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bezhawk
08-26-2018, 04:18 PM
For those of you that still think Studebaker pricing should be stuck in the 70s. here is a reminder of what is happening to prices. This just sold for $30,000.....yep THIRTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.75120

JRoberts
08-26-2018, 04:33 PM
Oh my!:eek:

Blue 15G
08-26-2018, 05:15 PM
Ford Pinto - The car nobody wanted, but everyone bought.

Funny, you saw these everywhere back in the day, and they suddenly disappeared all at once!

TWChamp
08-26-2018, 05:21 PM
Hmm...........I was just telling my neighbor that common sense has left America. 30K could have bought some nice Studebakers.

swvalcon
08-26-2018, 05:26 PM
And to think I sold some for $200 bucks. But I also sold a 1970 SS 396 for $900 and no one wanted it because it was a gas hog and gas was hard to come by.

studefan
08-26-2018, 06:06 PM
I'm guessing that that Pinto must have very few to no miles on it to command that price.

StudeNewby
08-26-2018, 08:18 PM
I know the reputation of Pintos; even when I owned one it was maligned. But for a high school/college kid, it was great. But $30k??? Like Joe said: WOW!

bob40
08-26-2018, 08:35 PM
Meh. I drove through the local Chevrolet dealership for the first time in over 20 years and saw prices on USED trucks that were higher than what I paid for my house.
That was a eye opener.
For clarity I will state I bought the house 35 years ago when Delano was still a small farming town.

studegary
08-26-2018, 08:42 PM
Meh. I drove through the local Chevrolet dealership for the first time in over 20 years and saw prices on USED trucks that were higher than what I paid for my house.
That was a eye opener.
For clarity I will state I bought the house 35 years ago when Delano was still a small farming town.

Your post made me look at what state you live in. We bought our current home 28 years ago and I could now buy four very nice new trucks for the same price.

evilhawk
08-27-2018, 12:00 AM
I imagine some trust fund baby hipster bought it.

mike cenit
08-27-2018, 06:48 AM
Blue; they were entry level, cheap cars, when they were done, they were thrown away, like the Vega, I had one , a starter, bought for $1650 new, radio, heater, that was about it.

jackb
08-27-2018, 07:16 AM
more than likely a collector filling out a bucket list or other. money is no object. absolutely no reflection of true value. This is where the price sold is not really the value price...

Jeff_H
08-27-2018, 09:38 AM
My Dad's uncle Mark had one almost like that, but a lighter shade of green. He'd come to the farm to visit grandma and I remember that car well. One time the glove box door had fallen off and he asked Dad if he could fix it. The screws had fallen out (we found them laying somewhere in the car).

The last Pinto's were made in 1980 and I don't think I have seen one one the road as a driver since about 1990 at least. I think the reason this one has "value" over what its condition would otherwise have as just a old cheap car is the Pinto is somewhat of a icon in a sense and the bursting into flames "reputation" it got in the media put it into the public consciousness. There cannot be too many of these left in minty shape as was said they were used up and tossed.

I would wonder if a similar condition Ford Escort wagon or Chevy Cavalier or a early K car, etc would ever bring such a price as those don't seem to every have gotten any notoriety in the media, etc.

8E45E
08-27-2018, 01:45 PM
I would wonder if a similar condition Ford Escort wagon or Chevy Cavalier or a early K car, etc would ever bring such a price as those don't seem to every have gotten any notoriety in the media, etc.

A few years ago, there was a photo of a fully restored first generation Dodge minivan in Sports Car Market, I think it was, and they questioned why anyone would do so.

I would have thought the ONLY Pinto that would ever carry any value would have to be the short-lived 1978-79 'Cruisin' Wagon' with the round heavy-tint rear quarter porthole windows.

Craig

556063
08-27-2018, 02:46 PM
When I was a kid, I set the price to mow a normal sized lot to the price of an AMT or Revell plastic model kit. When I started in about 1974, that was $2.50. Soon had to move to $3.50 after the first year. That included the 5% Sales Tax at the time, which I passed along to my customers back then. Every 4th or 5th lawn paid for fuel.

