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rbigcal
05-27-2018, 02:32 PM
My 64 wagon 289 was using about a quart of oil in about 100 miles. I finally bit the bullet and overhauled the engine. Now I probably have about 500 miles on rebuild and it is still using about the same amount. I just drove it to a car show 124 miles and it used a quart. So after spending over $2,000 I still have the very same problem. Seems like an unlikely coincidence that oil consumption is roughly the same. There must be a hidden problem that's being overlooked.

X-she
05-27-2018, 03:05 PM
i think you should check your valve stem seals , what kind have you got.... umbrella...

Greenstude
05-27-2018, 03:13 PM
Is the oil leaking or being burned? If leaking that much, there should be oil dripping when the car is stopped after the engine is warmed up and at operating speed. If being burned, there should be lots of blue smoke coming out the tailpipe.

What weight of engine oil is being used? Too light a weight may increase consumption, as can switching to synthetic oil on a high-mileage engine.

Is there an oil line from the engine to the oil pressure gauge? If so, a lot of oil can be lost when the rubber section of this line springs a leak. This source of this type of leak may be obvious only when the engine is revved to operating r.p.m., although there will be lots of evidence from oil spread around the engine compartment.

Not being a mechanic, I will leave it to the experts to describe the problems there may be within the engine.

GrumpyOne
05-27-2018, 03:27 PM
I had a similar issue with the Power Hawk as it would leak on the right side of the bell housing thus suspected either a rear seal, (a rarity), or the pan gaskets. There was no evidence of dampness top side but it sure would leave a trail when moving.

Turned out to be a not properly tightened pressure line into the head so the leak was top side but not evidently so.

One other possibility is a scored crank in the rear seal area assuming that the original crank was retained. Another possibility is the omission of the small piece of cork associated with a rear seal replacement. Other suspects might be front seal but that would be readily evident as well.

Good luck with your search...

JoeHall
05-27-2018, 03:27 PM
Specifically what was included in the $2000, "overhaul"?

Bud
05-27-2018, 03:33 PM
I'm thinking the rings for some reason aren't sealing due to improper installation or improper bore finish. It is also possible that the cylinder bores are either out of round, tapered or both which will cause an improper ring seal. If the engine has been rebuilt, then the valve guides and seals should have been serviced at that time. Even if the valve guides are the problem, they wouldn't allow enough oil into the upper cylinder to cause the engine to use a quart of oil every hundred miles. If there is an external leak, it should be evident as an engine that leaks a quart of oil every hundred miles will make a big mess. Bud

rbigcal
05-27-2018, 04:59 PM
Specifically what was included in the $2000, "overhaul"?

Block was hot tanked, bored 30 over, valve job, hard seats installed and pressure checked, valve guides were good, new cam bearings installed, crank turned and polished 10/10, rods checked for alignment. Probably not all

rbigcal
05-27-2018, 05:23 PM
I thought maybe rings didn't seat. I did seating by speeding up from 30 to 50 then coaxing back down to 30. Did it about 10 times. Later when I saw that oil was down I took it out and in low gear wound engine up and then coasted another 10 to 12 times. Doesn't seem to be any smoke visible and certainly no leaking whatsoever.

Randy Ridenour
05-27-2018, 05:44 PM
If you used moly rings, it could take anywhere between 1,000 to 2,000 miles for the rings to seat and oil consumption to stop. The last engine that I rebuilt using moly rings stopped consuming oil somewhere around 1,500 miles.

rbigcal
05-27-2018, 05:53 PM
If you used moly rings, it could take anywhere between 1,000 to 2,000 miles for the rings to seat and oil consumption to stop. The last engine that I rebuilt using moly rings stopped consuming oil somewhere around 1,500 miles.
No, the rings were regular cast iron.

swvalcon
05-27-2018, 07:28 PM
Rings may not be seated yet. Depends on how far you have driven it at one time. I built a 302 ford for a older gentleman and he said after about a year it was still using oil so when he went on a 300 mile trip to visit family he put a case of oil in the trunk. Used a qt on the way to where he was going and said it never used any on the way home and never used any between oil changes after that. All he used it for before that was to go a couple blocks to the store so this was the first time in over a year it had gotten hot enough for some distance to seat the rings and they where cast. Some motors just seem to be harder to seat.

