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View Full Version : The Karakoram Highway-Considered to be the 8th wonder of the world.



Buzzard
02-19-2019, 11:44 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=os1pJcdEwIg

Awesome engineering feat.
Bill:!!:

studegary
02-19-2019, 08:06 PM
In some of it it appears that they are driving on the right side of the road and in some of it it appears that they are driving on the left side of the road. Perhaps it depends on what country you are in or its just a photo thing.

I wouldn't want to run out of fuel or break down on any part of it.

Milaca
02-19-2019, 09:10 PM
I am not certain that it is real. May be computer animation? Why wouldnt they have blasted through the mountains and construct the roadway on the ground as opposed to suspending it?

t walgamuth
02-19-2019, 09:26 PM
The bridging must be less expensive. The sides of the gorge are so steep cutting enough away would be a tremendous job.

Dick Steinkamp
02-19-2019, 09:49 PM
I know Wikipedia isn't the last word, but there is no mention on the Wiki site of it being the "8th Wonder". There are no roadways like those in the YouTube video. It was started in 1959 and completed in 1979. I doubt if the technology existed then to build it like in the video.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Highway

Some of the pictures of the highway from Wiki...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/Karakorum-carretera-d08.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Cathedral_Ridge_Passu_NEFrontier_Pakistan.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/73/Baltistan.jpg/800px-Baltistan.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e0/Karakoram_Highway_.jpg/1280px-Karakoram_Highway_.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Landslide_2.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/The_beautiful_Karakoram_Highway.jpg/1280px-The_beautiful_Karakoram_Highway.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
02-19-2019, 09:54 PM
Another description that doesn't match the video...

https://www.dangerousroads.org/asia/pakistan/3334-karakoram-highway-pakistan-2.html

https://www.dangerousroads.org/images/stories/__Roads00000aa/Karakoram%20Highway0.jpg





Another...

https://againstthecompass.com/en/karakoram-highway/

https://againstthecompass.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/karakorum-highway-1024x683.jpg



One more....(I'll stop now)...

https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Karakoram_Highway

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/da/The_Mighty_Karakoram_Highway_01.jpg/800px-The_Mighty_Karakoram_Highway_01.jpg

8E45E
02-20-2019, 06:38 AM
I know Wikipedia isn't the last word, but there is no mention on the Wiki site of it being the "8th Wonder". There are no roadways like those in the YouTube video. It was started in 1959 and completed in 1979. I doubt if the technology existed then to build it like in the video.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karakoram_Highway

From the opening paragraph in your link:

"The Karakoram Highway (Urdu: شاہراہ قراقرم‬‎, known by its initials KKH, also known as N-35 or National Highway 35 (Urdu: قومی شاہراہ 35‬‎), or the China-Pakistan Friendship Highway) is a 1,300-kilometre (810 mi) national highway which extends from Hasan Abdal in the Punjab province of Pakistan to the Khunjerab Pass in Gilgit-Baltistan, where it crosses into China and becomes China National Highway 314. The highway connects the Pakistani provinces of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa plus Gilgit-Baltistan with China's Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The highway is a popular tourist attraction, and is one of the highest paved roads in the world, passing through the Karakoram mountain range, at 36°51′00″N 75°25′40″E at maximum elevation of 4,714 metres (15,466 ft) near Khunjerab pass.[1] [2][3] Due to its high elevation and the difficult conditions in which it was constructed, it is often referred to as the Eighth Wonder of the World.[4][5][6] The highway is also a part of the Asian Highway AH4."

Craig

t walgamuth
02-20-2019, 07:36 AM
So is the film fake or not?

BobPalma
02-20-2019, 07:52 AM
:)Hrumph! Nothing is as majestic as southern Indiana's Tulip Trestle:

www.wthr.com/article/only-indiana-tulip-trestle (http://www.wthr.com/article/only-indiana-tulip-trestle)

It really is out in the middle of nowhere, but my wife and I took a trip down just to see it a couple years ago. Fascinating, as odd as that seems. It's so far out in the middle of nowhere that it really takes you back. The YoHo Grocery has a nice lunch area where we had lunch; great home-made deli sandwiches and pies.

One of the stories / legends / folk lores regarding the trestle is that it's the only known place where smoking saved a man's life!

To wit: 'Back in the teens (the 1900s teens, not the 2000s teens!), a freight train stopped on the trestle for some reason. It was so dark (believable, as remote as it is) that a fellow in the caboose, smoking a cigarette, stepped out the back of the caboose, planning to step down onto the ground from a side step off the caboose. But before he did, he flipped his lit cigarette off the side of the steps.

He noticed just in time that the cigarette didn't seem to land on the ground, it just disappeared down, down, down into the darkness. That served as a warning that they were on the trestle and he'd better not step off the caboose!