I paid almost $30 for the last Round 2 AMT kit I bought this year. 1953 Studebaker 3 in 1. One of the first models I built back then.

$30K is the price of the average new sedan now. That may give some insight into how people with a shorter frame of reference process prices on old cars now.

If there's still a kid push mowing lawns for old ladies, I hope he's getting $30 per lawn or more. I paid a mowing service $75 each time to mow my Dad's acre lot before we sold the house in 2017 after his passing. Only mature professionals were available today. I would have charged $15 in the old days.

Jeff_H
08-27-2018, 04:12 PM
A few years ago, there was a photo of a fully restored first generation Dodge minivan in Sports Car Market, I think it was, and they questioned why anyone would do so.

Those could be a fond memory for anyone who was a kid of a "soccer mom" in the mid 80s I suppose. Those kids in their early 40s now. Any such van at a show (!!) would need the requisite yellow suction cup "Baby on Board!" rear window tag!! Finding one of ~those~ in mint shape could be harder than some of the van parts....

studegary
08-27-2018, 04:46 PM
A few years ago, there was a photo of a fully restored first generation Dodge minivan in Sports Car Market, I think it was, and they questioned why anyone would do so.

I would have thought the ONLY Pinto that would ever carry any value would have to be the short-lived 1978-79 'Cruisin' Wagon' with the round heavy-tint rear quarter porthole windows.

Craig


A friend, and BiL of someone else that frequents this Forum, bought a Cruisin' Wagon new and kept it several years. It was unusual in its day. I haven't seen one in a LONG time.

8E45E
08-27-2018, 04:59 PM
Those could be a fond memory for anyone who was a kid of a "soccer mom" in the mid 80s I suppose. Those kids in their early 40s now. Any such van at a show (!!) would need the requisite yellow suction cup "Baby on Board!" rear window tag!! Finding one of ~those~ in mint shape could be harder than some of the van parts....

I still see those things hanging in back windows of minivans and SUV's today.

Now if one of them first generation minivans is still 'original owner', that 'Baby On Board' rear window sign will have been replaced with a front plate that reads, "Ask Me About My Grandchildren!"

Craig

Studedude
08-27-2018, 05:08 PM
I still see those things hanging in back windows of minivans and SUV's today.

Now if one of them first generation minivans is still 'original owner', that 'Baby On Board' rear window sign will have been replaced with a front plate that reads, "Ask Me About My Grandchildren!"

Craig

Or, "Millennial on Board"

8E45E
08-27-2018, 05:11 PM
Or, "Millennial on Board"

Only IF they are still living at home, and don't have their own vehicle to drive!!

One sees a lot of that these days!

Craig

556063
08-27-2018, 06:48 PM
Did an extensive Google search, but couldn't find the article I wanted. It had to be back Pre-Internet days from when I subscribed to the print "Businessweek" or WSJ. But, at one time in the 90's, the Chrysler Pentastar had similar brand recognition for kids under 10 as the McDonald's Golden Arches. Because they stared at it over the hood as their parents drove them around in a minivan.

Now, my Generation associated the Pentastar with muscle cars. Maybe, not so much for those 20 or 30 years younger. Studebaker sure did exploit the recognition of the Lark and Hawk symbols the last few years in business. Evidently, some kid in a Pinto Wagon must have had many warm fuzzies too.

8E45E
08-27-2018, 07:19 PM
But, at one time in the 90's, the Chrysler Pentastar had similar brand recognition for kids under 10 as the McDonald's Golden Arches.
Now, my Generation associated the Pentastar with muscle cars.

Are you sure it wasn't one of those Scholastic News Services handouts you got in early grade school? I recall getting one of those magazines, which was an A-Z list of companies that really wanted school-age kids to get to know them before they got to car-buying age. Under the letter 'C' was Chrysler Corporation which offered a free 12 page booklet which I sent in the coupon for. Back then, it was highlighting their Turbine Car program, and how it was going to be the 'powerplant of the future' in the mid-1960's. Unfortunately, my copy disappeared into the mists of time, therefore, I can't reference it at all.