JoeHall
05-27-2018, 08:13 PM
Wow, you got a heck of a deal on the overhaul. Last 289 I rebuilt was about 4-5 years ago, and the parts and machine shop labor cost around $3000.

The cast iron rings shoulda seated in less than 1000 miles, without any special procedures, other than driving it. How many miles have you driven it since the rebuild? How many miles did you drive it before the rebuild? What are your driving patterns, i.e. short trips, long trips? What speeds are you moving at. What is the gearing, and final drive ratio? What weight is the oil? What is the average engine temp?

Only 100 miles per quart, before and after rebuild, is a mystery. There is no magic to old Studes, they are about same tech as farm machinery of the same era. If it ain't leaking out the bottom, nor coming out the tail pipe, its gotta be going somewhere. I have never had a Stude motor get much less than 500 miles per quart, no matter how worn or neglected.

It will be interesting to hear what the problem turns out to be. Please keep us posted.

TWChamp
05-27-2018, 08:45 PM
Any oil coming out the fuel pump vent holes?
Seems to be a fairly common problem, at least for the last two Studebakers I bought.

PackardV8
05-27-2018, 09:13 PM
So after spending over $2,000 I still have the very same problem. Today, $2000 buys a patch job and not a rebuilt engine. From what you listed, you got way more than your money's worth, but didn't fix the problem.

A key indicator is
valve guides were good. We've never torn down a Studebaker with valve guides or valves good enough to reuse. There is no way to know the condition or clearance of yours, or what valve stem seals were used. Down the worn valve guides past worn valve stems is the most likely path for oil to get out.

Does the engine feel a lot stronger after the rework?

jack vines

Galactica5
05-27-2018, 09:15 PM
Do you have any blowby coming out of the road draft tube?
My 289 tried pumping oil out that tube with the engine the way it was before I rebuilt it.
It was caused by the previous owner putting STD rings in a 0.30 over bore.

bezhawk
05-27-2018, 10:21 PM
Wrong PCV valve Aftermarket replacements are reversed in flow than the Studebaker correct ones. That can contribute to oil consumption. Especially if rings are not seated properly yet. If the oil rings work fine, but the compression rings not seated yet, you will get high crankcase pressure, and not always see smoke.

studegary
05-27-2018, 10:45 PM
Do you have any blowby coming out of the road draft tube?
My 289 tried pumping oil out that tube with the engine the way it was before I rebuilt it.
It was caused by the previous owner putting STD rings in a 0.30 over bore.

It is a 1964 - no road draft tube.

rbigcal
05-27-2018, 10:46 PM
Wrong PCV valve Aftermarket replacements are reversed in flow than the Studebaker correct ones. That can contribute to oil consumption. Especially if rings are not seated properly yet. If the oil rings work fine, but the compression rings not seated yet, you will get high crankcase pressure, and not always see smoke.

PCV is correct double checked that when looking for oil use causes before.

doofus
05-28-2018, 06:45 AM
I'll put my money on worn guides and "Umbrella seals". Luck Doofus

JoeHall
05-28-2018, 07:40 AM
I'll put my money on worn guides and "Umbrella seals". Luck Doofus
Maybe worn guides, but there's nothing wrong with umbrella seals. I have used them exclusively in 259/289/352 motors, and have gotten over 5000 miles per quart, and most always stay above 2000 miles per quart. This includes the two GTs and one 56J currently in the stable.

Worn guides would be indicated by blue smoke on acceleration, and ring problems would be indicated by blue smoke on deceleration. Unless I missed something, the OP really has not provided much, as far as symptoms he is experiencing, other than the oil is mysteriously disappearing, seemingly without a trace of smoke, leaks, blowby, etc..

As for 100 miles per quart, it would be hard to screw up even a shade tree overhaul that badly.

PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANT: If the OP has only driven the car 124 miles since the overhaul, nothing he said counts, since the motor has not even began to wear itself in. Hope he comes back after another 1000 miles, with another report.

