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wlfrench
12-14-2017, 10:06 AM
Just finished reading the Dreamers thread about that 63 Avanti and it got me wondering. Which car would have the higher resale value; A well done *RESTORATION* or a well done Resto-mod. When I say restoration I am talking about a full frame off costing upwards of $30,000+ resulting in a close to factory new vehicle. And when I say Resto-mod I am talking about the same basic quality of workmanship but with upgraded/modified features.

For example lets start with two 62 GT's (the car I'm most familiar with) in #4 condition and a budget of say $35,000 (I know you can spend more). One restored to factory new and the other with modified brakes, suspension, electrical, interior and paint etc. etc... Both *Studebaker* powered (for some reason I have a very visceral reaction to a SBC in any other make of car.

I know there is no real answer to this question I just wanted to hear the pros and cons of going in either direction.

thunderations
12-14-2017, 10:28 AM
Easy answer for values.....use another car for an example that has had more time to have this scenario play out, let's say a Model A Ford. Check the value of one fully restored to factory original and another modified with modern running gear and comfort equipment. Same thing is true with any Studebaker, other then very rare or specially built cars. A good example is the first thing most do to a driver quality car is change the brakes and wheels/tires. Next, they want comfort features.......A/C, better audio, add sound deadener and plusher upholstery, tinted glass, better handling, etc.
Today's people want it to look old, but perform as a new car. That's why the manufactures built retro cars.
There's still a place for stock, original cars and I hope they are always around, but I like to drive and enjoy my cars too, so will make modifications to make my cars fit my needs.

swvalcon
12-14-2017, 10:33 AM
From what I've been able to tell you cut the value of a GT when you go custom or resto mod. They seem to sell easier and bring just a little more as stock. BUT they also cost more to build back as stock so it maybe a toss up. With a resto or custom you can use a chev I know you said Studebaker but the chev will build more HP for one third the money and be easier to find parts. The rest of the parts you can use what you have in stock or will do the same job for the least amount and still give the desired out come.

PackardV8
12-14-2017, 10:52 AM
Restored original cars are usually easier to sell. They are what the broader market supposedly wanted at the time they were designed and built.

Resto-Mod/custom/rod or whatever are one person's vision of what he'd like to drive. That may or may not find a buyer who agrees with that vision.

On my custom Hawk, I took the looks I liked best, '64 GT front, C-body middle, '53-55 deck lid and a front bumper on the rear, with custom two-tone paint. Will anyone else agree it's the best possible Stude? Maybe/Maybe Not.

I have what the original owner/designer called, "The World's Only 1965 Avanti". It came about after a late-60s Hollywood cocktail party conversation where the owner told Raymond Lowey he owned an Avanti. Lowey described the proposed design changes for the 1965's and later sent copies of some sketches. The owner had George Barris customize his '63 to closely match the Lowey '65 sketches. It's a unique Avanti with a Lowey pedigree, but even I as current owner do not feel it's necessarily an improvement over the 1963.

jack vines

sgriggs
12-14-2017, 11:17 AM
I have what the original owner/designer called, "The World's Only 1965 Avanti". It came about after a late-60s Hollywood cocktail party conversation where the owner told Raymond Lowey he owned an Avanti. Lowey described the proposed design changes for the 1965's and later sent copies of some sketches. The owner had George Barris customize his '63 to closely match the Lowey '65 sketches. It's a unique Avanti with a Lowey pedigree, but even I as current owner do not feel it's necessarily an improvement over the 1963.

jack vines

How about some photos of that Avanti, Jack?

wittsend
12-14-2017, 11:49 AM
Nothing looks as "yesterday" as a Resto-Mod that was built for the time period. I see a lot of old "rolling money" at the local Cars & Coffee. The "food processor" insert style wheels, the "southwest" color pallet and an over abundance of chrome/polished aluminum are as out of place today as a full exercise suit, a Members Only jacket and a Mullet hair cut. I'd think the principle behind the application of cologne/aftershave/perfume carries over with Resto-Mods. A little is pleasantly acceptable and more is not better.