Craig

Guido
08-27-2018, 07:52 PM
Ford Pinto - The car nobody wanted, but everyone bought.

Funny, you saw these everywhere back in the day, and they suddenly disappeared all at once!

I drive by a Pinto wagon parked in a yard every Tuesday night. Been a while since I have seen one on the road. Dated a woman in 1980 that owned one (later ended up dating a woman with a Chevette).

556063
08-27-2018, 08:08 PM
Are you sure it wasn't one of those Scholastic News Services handouts you got in early grade school? I recall getting one of those magazines, which was an A-Z list of companies that really wanted school-age kids to get to know them before they got to car-buying age. Under the letter 'C' was Chrysler Corporation which offered a free 12 page booklet which I sent in the coupon for. Back then, it was highlighting their Turbine Car program, and how it was going to be the 'powerplant of the future' in the mid-1960's. Unfortunately, my copy disappeared into the mists of time, therefore, I can't reference it at all.

Craig

Craig, I graduated from High School in 1981, and college in 1985. My first job after college was selling Chrysler Products, and the Chrysler Minivan paid my salary for the first five years of my working career. It was mandatory in business school to subscribe to the WSJ and one other business publication at the time. The article revolved around the Minivan, so it would have been in the late 80's or up to the mid 1990's. Maybe a little later.

When the Turbine was in testing and customer trials (63-64), I was still in diapers. I remember the rush I got at the 1996 Mopar Nationals in Indy when Chrysler Corp. had one there, and I was in the crowd that got to hear it run as it rolled past me. We'd always been told they were all destroyed before that. I always say, that meet was the most exciting I've ever attended in my adulthood.

Ranks right up there with when my Parents and Grandma took me to the old Studebaker Collection Display in the lower levels of the Administration Building for the first time in the early 70's. The keys to my '55 still hang on the SDC Keychain I bought on that trip. I bought it and told my family the keys to my Studebaker would hang from it. 45 or more years ago now. Boy, I miss those thrills as a child, and those days. It will be 40 years next June with my '55. The money I bought the '55 with came from my lawn mowing business.

Studedude
08-27-2018, 08:33 PM
<snip>the Pinto is somewhat of a icon in a sense and the bursting into flames "reputation"
Our military spent billions of dollars developing the abrams tanks back in that time frame. It would have been a lot more cost effective to buy 100,000 Pintos, and send 'em in backwards!

Guido
08-27-2018, 08:52 PM
Our military spent billions of dollars developing the abrams tanks back in that time frame. It would have been a lot more cost effective to buy 100,000 Pintos, and send 'em in backwards!

Now you have given the suicide bombers lurking on this Forum an inspiration...

8E45E
08-27-2018, 09:37 PM
Now you have given the suicide bombers lurking on this Forum an inspiration...

Where is anyone going to find 100,000 Pintos these days?

Craig

Stude Shoo-wop!
08-28-2018, 06:54 AM
I feel a bit better now for spending $25,000 on my 1962 GT Hawk. That's a car that makes me feel as though I would never want another!

studegary
11-01-2018, 10:02 PM
A friend, and BiL of someone else that frequents this Forum, bought a Cruisin' Wagon new and kept it several years. It was unusual in its day. I haven't seen one in a LONG time.


Cruising Wagon production: 10,029 for 1977 and 5329 for 1978. Strange how they both end with 29. I can understand why there was no 1979 version after a 47% drop in production from 1977 to 1978. Easy to see why we do not see them now. I know that there are a handful of nice ones still around.