Jiles
05-28-2018, 10:37 AM
Best indicator for worn valve guides/seals, is smoke on startup.
If I had your problem, I would use a quality NON DETERGENT motor oil and seat rings like this ---
Go to an area that has a long hill and down hill.
Put transmission in highest gear, if standard shift, that will work on hill, when top of hill is reached, coast down in lower gear.
Just don't overheat engine!
After several times, drain ND oil and install your regular oil.

This is the procedure I used on every rebuild.

jackb
05-28-2018, 11:52 AM
just a long shot.... are you positive the dip stick is A-OK ?? Just a thought... sometimes its the craziest thing...

rbigcal
05-28-2018, 06:13 PM
First off I miss guessed the mileage I had on engine. Checked this afternoon and discovered I have only driven 544 miles including 124 miles each way to car show. When I checked oil at car show it was just a little above the add a quart mark, when I put oil in before leaving I added just a little too much. So before leaving car show I poured in part of a quart, apparently little over 3/4 of the quart in but was in a hurry so I didn't check the dipstick. Now this afternoon I checked the oil and it's a little over the full mark. So apparently it did not burn an excessive amount on the trip back. I will have to watch and see what happens now. There was a pretty good amount of uphill/downhill driving back and fourth to car show. Possibly coasting downhill could have helped seat the rings. Wont know for sure until I do some more driving. Next car show in 2 weeks will be about 85 miles or so round trip.

jnormanh
05-30-2018, 07:13 AM
First off I miss guessed the mileage I had on engine. Checked this afternoon and discovered I have only driven 544 miles including 124 miles each way to car show. When I checked oil at car show it was just a little above the add a quart mark, when I put oil in before leaving I added just a little too much. So before leaving car show I poured in part of a quart, apparently little over 3/4 of the quart in but was in a hurry so I didn't check the dipstick. Now this afternoon I checked the oil and it's a little over the full mark. So apparently it did not burn an excessive amount on the trip back. I will have to watch and see what happens now. There was a pretty good amount of uphill/downhill driving back and fourth to car show. Possibly coasting downhill could have helped seat the rings. Wont know for sure until I do some more driving. Next car show in 2 weeks will be about 85 miles or so round trip.

If I followed that correctly, you don't know now whether it's using a significant amount of oil or not.

At 100 miles per quart, it's either blowing clouds of blue smoke out the exhaust or leaving big puddles where it's parked.

If it does neither, it's not using a quart per hundred miles. Check your true oil usage again.

As far as seating rings, if they don't seat in the first hundred miles, they probably never will. It's possible to crack a ring during installation. If so, then a compression test will find the cylinder with the broken ring.

rbigcal
05-30-2018, 11:01 AM
Well not sure about oil usage on the way home, but it was using a lot of oil before. I have had to put oil in it 3 or 4 times since engine was rebuilt each time about 100 or little more miles. No clouds of smoke, no leaking.

Jeffry Cassel
05-30-2018, 11:57 AM
62's had a crankcase vent but it could have a pcv valve. I have seen those things act strange. If you have one, temporarally disconnect it and plug vac hole in carb base. If oil burning stops get a new one and be sure it is not backwards. If it is leaking you'll have a larger than normal puddle on the garage floor, and you can trace it. (pan gasket-they always need to be re-tightened rear main seal [they don't work as well when installed backwards] drain plug [no one ever replaces the drain plug seal] That oil must be going somewhere!!!! Does inside of tail pipe feel oily? If pressure is OK and temp is OK I would be inclined to drive it a while and see what happens. 17 yrs ago went to west Texas to pick up car. On the way home truck started smoking-a lot. Pulled into WalMart and got a case of oil. Used most of it on the trip home. It just as abrptly stopped using oil and never burned any oil after that. Total mystery to me.

JoeHall
05-30-2018, 12:50 PM
Well not sure about oil usage on the way home, but it was using a lot of oil before. I have had to put oil in it 3 or 4 times since engine was rebuilt each time about 100 or little more miles. No clouds of smoke, no leaking.