Not saying there aren't a lot of nice Resto-Mods out there but if not done with a "timeless taste" they tend to get those "more money than brains" snickers as time and styles change. I have a lot of "functional by a thread" cars. And, where as it would seem a blessing to have Overhaul'n take on any one of them - maybe not. One of my cars is a Sunbeam Tiger. After what I saw Foose did on Overhaul'n I felt took value out of the car over doing one nearly stock. Not mentioned, but also for consideration is the "tribute car." Time will tell on those as in the greater scheme of collector cars they are a rather new concept.

So, over the years the stock restoration is my vote for the wiser investment.

Coupe Express
12-14-2017, 12:23 PM
Whichever you prefer, resto-mod or restoration, let's face it -- it's a hobby not an investment.

TWChamp
12-14-2017, 12:32 PM
I don't worry too much about value, but buy the cars because I like them, and I think post war Studebakers had some of the best car designs ever. I also think they were well built, and I like to preserve history, so I like them just as original as possible. If it's too hot to drive somewhere, then I'll drive modern and enjoy my air conditioning, otherwise Studebakers can be driven anywhere with ease, especially when they have overdrive. There's a glut of customs out there, and we need more people preserving the history of Studebaker.

wlfrench
12-14-2017, 12:37 PM
In my case previous owners modified my car quite a bit from original but its still all Studebaker.

Hallabutt
12-14-2017, 01:19 PM
It depends on the car. If we are talking about a nicely done post war car the value may be in the creature comforts. The same might go for a late 30's, fat fendered coupe. On the grand scheme of things these have a limited value to start with. When you start talking about a "Classic," forget about it. Take, for instance, a "Classic" 1931 Four Seasons, few buyers would step up to the plate, to pay a price well over six figures, for the car as a resto-mod. Even so the value added, of somebody's personal dream, of a lesser car, has the good possibly of turning into a financial nightmare. Street rods, resto-rods, or resto-mods seldom recoup the value that has gone into the car.

I'm a stocker at heart, but if I lived in much of the country where it gets beastly hot, it would be hard for me to think about touring without AC. I admit that we have a great many transplants, who have come to the PNW thinking that everything has to be air conditioned. Thankfully we have enough natives that know better.

Few people that put real money into a car can expect to make money. Whether or not it sells better is a real crap shoot. This is a hobby, few really make any money at it. When an owner is ready to move on, the owner who has put the least into his hobby car, stands the best chance of loosing less.

64studeavanti
12-14-2017, 01:23 PM
I think it depends on what the goal is. For the semi collectable Studes such as Speedsters, Golden Hawks, and Avantis, an original restoration is worth more since these have some collector value. R1/R2 Hawks and Larks as well as convertibles also have higher desirability. Other Studes are likely worth more as resto-mods. Non R engined GTs and Hawks other than the goldens do not seem to have much collector value at this time. Hopefully, that will change.

plwindish
12-14-2017, 02:20 PM
Restoration (kept at stock) would be the best possible return for Studebaker and Avanti owners. Restoration can also get one upside down in a vehicle all too quickly, where the restorer will not get that investment back when selling the vehicle. It should be the owner's prerogative to do as they please with the vehicle, but there is also a price to pay for one's particular taste that potential future buyers would not like.

bensherb
12-14-2017, 02:31 PM
I think it depends on what the goal is. For the semi collectable Studes such as Speedsters, Golden Hawks, and Avantis, an original restoration is worth more since these have some collector value. R1/R2 Hawks and Larks as well as convertibles also have higher desirability. Other Studes are likely worth more as resto-mods. Non R engined GTs and Hawks other than the goldens do not seem to have much collector value at this time. Hopefully, that will change.

Exacty , this is what I see here. Avanti, always worth more stock, unless it's a "special" model everything else is worth more modded to drive with a stock appearing body, as long as the mechanical work is done properly.

sweetolbob
12-14-2017, 02:42 PM
Talking Avanti, there's an 83 resto-mod that was built on Fantomworks for probably cost 3x of the $48,000 that's still being asked on Ebay for the car. A couple of Brad's restored blower 63/64's have gone for much more than that at recent auctions.

