's the darn Govt-issue black & white film, obviously just a propaganda technique. When I look over our family photos, everything looks bleak. I still live on the same property, and when I look out the window at the same buildings, it all looks more prosperous somehow. "WWII in Color" on the big-H Channel was a real revelation.

My dad and I are both retired, so have the luxury of cruising around in pristine unmuddied work trucks. Our more prosperous friends, though, drive splashed-up, dinged up tarred hulks with rust spots and stuff strapped on the racks and make a whole lot of money.

My mother's family were migrant farm workers before the Crash (and would only wear shoes when they had to). They thought they were doing all right. We're so rich now, we can't remember what "doing all right" used to mean.

Oh--my generation thinks the Great Depression ended with Prozac.
Springboard for fogeyism: all through the 50's, we weren't really sure the depression was over. They don't teach that in college.