You have, "had to put oil in it...". But amount is key; HOW MUCH oil, total, have you put into it since the rebuild, 544 miles ago?

rbigcal
05-30-2018, 01:38 PM
I had oil in 2 gallon container, so I used a plastic paint cup for measuring. It was a little over 28oz, so I put in 6 plus 15oz stp for the zddp content. I had to add a little more oil to get right to full mark. So I have since used up the rest of the 2 gal. container plus the part of a quart in dumped in before leaving car show. So I guess it didn't use as much as I thought, still quite a bit seems like to me. It's hard to get it right on the full mark without going a little over.

jackb
05-30-2018, 01:48 PM
if the PCV is non-functioning, you might see condensation on the dipstick.

JoeHall
05-30-2018, 02:12 PM
I had oil in 2 gallon container, so I used a plastic paint cup for measuring. It was a little over 28oz, so I put in 6 plus 15oz stp for the zddp content. I had to add a little more oil to get right to full mark. So I have since used up the rest of the 2 gal. container plus the part of a quart in dumped in before leaving car show. So I guess it didn't use as much as I thought, still quite a bit seems like to me. It's hard to get it right on the full mark without going a little over.

Wait, you put a can of STP in a newly rebuilt engine??????:eek:

wittsend
05-30-2018, 03:07 PM
Maybe rather than look under the car (at the ground) look under the car at the underside of the floorboards. My Valiant had a leak where the valve body lever came through the case. I never saw trans fluid leaking on the ground. But once underway it spread out and clung to the bottom of the car. I was losing about a quart of ATF every 25 or so miles! I couldn't figure out where "SO MUCH" fluid was going without showing. As the price of ATF increased upward I eventually fixed the seal. Now no loss. So, look up and see if the leak is showing.

rbigcal
05-30-2018, 05:56 PM
Wait, you put a can of STP in a newly rebuilt engine??????:eek:

Yes I did after reading about the importance of zddp in break in oil. I read so much about it my head felt like it was going to explode. Everybody's got a different idea. Stp was about the only thing here locally that had zddp. I have never used additives unless it was in something that was on its last leg, but decided to do it this time. I was going to run this oil for a while and then change it. I thought since Studebaker put STP in the engines from the factory it couldn't hurt much.

JoeHall
05-30-2018, 06:07 PM
Yes I did after reading about the importance of zddp in break in oil. I read so much about it my head felt like it was going to explode. Everybody's got a different idea. Stp was about the only thing here locally that had zddp. I have never used additives unless it was in something that was on its last leg, but decided to do it this time. I was going to run this oil for a while and then change it. I thought since Studebaker put STP in the engines from the factory it couldn't hurt much.

I have rebuilt about a dozen 259/289/352 Stude motors, and driven them a collective total of well over 700,000 miles. Have never used any additive for break in, other than assembly lube during reassembly. For break in, I use cheap 10W30, i.e. WalMart brand, then change it after about 1000 miles. Chrome rings will take up to 3000 miles to seat well enough for upper RPM ( around 2800 and above) blow by to cease. But with molly or cast rings, 100-500 miles, and all is well. I believe STP would delay break in, due to it being slicker than snot on a door knob. The microscopic ridges on the rings scrub into the cylinder walls, so I believe the extra slickness would be a problem, but could be wrong. Once broken in I use Mobil 1, 15W50, then do oil & filter changes every 10,000 miles.

studegary
05-30-2018, 07:43 PM
62's had a crankcase vent but it could have a pcv valve. I have seen those things act strange. If you have one, temporarally disconnect it and plug vac hole in carb base. If oil burning stops get a new one and be sure it is not backwards. If it is leaking you'll have a larger than normal puddle on the garage floor, and you can trace it. (pan gasket-they always need to be re-tightened rear main seal [they don't work as well when installed backwards] drain plug [no one ever replaces the drain plug seal] That oil must be going somewhere!!!! Does inside of tail pipe feel oily? If pressure is OK and temp is OK I would be inclined to drive it a while and see what happens. 17 yrs ago went to west Texas to pick up car. On the way home truck started smoking-a lot. Pulled into WalMart and got a case of oil. Used most of it on the trip home. It just as abrptly stopped using oil and never burned any oil after that. Total mystery to me.

