PDA

View Full Version : Is this eBay claim about a 1954 3R-28 truck correct?



migral23
06-20-2018, 09:51 PM
Readers, there's a recent posting on eBay for "the only known surviving 3R-28" truck. I'm asking the knowledgeable trucks folks out here if that's a correct and accurate claim. I seem to remember that same truck with the same claim having been on eBay sometime in the fairly recent past (as in, sometime in the last year) and thought it sold then....if so, here it is again. It's listed as being in Easton PA, and for $12.500 it's way too rich for my wallet, but when I see a "ONLY ONE AVAILABLE FOR THE REST OF TIME" kind of claim, it makes me skeptical. Any thoughts anyone wishes to share? Thanks.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1954-Studebaker-Truck/173370582777?var=null

fargoguy
06-20-2018, 10:37 PM
I have no idea if another exists- but it’s got several newer parts- hood ornament, hood side emblems, 12 volt- 54 trucks are rare for sure.

StudeRich
06-20-2018, 11:20 PM
Very nice Truck, with Very nice and expensive Hydraulic Dump equipment and Flatbed.

Actually the little known fact is that the Heavier Trucks 3R-28 and Larger did have Standard 232 V8 Engines. :ohmy:

And the Hood side Nameplates are correct also, but '54's were Silver, not Red. The owner probably found that Beautiful, NOS Red Nameplate for a '55 and figured, "close enough"!

I am not sure about the V8 Hood Ornament though, there are SO few '54's I have no Pics.
But it probably is correct and was also used only on '55 V8's when the V8's became available on all Trucks.

62champ
06-21-2018, 05:34 AM
If someone has the Turning Wheels with the article on the 3Rs, that would give a better idea. Problem with those bigger trucks is that they were available in various wheel base and power-train options - there might have only been 25 made like this truck...

Mrs K Corbin
06-21-2018, 06:39 AM
make a good car hauler with some mods to the dump bed. :!:

Skip Lackie
06-21-2018, 08:06 AM
If someone has the Turning Wheels with the article on the 3Rs, that would give a better idea. Problem with those bigger trucks is that they were available in various wheel base and power-train options - there might have only been 25 made like this truck...

Yes. Fred Fox wrote an article on 3R trucks in TW about 3-4 years ago, and there was a follow-up piece a few months later that included pix of some of the surviving big 3R trucks. I'm pretty sure there were a couple of 3R28 and 3R38 shown. (Am not at home right now so can't pull up that issue. I also have data on exactly how many of each model were built. Can provide it later if anyone is interested.) I submitted some info for the follow-up piece, as I own a 3R6.

The truck has a few mods (eg, bumper guards, 55 hood ornament, two-color bumper, red hood trim), some of which Rich noted, but it certainly started out life as a 3R truck. It even has the one-year-only, very-hard-to-find 3R headlight and parking light rims. The little V8 hood emblems were a late-year addition that Studebaker offered for free for those early trucks not so equipped. 1954 was the first year for the V8 in domestic Stude trucks, and was limited to the 3R28 and 3R38. All came with the 232. Four wheelbases were available -- this looks like a 171".

All in all, a pretty nice truck that I would be proud to own. But probably not the only 3R28 left.

62champ
06-21-2018, 08:20 AM
According to the Turning Wheels article on the 3Rs (Sep 2014), a total of 180 3R28s were produced for the model year. Only other model with fewer produced in 1954 was the 3R15 (Champion equipped 1 ton) with 109. Total truck production for 1954 (which does not include the 1199 4X4 military trucks [3R48]) was 6150. Out of that 6150, 2350 were exported - so only 3800 trucks were produced for the domestic market. Wonder if any of those 3R15s survived...

Edit - Checked the follow up mentioned by Skip above from November, 2014. The truck in question here (3R28-2735) is pictured in that issue. It was in South Carolina at the time and had originally come out of Nebraska. It states that it is the only known surviving 3R28 - but there is probably a barn, somewhere...

stude1964
06-21-2018, 08:50 AM
I know the current owner and am aware of a lot of recent work done on the truck from an engine rebuild, clutch, two speed rear , brakes and more to straighten out what was a "restored" truck. The electrical was gone through as well. A lot of this work was done by Witmer's Automotive in Ephrata, PA. This family knows their Studebakers and are fantastic mechanics. The present owner has spent time and money to get it to "turn key and go " status. I've driven this truck and it's a hoot to double clutch! When you kick in the rear it's almost like OD! I was surprised to hear him offering it for sale as we discussed using it to haul his Champ.
Rob in PA.

jclary
06-21-2018, 10:13 AM
I know the current owner and am aware of a lot of recent work done on the truck from an engine rebuild, clutch, two speed rear , brakes and more to straighten out what was a "restored" truck. The electrical was gone through as well. A lot of this work was done by Witmer's Automotive in Ephrata, PA. This family knows their Studebakers and are fantastic mechanics. The present owner has spent time and money to get it to "turn key and go " status. I've driven this truck and it's a hoot to double clutch! When you kick in the rear it's almost like OD! I was surprised to hear him offering it for sale as we discussed using it to haul his Champ.
Rob in PA.