You might say apples to oranges but the 83 has all the bells and whistles and while it's not a 63/64, it's probably representative of what a 63/64 resto-mod would command.

So just a data point to support restored or original over resto-moded Avanti's

Bob

wdills
12-14-2017, 03:57 PM
I think it depends on what the goal is. For the semi collectable Studes such as Speedsters, Golden Hawks, and Avantis, an original restoration is worth more since these have some collector value. R1/R2 Hawks and Larks as well as convertibles also have higher desirability. Other Studes are likely worth more as resto-mods. Non R engined GTs and Hawks other than the goldens do not seem to have much collector value at this time. Hopefully, that will change.

It seems that this post perfectly describes the Stude market.

Hopefully these $100K Golden Hawk auctions will start to drag the "less desirable" Hawks and others up in value a bit, but right now a nicely done resto-mod will probably bring more money than a pure stock restoration. Not sure about the bullet nose models. They may be more desirable as a restoration.

Gunslinger
12-14-2017, 04:23 PM
When I got back into Avantis after selling my '63 in 1990, I decided to look for an early Avanti II...they were pretty much all different and suited towards the individual buyer unless it was built on spec for sale by Avanti Motors. I felt I could change whatever I wanted as long as it was tasteful and not wild and not hurt its value...but that wasn't my desire...I wanted it to suit me.

I bought a '70 that needed attention and changed a lot...EFI, later Recaro seats, aluminum driveshaft, composite leaf springs and a number of other items. Generally it would take someone familiar with Avantis to tell it's not stock...most don't as they don't know what Avantis were equipped with anyway...they're stumped after being corrected about it not being built in Canada.

I guess you call it a resto-mod, but a mild resto-mod. It doesn't matter to anyone but me...I've been criticized by a few on it...one person didn't like the color of the pinstripe...when he gets his own Avanti he can do the pinstripe any way he likes.

My car...my money. Someone else can do their car their way...I don't have to approve.

thunderations
12-14-2017, 04:52 PM
Much of the decision to modify or restore depends on the condition of the vehicle to start with. Saving a wreck by making a resto-rod makes good sense compared to trying to restore something that will cost 3 times it's final worth.........unless that particular vehicle has classic interest or rarity to recoup the cost.

bob40
12-14-2017, 04:54 PM
There are a number of Forum members and some ex-Forum members who have very nice restomods. Most are the C/K style.Tastefully done in a understated manner I think they have or will do well as far as sales.A restomod by my definition is a vehicle that looks stock appearing outside with modern drivetrain and a slightly updated interior. Better resale than a restored C/K Champion 6 with auto or o.d.?? Can't say as there are too many variables.

Dick Steinkamp
12-14-2017, 05:54 PM
Just finished reading the Dreamers thread about that 63 Avanti and it got me wondering. Which car would have the higher resale value; A well done *RESTORATION* or a well done Resto-mod. When I say restoration I am talking about a full frame off costing upwards of $30,000+ resulting in a close to factory new vehicle. And when I say Resto-mod I am talking about the same basic quality of workmanship but with upgraded/modified features.

For example lets start with two 62 GT's (the car I'm most familiar with) in #4 condition and a budget of say $35,000 (I know you can spend more). One restored to factory new and the other with modified brakes, suspension, electrical, interior and paint etc. etc... Both *Studebaker* powered (for some reason I have a very visceral reaction to a SBC in any other make of car.

I know there is no real answer to this question I just wanted to hear the pros and cons of going in either direction.

There is a far bigger market for nicely done modified and custom Studes than for stock Studes. There are as many folks at any single GoodGuys show than there are in the SDC. Any cruise night you go to will be mostly customs and modifieds. The relatively small group of folks that want only high end restored Studebakers (and have the coin) will step up to a nicely done special Stude (R series, Golden Hawk, etc), but for the rest of the Studebaker line up, nicely done customs and modifieds will out perform the stockers at sale time...with the same amount of money put into the car.