The original post states that the car is a 1964, not "62", so it has a PCV valve/system.

altair
05-31-2018, 12:02 PM
When an engine has been hot tanked and all the internal cast surfaces are bare it will consume about a quart of oil to re-create an oil film over all the parts. I had the same thing happen, a quality rebuild and the first 100 or so miles consumed a quart. I returned to the shop and was informed that the engine will consume about a quart in the first 100 miles for film.

jackb
05-31-2018, 12:51 PM
never heard the "film" theory..... interesting

WCP
05-31-2018, 02:37 PM
I suspect that you are over-filling the engine with oil and the excess quart is being blown out in the first 100 miles or so. By filling to the mark on your dipstick, you are not allowing for the oil that never drains from the engine. The 6 qt. US amount is only valid on a totally oil-free engine such as the first fill after a tear down or rebuild. After a run,if your oil level is at the add mark, continue to drive the vehicle. Check the oil level as often as you think necessary, but from my experience, the level will not change in the next 1000 or so miles. As long as the oil pressure remains normal, you should not do any harm to the engine.
As an after thought, make sure that the base of the engine pan has not been flattened or pushed inward by resting the engine on the pan base or jacking the engine upward during installation. This will raise the oil level increase loss by crankshaft windage.

wittsend
05-31-2018, 03:18 PM
Then there is the Bon Ami, '55 Chevy 265 ring re-seat story. Maybe Geraldo Rivera can find that GM service bulletin in Al Capone's vault? Urban Legend? I search for a verifiable story and basically found a lot of, "someone told me ..."

E. Davis
05-31-2018, 05:19 PM
Couldn't agree with WCP more. Its an old wives tale that you need to keep an engine at the full mark on the dip stick. Many engines will throw as much as a quart out and never go any lower. Running an engine a little low on oil is better than running it over full. My 289 has never accepted running on the full mark...it seeks its on comfort level and never uses any more. With the price of oil as one factor and the engines own compunction for getting rid of it I only put in a little over 5 quarts with a filter change and that seems to satisfy it.

studegary
05-31-2018, 08:18 PM
A 1964 only has a 5.0 quart capacity.

Perhaps the OP is not giving the engine time to drain down before doing an oil level check.
A bent in oil pan can change the level itself and can also cause an invalid dipstick reading. Check that the oil pan was not bent when the engine was rebuilt.

GrumpyOne
05-31-2018, 10:10 PM
If you used moly rings, it could take anywhere between 1,000 to 2,000 miles for the rings to seat and oil consumption to stop. The last engine that I rebuilt using moly rings stopped consuming oil somewhere around 1,500 miles.


When I overhauled the engine in the Power Hawk back around 1970, (don't ask me why I did this), I installed moly rings and on the advice of my mechanic left the bore alone, (no honing), with the premise that in the end, the job would be more enduring. He was right but it took nearly 7K for everything to seat properly but the engine/car is better off for it.

Now some 40K later, oil consumption is negligible except for the pan gasket leaks...

jackb
06-01-2018, 07:20 AM
and a bent (pressed) gas tank can read off too.....

altair
06-02-2018, 06:08 PM
never heard the "film" theory..... interesting
Just think about it, if the inside of the engine is bare and dry and the oil is filled to the full mark, all the parts will get covered with a film of oil that comes from within, hence the first 100 miles will consume about one quart. It doesn't leak out and it isn't burned--where did it go?

jackb
06-03-2018, 06:44 AM
no poke intended..... never heard of it. So when the engine shuts down to/from 200 degrees, are you saying it stays thick enough to cling to the walls ??? Just asking - don't know . How many years will the film stay on the inside of the engine for a rested start up ??

jnormanh
06-03-2018, 09:18 AM
Just think about it, if the inside of the engine is bare and dry and the oil is filled to the full mark, all the parts will get covered with a film of oil that comes from within, hence the first 100 miles will consume about one quart. It doesn't leak out and it isn't burned--where did it go?