Personally, I like the truck! And I appreciate you speaking up regarding the current owner. While checking out the eBay link, I also checked their "other listings," and realized that he is not a "Studebaker Novice," nor a vintage vehicle novice. As far as why he's selling it, it could be a case where the "reality of the concept," is not as much fun as when it was only "dream" of how much fun it would be to have a hauler of this vintage.

Several years ago, I had a modern ECM controlled 13ton caterpiller diesel powered truck. It was equipped with air ride suspension (automatic load sensing compensation) turbo charger, air conditioning, radios, computer, GPS, and sleeper cab.
A vintage truck like this '54 would be a fun vehicle to tool down to a local cruise-in, but a hot, noisey, bouncing, double clutching, driver-busy experience. Personally, I would love it, but for me, earplugs would be a requirement, and my "what might break next" anxiety would be elevated. Add to the mix that regardless of the trucks "vintage/collector" status, state DMVs are humorless regarding fees and regulations on truck weight, regs., and fees. Then there's the insurance, big tires, etc.

Back to performance, these trucks were not built with interstates in mind. Without a turbo, uphill is a challenge, and gaining enough speed downhill to get over the next hill can become downright scary. Add to that mix, a tiny bit of steering box wear, combined with equally tiny wear in tie rod end, kingpins, and spring bushings...this beast might just decide to start walking down the road instead of smoothly rolling. I've been there with 1960's Mack Trucks with the old twin shift lever transmissions.

I think this could be a blast to own by the right person, but just remember, it won't fit in the average two car garage, and there is much more work than just getting in and driving over to your favorite hangout.;)

Skip Lackie
06-21-2018, 02:16 PM
I know the current owner and am aware of a lot of recent work done on the truck from an engine rebuild, clutch, two speed rear , brakes and more to straighten out what was a "restored" truck. The electrical was gone through as well. A lot of this work was done by Witmer's Automotive in Ephrata, PA. This family knows their Studebakers and are fantastic mechanics. The present owner has spent time and money to get it to "turn key and go " status. I've driven this truck and it's a hoot to double clutch! When you kick in the rear it's almost like OD! I was surprised to hear him offering it for sale as we discussed using it to haul his Champ.
Rob in PA.

Would like to know the real axle ratios. The original 3R28s were only available with 6.48-8.86. Not exactly interstate highway friendly.

Skip Lackie
06-21-2018, 02:23 PM
Add to the mix that regardless of the trucks "vintage/collector" status, state DMVs are humorless regarding fees and regulations on truck weight, regs., and fees.


Not true of all states. Many states charge a (low) flat fee for antique/historic tags, regardless of weight, class, etc. However, the use of the vehicle (mileage, etc) may be severely restricted.

Here in DC, a local cement company has a 1920s Mack cement mixer registered with historic tags. The fee is the same as for my 1954 3R6: $25 a year.

jclary
06-21-2018, 02:31 PM
Not true of all states. Many states charge a (low) flat fee for antique/historic tags, regardless of weight, class, etc. However, the use of the vehicle (mileage, etc) may be severely restricted.

Here in DC, a local cement company has a 1920s Mack cement mixer registered with historic tags. The fee is the same as for my 1954 3R6: $25 a year.

Most fees in SC are pretty reasonable compared to many other states. However, since 1975 on my half ton 6 cylinder E-5 Studebaker, I have been paying about double what my Studebaker cars cost at the DMV. I do not buy antique tags due to the Parade or show only driving restrictions.

62champ
06-21-2018, 02:32 PM
Not true of all states. Many states charge a (low) flat fee for antique/historic tags, regardless of weight, class, etc. However, the use of the vehicle (mileage, etc) may be severely restricted.

Pretty nice here in KY - yearly taxes are paid to the county - total for all three of my Studebakers this year went over $3 because I got the second Champ last summer...