If you ever travel through southern Indiana, it's worth finding....as is lunch at The YoHo Grocery. :cool: BP

8E45E
02-20-2019, 08:17 AM
:)Hrumph! Nothing is as majestic as southern Indiana's Tulip Trestle:

www.wthr.com/article/only-indiana-tulip-trestle (http://www.wthr.com/article/only-indiana-tulip-trestle)

It appears there are a large number of those vintage railroad bridges spanning deep canyons, and river valleys all over North America and other places still in use after 100 years or more, including the Lethbridge Viaduct one is able to see in the background of a photo I took here, http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?70928-Northwest-Overdrive-in-Lethbridge-Anyone-going and the High Level Bridge in Edmonton, just to name two of them that are within 200 miles of where I live. More on the Lethbridge Viaduct here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lethbridge_Viaduct and High Level Bridge in Edmonton here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Level_Bridge_(Edmonton)

Craig

Dick Steinkamp
02-20-2019, 10:07 AM
From the opening paragraph in your link:

"it is often referred to as the Eighth Wonder of the World.[4][5][6] The highway is also a part of the Asian Highway AH4.[/I]"

Craig

Sorry, I missed that. It probably was quite the accomplishment when it was built 40-60 years ago.

Can anyone find anything from other sources that look like the video? I can't. You would think that if it exists there would be lots of news stories during the proposal, design, construction, and when it opened.

We are easily fooled...and tend to believe what we want to believe. ;)

rockne10
02-20-2019, 02:10 PM
:)Hrumph!Until it was knocked down by a tornado on July 21, 2003 The Kinzua Viaduct bridge in Madd Doodler's back yard was just 148 feet shorter than the Tulip Trestle at 2,052 feet, but twice as high at 301 feet. The highest railroad viaduct in the world at that time, and also called "the eighth wonder of the world." Construction on it began in 1881.
And the Keystone Region Chapter was able to take 104 of our members across the viaduct and back behind a steam locomotive on our Fall Tour in 1996.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZFfqM1WOyQ

t walgamuth
02-20-2019, 06:21 PM
Cool! Thanks for sharing these with us. Spectacular achievements in Engineering.

cliffh
02-21-2019, 11:02 AM
Built in 1910-1912, the Joso High Bridge over the Snake river claimed to be the highest and the longest in the world and is still in use today. I rode a UP passenger train over this bridge several times when travelling to and from college in Spokane (Go Gonzaga). More info on the bridge here: http://www.scenicusa.net/011511.html

https://imgur.com/a/LHIrkXNhttps://i.imgur.com/UmUVus5.jpg

Cliff

Skip Lackie
02-22-2019, 08:04 AM
Some of the portions of the video are obviously fake. Others appear to be real, but are shots of the same (probably Chinese) spectacular bridges, taken from different perspectives. The Chinese (where they drive on the right) are clearly capable of some spectacular feats of civil engineering; the Pakistanis (where they drive on the left) not so much.

t walgamuth
02-22-2019, 09:22 AM
Built in 1910-1912, the Joso High Bridge over the Snake river claimed to be the highest and the longest in the world and is still in use today. I rode a UP passenger train over this bridge several times when travelling to and from college in Spokane (Go Gonzaga). More info on the bridge here: http://www.scenicusa.net/011511.html

https://imgur.com/a/LHIrkXNhttps://i.imgur.com/UmUVus5.jpg

Cliff

I guess it's the highest and longest still in use...?

studegary
02-22-2019, 10:01 AM
I guess it's the highest and longest still in use...?

Probably, and qualify that with used for trains. For example, the railroad bridge over the Hudson River in Poughkeepsie, NY was built in the 1800s (IIRC) and was used by trains until fairly recently and is now a pedestrian bridge as part of a miles long walkway along what was the rail trail.

Skip Lackie
02-23-2019, 11:47 AM
There are a number of bridges that are either the longest or the highest, so which is more important? The bridge that Gary mentions is 6,768 feet long and 212 feet above the Hudson River -- so it may be a champion of sorts. It was built for the New Haven Railroad in 1889 and stayed in service until 1974, when part of the decking was damaged by a fire. Blame was placed on poor maintenance by the Penn Central RR, which had taken over operations of the New Haven. The Penn Central was broke and had downgraded that line to save money. It is now owned by New York state and is open to pedestrians only.

52hawk
02-23-2019, 03:04 PM
https://www.johnweeks.com/river_illinois/pages/illC04.html Here's an interesting story about 'my' bridge,it over 7000 feet long. I drive under it on 351 several times a week, and the south abutment is within a walking distance of my house.

Buzzard
03-20-2019, 06:12 PM
Here is a sequel to my post in February. I know some here will still poo poo it but it is (at least to me) pretty spectacular.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-XDxCb92X4

Bill

studegary
03-20-2019, 09:36 PM
Here is a sequel to my post in February. I know some here will still poo poo it but it is (at least to me) pretty spectacular.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-XDxCb92X4

Bill

I thought that China had right hand drive cars that they drove on the left side of the road. All of the pictures on this video show cars driving on the right side of the road.

gjamesk
03-20-2019, 10:33 PM
I thought that China had right hand drive cars that they drove on the left side of the road. All of the pictures on this video show cars driving on the right side of the road.

Mainland China drives on the right, Hong Kong still drives on the left.

t walgamuth
03-21-2019, 08:09 AM
Hong cong used to be British.

Driving on left in Japan too.

studegary
03-21-2019, 09:50 AM
Hong cong used to be British.

Driving on left in Japan too.

Thanks. I guess that I was thinking of Japan.

t walgamuth
03-24-2019, 09:34 AM
I thought that might be the case.;)