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Jeffry Cassel
06-20-2018, 03:10 PM
So the last brake system was on the Galaxie. 5 min and done. This 57 Studebaker is about to put me in the closed ward. 4 days and still no %$##^&* brakes. All new components and no discernable leaks.. Studebakers are the only things I know where the laws of physics just do not seem to apply. Ideas?? (beyond the obvious please!)

Garthok
06-20-2018, 03:51 PM
Can you provide more detail on what you have done so far?

Possibly a blockage or no pressure from master? with the line removed from the master cylinder can you pump fluid out? Just move down the line and see where the fluid stoppage is.

64studeavanti
06-20-2018, 04:06 PM
Did you bench bleed the master cylinder?

TWChamp
06-20-2018, 08:23 PM
3 ways to bleed the brakes, which one are you using?
2 people, one to pump while the other opens and closes the bleed screw.
Pressure on the master while opening each bleed screw.
Vacuum pump at each bleed screw to suck out the air.

I've used all 3, but like pressure on the master the best. I had to use my hand vacuum pump on my Land Cruiser a couple weeks ago, and it was giving me fits until I found the rear flex hose was blocked solid. After installing a new hose, that car now has the best brakes of any car I've ever owned. Less than one inch to a solid pedal.

christophe
06-21-2018, 02:25 AM
I like to use a check valve bleeder. They are inexpensive and you can do the job all by yourself.
On tough cases, I usually feed the system by the rear brakes, using a large syringe. Never failed so far.
Nice day to all.

studebakerkid
06-21-2018, 05:04 AM
I made a tool 30 years ago. Just pump the brakes apply the tool to hold pressure and bleed the air and repete. Start at the master cylinder and go outward and if you can not find it it could well be the master cylinder. Just cause it is new does not mean it is good.

TWChamp
06-21-2018, 07:18 AM
I like to use a check valve bleeder. They are inexpensive and you can do the job all by yourself.
On tough cases, I usually feed the system by the rear brakes, using a large syringe. Never failed so far.
Nice day to all.

Yes, I forgot about the fourth way to bleed the brakes. This sounds like a good way, and I might try this the next time.

Jeffry Cassel
06-21-2018, 07:26 AM
removed and examined mc and found it had no check valve! Found one and put it back together. Hoping that will help. My method it manual method. "Bench bleeding" mc seems only relevant if you are replacing the mc and wish to try to avoid bleeding the entire system. How wise you are! ("Just cause it is new does not mean it is good.")

Jeffry Cassel
06-21-2018, 11:18 AM
Got brakes! Guess that little check valve is there for a reason. Just cause it is new does not mean it is all there! -- Christophe: would like to know more about your method. Bought "Mighty vac" some time back -it was expensive and it never worked so don't waste $ on them!

thunderations
06-21-2018, 12:29 PM
You got a MC for a car being converted to Disc Brakes. When adding disc brakes the one instruction is to take the check valve out of the MC or the front discs won't release.

removed and examined mc and found it had no check valve! Found one and put it back together. Hoping that will help. My method it manual method. "Bench bleeding" mc seems only relevant if you are replacing the mc and wish to try to avoid bleeding the entire system. How wise you are! ("Just cause it is new does not mean it is good.")

Jeffry Cassel
06-21-2018, 01:37 PM
Yup. But it wasn't sold as a disc brake mc.

christophe
06-22-2018, 03:06 AM
Got brakes! Guess that little check valve is there for a reason. Just cause it is new does not mean it is all there! -- Christophe: would like to know more about your method. Bought "Mighty vac" some time back -it was expensive and it never worked so don't waste $ on them!

That's quite simple, Jeffrey. You just hook a length of rubber tubing onto the rear bleeder which is the farthest of the master cylinder. Then, you connect a large syringe filled with brake fluid to the tubing. When you apply pressure to the syringe, it acts as a secondary master cylinder and pushes any air left in the circuit towards the master cylinder, where it escapes via the reservoir. Of course, the bleeder screw has to be opened to do this and you need to be cautious about overfilling the reservoir, especially with cars like the Hawk with a master cylinder located under the floor boards. In fact, using the principle of the communications vessels, a syringe is not even mandatory but makes the whole thing quicker.
I had to do this recently on my SIMCA 1000 hydraulic clutch system and it worked beautifully. Previously, I had tried a vaccum pump but it was useless in this case.
Nice day to all.