Your caveat of Studebaker power only changes the above, however. The majority of folks shopping for a modified Stude will not consider a Stude powered one. The SBC or LS-X will be their engine of choice along with an OD auto or 5/6 speed manual. A Stude powered modified Stude will not appeal to as big of a market as a more mainstream powered one.

Dick Steinkamp
12-14-2017, 06:14 PM
Much of the decision to modify or restore depends on the condition of the vehicle to start with. Saving a wreck by making a resto-rod makes good sense compared to trying to restore something that will cost 3 times it's final worth.........unless that particular vehicle has classic interest or rarity to recoup the cost.

Actually, "saving a wreck by making a resto rod" out of it makes only as much sense and saving the wreck by doing a restoration on it. The custom and modified folks also know that starting with the best possible, rust free, complete car is the shortest and least expensive route to a finished car. In some cases, purchasing a nicely restored car and then changing the power train, brakes, etc. is an even faster and cheaper route to a resto mod.

bezhawk
12-14-2017, 06:44 PM
The funnest stuff for me, is modernizing the original drivetrain. Like serpentine drive, and fuel injection, and better transmissions and wiring. The pure stock restorations is more frustrating and a challenge to obtain exact original, or original looking parts.
The end result in any undertaking is.... it only has to please you. If that means shelves of trophys, or enjoying driving your car.

345 DeSoto
12-15-2017, 08:13 AM
My Sky Hawk has it's original, freshly re-built 289...with an Edelbrock 1403 carburetor, aluminum radiator, alternator, and a GM200-4R transmission. My wife can't drive a manual transmission, and I don't care too. The front brakes are now disc. Everything else is "Sky Hawk". I'm building this car to DRIVE, year round NOT as an investment, so I guess it's now called a resto-mod. GOOD brakes are a must, as is a nicely operating modern drive train. I LOVE the Sky Hawk, but a few upgrades for dependability, safety, and drivability put the icing on the cake for me...

thunderations
12-15-2017, 01:27 PM
True, buying a fully restored car is the easiest way to start any project, BUT, I'm talking about saving a car from the crusher, working on a budget and putting another Studebaker back on the road. If money were no object, we would all have perfect, restored cars. Some of us take a project as a challenge to save a parts car or worse and have it on the road without putting a second mortgage on the house.
Actually, "saving a wreck by making a resto rod" out of it makes only as much sense and saving the wreck by doing a restoration on it. The custom and modified folks also know that starting with the best possible, rust free, complete car is the shortest and least expensive route to a finished car. In some cases, purchasing a nicely restored car and then changing the power train, brakes, etc. is an even faster and cheaper route to a resto mod.

Jeffry Cassel
12-15-2017, 05:42 PM
Guess a guy can do anything. It is really easy to spend 5X as much as a car is worth on restoration and if a mod requires cutting and welding you just slashed the value of a collector car. Now, I did put 62 brakes on a 53 Champion because those old brakes were horrible and I'm too young to die! But if someone with a suicidal predillection buys it they can switch it back quite easily.

jts359
12-15-2017, 08:13 PM
Just watch these auctions on TV most of these Resto-mods and hot rods can be bought for less than 1/2 of what they cost to build, And most of the teething pains are worked out , Ed

T.J. lavallee
12-15-2017, 08:42 PM
In my humble opinion an original any make automobile is a rare sight indeed. Retro, hot rod or modified automobiles are a dime a dozen. I've never been impressed with them. I prefer the experience of how an older car drives. They take me back to a simpler time when you were one with the car. Just you, the car and the road ahead. That always commands my attention.

Sam Ensley
12-15-2017, 08:51 PM
I look upon the stock versus modified debate with mixed emotions. As an old man, I appreciate original or restored stock more. Before I was old enough to drive or own a car, I bought magazines like Car Craft and marveled at the customs. Presently, my Studebaker collection consists of: two 1941 Studebakers (an unrestored Commander and a Champion that is restored, but not Studebaker colors nor upholstery; a 1949 pick-up with Ford running gear: a 1956 Power Hawk with run-of-the-mill upholstery, otherwise stock; 1963 Champ with Chevy engine and transmission; 1964 convertible that has just been restored with a Chevy transmission. I plan to add front disc brakes and AC. I retained the Studebaker 289 engine, but a four-barrel carb has been installed. I said all of this to show that I like both stock and modified. I'm just happy that Studebakers are great as stock or modifiedl I like them all, but, first and foremost, is the fact that it is the owner's money being spent. Do it any way you like it.