Mrs K Corbin
11-02-2018, 06:54 AM
You could always Airdrop the Pintos! :lol:

Buzzard
11-02-2018, 11:13 AM
Revisit the Blues Brothers movie. They even fly.
Bill

Mike Sal
11-02-2018, 11:25 AM
I had an early pinto as a clunker back in the 80's. It had the german motor & one cylinder was dead so it vibrated a lot. Whenever the clutch pedal would start to feel spongy I would know that all the bell housing bolts had come loose again & I would have to tighten them up again. Had a lot of fun spinning donuts in the winter snow on parking lots by using the emergency brake.
Mike Sal

Noxnabaker
11-02-2018, 11:44 AM
Well Jake (#28), I'm planning to keep Josephine for the rest of my driving days too, not that I'm as young as you but I aint dead just yet...
;)

Hallabutt
11-02-2018, 02:37 PM
Your memories of your Pinto experiences made me chuckle. A good friend was given their 1973 or 74, Pinto hatchback in about 1980, by his folks. My friend worked in engineering at Boeing for several years, until he got laid off. He took the Pinto along with a dozen of his collector cars to Lancaster Ca. when he went to work for Rockwell. He continued to drive the Pinto well into the 90's. Any normal person would have given up on the car long before he did, but he like I don't give up on our vehicles until we have to. People would see him driving the Pinto, chase him down and offer him parts, and a whole car for free. He told me with all the parts that he had accumulated, he could drive his car forever. That was until he met a woman who was not impressed by his choice of conveyance. He confided in me that driving the Pinto, in California, had began to say more about the driver then the car. Out of self defense he virtually gave all the cars and parts away for virtually nothing, about what he had invested in them.

bensherb
11-03-2018, 01:13 AM
The last Pinto's were made in 1980 and I don't think I have seen one one the road as a driver since about 1990 at least. I think the reason this one has "value" over what its condition would otherwise have as just a old cheap car is the Pinto is somewhat of a icon in a sense and the bursting into flames "reputation" it got in the media put it into the public consciousness. There cannot be too many of these left in minty shape as was said they were used up and tossed.

I would wonder if a similar condition Ford Escort wagon or Chevy Cavalier or a early K car, etc would ever bring such a price as those don't seem to every have gotten any notoriety in the media, etc.

I've had several Pintos a '72, two '76s, '79 and '80 (there were three more in the family too). They were quite nice cars. All most people know or remember is the bad press, and most who make noise about them never had one, so they get unjustly maligned just as Studebaker does. Ford had corrected the issue related to fires by '77 and recalled all models prior to that to be rectified of the issue. You have to remember that, at the time, the Pinto was inexpensive, under $2000 out the door, had great fuel economy (for the time), was relitively comfortable, reliable , and easy to drive; exactly what it was designed to be. The first Pintos are now 48 years old, that's like a Model T in 1975, I think some slack is deserved at that point.

I liked all the Pintos I've had. I had only one "issue" with any of them. That was with the '72, I had "hopped up" It's 2000cc engine and it was quite fast. I found out soon after, that at 95+ mph the front end became so light it would no longer steer. I wouldn't call it an issue with the car itself though. In factory form it wasn't that fast or quick. And you thought those aftermarket chin spoilers were just for looks.:lol:

I still have a '76 wagon with only 43000 miles on it, with prices like that perhaps I should consider selling it.

8E45E
11-03-2018, 08:11 AM
I've had several Pintos a '72, two '76s, '79 and '80 (there were three more in the family too). They were quite nice cars. All most people know or remember is the bad press, and most who make noise about them never had one, so they get unjustly maligned just as Studebaker does. Ford had corrected the issue related to fires by '77 and recalled all models prior to that to be rectified of the issue. You have to remember that, at the time, the Pinto was inexpensive, under $2000 out the door, had great fuel economy (for the time), was relitively comfortable, reliable , and easy to drive; exactly what it was designed to be. The first Pintos are now 48 years old, that's like a Model T in 1975, I think some slack is deserved at that point.

I still have a '76 wagon with only 43000 miles on it, with prices like that perhaps I should consider selling it.

I saw a baby-blue Pinto wagon parked on the street the other day, and it didn't appear to be modified in any way. The only Vegas I might see parked on the street these days have SBC motors under the hood with a giant hood scoop as a giveaway.

The Pinto proved to be a better car mechanically than the Vega it was designed to compete against. I suspect it was a lack of regular maintenance by frugal original owners who bought a cheap car at the time and wouldn't expense themselves with regular oil changes, etc., that gave it, and all the other economy cars a bad rap at the time.

Craig