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Lynn
09-12-2018, 03:09 PM
Didn't know where to post this, but figured this was OK since Studebaker used to own STP.

Looking for info on this banner. Anyone know what vintage it is? It is about 4 foot by 6 foot.

Any ideas on value? I have a chance to buy it before it is advertised.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Lynn

2R5
09-12-2018, 03:26 PM
Without pictures it’s hard to value

studegary
09-12-2018, 07:52 PM
My WAG is that it was a banner used at a race track in the 1960s. I can not see it being worth more than $50 in good condition because I don't see much of a market for it.

jclary
09-12-2018, 08:25 PM
This is a question for Richard Quinn, he probably has a truckload of 'em and the original "proofs.";)

Lynn
09-12-2018, 08:35 PM
Without pictures it’s hard to value

Well, crap. Got interrupted and forgot to attach the pic.75662

Doesn't look like something that would be used at the track. Thinking more retail setting.

studegary
09-12-2018, 08:44 PM
The picture helps a lot. I was thinking that it was one of those big STP banners that you see at race tracks (that just have one big "STP" and sometimes "Welcome Race Fans"). This item is a new one on me. I still do not see much value because I can not imagine a market for it.

StudeRich
09-13-2018, 12:05 AM
Looks to me like a roll of material used to make the Indy 500 Studebaker/STP/Granetelli Race Team Coveralls! :D

Most Flags and Banners went Horizontal not Vertically.

HAWK64
09-13-2018, 12:22 AM
I agree with StudeRich from images I've seen in the past.

Commander Eddie
09-13-2018, 09:44 AM
Looks to me like a roll of material used to make the Indy 500 Studebaker/STP/Granetelli Race Team Coveralls! :D

Most Flags and Banners went Horizontal not Vertically.
Except this has a hem at the top and bottom suggesting it was for a support rod for display vertically.

jclary
09-13-2018, 10:06 AM
Except this has a hem at the top and bottom suggesting it was for a support rod for display vertically.

Like most things, textile graphic and printing technology have undergone a progression through the years. This material could have been produced by an old-fashioned flat-bed squeegee method, or roll-screen. Later method of uniform patch production was by needlepoint embroidery using "card punch" technology. Now, it is probably completely computerized controllers without the cumbersome old punch cards.

In the earlier methods, errors in alignment and finish were anticipated and production runs were often overproduced to allow for adjustments on the fly. Therefore, I can understand where this material could be used for all the above-speculated purposes.