I don't believe a quart of oil is unable to run back into the pan. For example, let's just round off the entire interior surface area to 20 sq ft. It's certainly not more than that. Hot oil is going to form a film of no more than .001". Do the math, that's .24 cubic inch., about a tablespoon.

Yes, there are some pockets around valves, a bit in the oil galleries, a few drops hanging here and there, but nothing approaching a quart.

What is normal. depending on the cylinder bore finishes, and rings used, is for many engines to consume some oil during the first few hours of operation, but many carefully built engines consume very little. And as far as break-in on a well built engine, I've watched new BMWs come off the assembly line. They roll onto a highly instrumented dyno where they are fired up for the first time. Total time is no more than five minutes during which time the engine is run up to max revs and maximum load. If all the sensor numbers look normal, it's ready to hit the road, flat out if desired.

jnormanh
06-03-2018, 10:41 AM
[QUOTE=jnormanh;1112495]I don't believe a quart of oil is unable to run back into the pan. For example, let's just round off the entire interior surface area to 20 sq ft. It's certainly not more than that. Hot oil is going to form a film of no more than .001". Do the math, that's .24 cubic inch., about a tablespoon.

Yes, there are some pockets around valves, a bit in the oil galleries, a few drops hanging here and there, but nothing approaching a quart.

What is normal. depending on the cylinder bore finishes, and rings used, is for many engines to consume some oil during the first few hours of operation, but many carefully built engines consume very little. And as far as break-in on a well built engine, I've watched new BMWs come off the assembly line. They roll onto a highly instrumented dyno where they are fired up for the first time. Total time is no more than five minutes during which time the engine is run up to max revs and maximum load. If all the sensor numbers look normal, it's ready to hit the road, flat out if desired.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBE7yPLzFic

studegary
06-03-2018, 06:52 PM
I don't believe a quart of oil is unable to run back into the pan. For example, let's just round off the entire interior surface area to 20 sq ft. It's certainly not more than that. Hot oil is going to form a film of no more than .001". Do the math, that's .24 cubic inch., about a tablespoon.

Yes, there are some pockets around valves, a bit in the oil galleries, a few drops hanging here and there, but nothing approaching a quart.

What is normal. depending on the cylinder bore finishes, and rings used, is for many engines to consume some oil during the first few hours of operation, but many carefully built engines consume very little. And as far as break-in on a well built engine, I've watched new BMWs come off the assembly line. They roll onto a highly instrumented dyno where they are fired up for the first time. Total time is no more than five minutes during which time the engine is run up to max revs and maximum load. If all the sensor numbers look normal, it's ready to hit the road, flat out if desired.

I did "do the math" and came up with 2.88 cubic inches. 20 sq. ft. X 144 sq. in. in a sq. ft. = 2880 sq. in. 2880 sq. in. X 0.001 inch = 2.88 cu. in.

EDIT: Your point is still made. I just took up your "challenge" to "do the math".

I have personally given some brand new $100+K cars, including BMW, a real "challenge" (speed/acceleration/braking).

StudeRich
06-03-2018, 07:01 PM
The largest "Collector" of Oil in a New, Dry, first time fill, Engine, is in the Pockets around the Lifters in the "Valley". ;)

jnormanh
06-04-2018, 05:23 AM
I did "do the math" and came up with 2.88 cubic inches. 20 sq. ft. X 144 sq. in. in a sq. ft. = 2880 sq. in. 2880 sq. in. X 0.001 inch = 2.88 cu. in.

EDIT: Your point is still made. I just took up your "challenge" to "do the math".

.

Oops. Thanks, Gary.

doofus
06-04-2018, 06:16 AM
Guy's let's get back to the problem. i still bet on guide's and seals. unless those guides and stems are factory fresh a set of umbrella seals wont keep the oil out of the guide. once the valve cycles open and shut a few times the umbrella seal has migrated up the stem. that oil mist that covers the inside of the engine gets pulled down the guide. now back to my coffee! {uck Doofus

rbigcal
06-11-2018, 12:45 PM
So now after about a 85-90 mile round trip never used a drop of oil dipstick is still at same level as it was after the trip back from previous car show. Hopefully the long drive cured the problem. But now I have discovered another problem, oil pressure is good when driving , but drops down to about 2nd mark when stopped and idling. Pretty sure that it wasn't like that before. I'm using straight 30# oil right now.

