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View Full Version : I wonder what prompted Studebaker to do it "their way"



Hawklover
03-25-2018, 07:40 PM
We all know that GM, Ford, and maybe MoPar have rear wheel bearings that are lubed in the rear end itself (Rear End Oil).
So why do you think Stude "forced" owners to go through the hassle of pulling out the axles to lube the wheel bearings every 25K miles???????

I just can't figure it out?

RadioRoy
03-25-2018, 07:53 PM
Maybe because that's the way Dana built them?

StudeRich
03-25-2018, 08:01 PM
They DIDN"T!
They used the commonly available Dana Spicer Rear Axles and Wagner Lockheed Brakes as the other Independents: Kaiser, Frazier, Nash, Hudson, Packard, Jeep, International and others used, Plus Fords & Chrysler Products. MONEY for a re-design would be a Factor.

I am pretty sure Engineering believed these to be more dependable and rugged than others, like the GM setup with "C" Clips holding the Axles into the Diff. that allow the Tire, Wheel, Drum and Axle to go sailing!

Also, when you build the whole power train so bulletproof, you need SOMETHING to bring the owners into the Service Dept. :eek:

Hawklover
03-25-2018, 08:23 PM
Also, when you build the whole power train so bulletproof, you need SOMETHING to bring the owners into the Service Dept.

Now that is FUNNY and most likely true!!!!!!!

jclary
03-25-2018, 09:49 PM
I don't know about the rest of you, but all my Studes have little pipe fitting plugs on their rear axles for lubricating the bearings. Simply locate, and clean out the upper vent (weep) hole (I use a straightened paper clip), take your special 1/8 npt grease fitting (you do have one don't you?), thread it into the hole where the plug was, and pump grease until it worms out the top of the vent hole. Remove the grease zerk, re-install the plug, and you're good 'till next time! Perhaps some models didn't have them, but mine do.:)

(S)
03-26-2018, 12:00 AM
They had those until about 1956, also the last year for the drain plug.

Not everyone 'understood' that fitting to lube the axle bearings so there were more than a few that ended up with 'plenty' of chassis lube in places where it should not be....... ......... ...... Think about it.

jclary
03-26-2018, 12:29 AM
They had those until about 1956, also the last year for the drain plug.

Not everyone 'understood' that fitting to lube the axle bearings so there were more than a few that ended up with 'plenty' of chassis lube in places where it should not be....... ......... ...... Think about it.

I agree with that. Especially to the "more is better" crowd. IF you don't clean out that weep hole, and pump too much grease, it has to go somewhere. Most likely by the axle seal and onto your rear brake shoes.:(

WinM1895
03-26-2018, 01:01 AM
They DIDN"T!
They used the commonly available Dana Spicer Rear Axles and Wagner Lockheed Brakes as the other Independents: Kaiser, Frazier, Nash, Hudson, Packard, Jeep, International and others used, Plus Fords & Chrysler Products. MONEY for a re-design would be a Factor.

I am pretty sure Engineering believed these to be more dependable and rugged than others, like the GM setup with "C" Clips holding the Axles into the Diff. that allow the Tire, Wheel, Drum and Axle to go sailing!


1949/56 Ford/Merc & 1948/56 F1/F100 with Spicer/Dana 41 & 44 used flanged axles. Only 1956 Packard's have flanged axles.

F100's with Limited Slip (introduced 1959) used Spicer/Dana 44's from 1959 thru 1967 because the 9" 'drop out' wasn't available with Limited Slip in F100's until 1968.

And, some 1976/79 F100/150's also came with Spicer/Dana 44's with/without Limited Slip. 2004/2015 Nissan Titan's also used Dana 44's.

There were some Ford's with C clips, the 8.7" WER axle used on some 1967/72 Galaxies & the 8.8" introduced in 1983 F100/150/Bronco for examples.

Pic: 1949/54 Ford except wagon and sedan delivery ~ Basic part numbers: 1177 is the axle seal; 1180 is the axle bearing retainer; 1225 is the axle bearing.

FoMoCo: Unlike Studebaker, the basic part number is the group number. Adding a prefix and suffix gives the complete part number.

8A-1225-A is the 1949/56 car axle bearing excepting wagons and sedan deliveries

RadioRoy
03-26-2018, 01:58 AM
I agree with that. Especially to the "more is better" crowd. IF you don't clean out that weep hole, and pump too much grease, it has to go somewhere. Most likely by the axle seal and onto your rear brake shoes.:(

Well to be fair, there is a grease diversion path so the brakes won't get covered in case the seal fails. I have no idea how well it works or how easily it can become clogged.

(S)
03-26-2018, 02:43 AM
More than a few of the 'basic' Dana internals go back to the 1930's and are interchangeable all the way up to 1964. Some of the 1940's Danas had changes and also have parts that interchange to later ones, and so on. Studebaker and Dana had a good working relationship.

That probably saved them a few bucks (over the next 20+ years) considering they had worldwide parts and service distribution. They already had a few spares on the shelf to sell, rather than 'supercede' them to something else. Why would they spend money for nothing? - JM Studebaker.

Maybe that's what they were thinking?

jackb
03-26-2018, 08:21 AM
there's no need to use the zerk fittings out back unless you then want to "pull" the hubs/drums again and replace the linings. Its highly unlikely the outer axle seals are doing anything including dust resisitance. They are likely cork or felt and haven't seen the light of day or have been used up to where they aren't doing really anything. Even NOS (see trucks) are all shrunk up and don't provide the sealing designed. Likely too is the notched escape pathway to allow grease to pass below the linings is clogged up too. Todays grease, once correctly packed in those rear bearings will last the driver's lifetime...

Blue 15G
03-26-2018, 10:20 AM
My '55 Chrysler products (DeSotos and Plymouths) also required the puller to remove the rear drums, like Studebaker. And I'm pretty sure they weren't the only cars built this way back in the day. The design was not Studebaker exclusive.

swvalcon
03-26-2018, 10:42 AM
One good thing with the miles these cars get today 25,000 miles is about every ten years.