52-fan
06-11-2018, 12:58 PM
I don't know what the second mark represents on your gauge, but the pressure does drop quite a bit at warm idle. It may be normal.

TWChamp
06-11-2018, 01:55 PM
I changed my 50 Land Cruiser oil for the first time 2 days ago. I don't know what the previous owner had in it, but it was black.
I used Shell Rotella 10-30 and a can of STP. It runs 40 while driving, and about 20 at idle.

jnormanh
06-11-2018, 04:05 PM
So now after about a 85-90 mile round trip never used a drop of oil dipstick is still at same level as it was after the trip back from previous car show. Hopefully the long drive cured the problem. But now I have discovered another problem, oil pressure is good when driving , but drops down to about 2nd mark when stopped and idling. Pretty sure that it wasn't like that before. I'm using straight 30# oil right now.

So it uses no oil. That's good. I have no idea what "2nd mark" means, but with the engine hot, oil pressure down below 20 psi, even as low as 10 at idle isn't abnormal. If it bothers you, switch to 15W40 and it will be a little higher.

And stop worrying about non-existent problems.

52-fan
06-11-2018, 04:12 PM
And stop worrying about non-existent problems.

I guess it is a good thing 59 Larks had an oil light. It was my first car and I didn't know what the oil pressure was. As long as the oil light would go out when I tapped the accelerator, I just drove it. I did get the engine overhauled eventually. ;)

rbigcal
06-11-2018, 07:18 PM
I checked pressure with a conventional gauge today idling cold 45-50, revved up cold 70, hot idle 16 hot revved up 45-50. Gauge in car is fairly accurate 2nd mark is 20. So I guess it's ok. I never noticed it being that low at idle even before overhaul. Just sort of scary to see needle way down there.

wittsend
06-11-2018, 10:59 PM
Can't speak for the Studebaker engine but the general rule of thumb (SBC) is 10 PSI per 1,000 RPM. If you have 20 PSI at idle that is nothing to be concerned about. Some of the modern engines with tight clearances and running 0-20 oil idle are near 4 PSI as their normal.

Sweet55
06-23-2018, 07:21 PM
Not certain of this wagon having a vacuum brake booster. I have found a defective booster drawing oil from the engine on
a Chevrolet. The booster had oil in it. It is just a thought. It would have been on the car before the rebuild and after.

TWChamp
06-23-2018, 08:37 PM
Not certain of this wagon having a vacuum brake booster. I have found a defective booster drawing oil from the engine on
a Chevrolet. The booster had oil in it. It is just a thought. It would have been on the car before the rebuild and after.

Vacuum booster connects to the intake manifold, so I don't see how that could draw oil, nor have anything to do with oil usage.

Sweet55
06-24-2018, 01:21 AM
So a Studebaker engine does not have oil in the lifter galley? I know it does not have coolant passages in the intake manifold. Modern engines can suck oil right from the line to the brake booster. That is why they have a check valve in the line.

TWChamp
06-24-2018, 01:50 AM
So a Studebaker engine does not have oil in the lifter galley? I know it does not have coolant passages in the intake manifold. Modern engines can suck oil right from the line to the brake booster. That is why they have a check valve in the line.

I can see the intake manifold sucking oil if the gasket fails, but I still don't see how the brake vacuum booster comes into play as far as oil usage. It has a one way check valve so the booster won't loose vacuum during low intake manifold vacuum during a hard pull or an engine stall.

Sweet55
06-24-2018, 11:00 PM
Whoops I forgot to say the bad Chevy booster had a failed check valve. The oil gets on the inner booster material. As you use the brakes, which aren't usually working well, you can create a pump which can draw oil from the engine. It was an oddball case I admit. Odd to see oil in a brake booster. It wasn't as much as this gentleman was describing that he was losing but with an older car I wasn't sure all things adding together this was one thing not to overlook.