Flashback
12-15-2017, 09:24 PM
Whichever you prefer, resto-mod or restoration, let's face it -- it's a hobby not an investment.

The shortest answer in this thread says the most. I never expect to get $25,000 out of my 53, But if I live to drive it a few more miles "that will be priceless" :!!:

lumpy
12-15-2017, 09:41 PM
I was offered fairly stupid money for my hot rod Lark one week after I had it on the road . It would have been a healthy profit margin for me... I turned it down , because at this point its still WAY TOO MUCH FUN!! I dont build my cars to sell , I build them to enjoy them... Oh yeah ..and to piss off Prius drivers.:lol:

KenF
12-15-2017, 11:35 PM
One factor in deciding between restoration and resto-mod (or any other mod) is provenance and mileage/originality. If the car lost all provenance to the point you can no longer determine how many previous owner's its had, what its true mileage is, or original equipment is long gone, and started out as a low-optioned base model, then it's not a good candidate for pouring a lot of money into for a concourse restoration.

Hallabutt
12-16-2017, 03:56 AM
I guess if I was sitting on the fence about which way to go, the questions that I would be asking is what is my goal? Who is my audience going to be? We don't operate in a vacuum, so approval of others is important. For me there is no more satisfying experience then bringing a car back to original. Preserving a car's original character and history can be even more rewarding.

If my world was dominated by the "Good Guys" audience, I would probably think that the only acceptable choice is to rod the car, but that's not how I'm geared. There is no question that "Good Guy" dominates the rod world. In this world the completion is fierce, the non-recoupable money is outrageous, the judging is subjective and fickle. Outside of the GG's show you have to figure out what you are going to do with the car. Cruise nights, small shows-without specific judging standards, or driving your creation, seem to be your best options.

People who that think that there is no appreciation for original cars, obviously don't frequent marque specific events, like the International Studebaker meet, AACA events, HCCA, CCCA the many points judging Concourse de Elegance that are held all over the world. I would suggest to think that people that limit themselves need to get out more.

As far a drivability goes, someone would have to prove to me that a resto-rod is going to be more reliable then a stock Studebaker.

Captain Billy
12-16-2017, 05:20 AM
As far a drivability goes, someone would have to prove to me that a resto-rod is going to be more reliable then a stock Studebaker.

A good way to evaluate this is by weighing the number of pounds of spare parts a Studebaker enthusiast carries on his/her way to an International Event....this is also why fuel economy in a Studebaker is not what it should be.
Perception is reality:cool:

bensherb
12-16-2017, 06:18 AM
As far a drivability goes, someone would have to prove to me that a resto-rod is going to be more reliable then a stock Studebaker.

25 years ago my dad and I pulled the stock running gear out of his '53 Champion coupe and installed a GM 350ci engine, TH350 trans, one piece drive shaft, Ford 8" rear end and brakes, and front disk brakes. In that 25 years it has never broken down, it's only had regular maintainence, replaced brake pads, and a couple batteries. Granted, it only gets driven about 3000-5000 miles a year, but how much would you need to replace in 25 years on a stock '53 Champion?

In the last three years, I've had to replace the water pump, power steering hoses, oil pressure gauge hose, intake manifold clamps and gaskets, master cylinder, a U joint, and now the transmission counter shaft bearings, on my completely stock '62 GT; and have been stuck on the side of the road twice. It was well maintained and driven regularly by the guy I got it from. I replaced all the brake stuff when I bought it, they're ok,(about the same as the stock brakes on my '53 Chevy) but not sufficient for the traffic around here.

From my point of view, the turn key and go '53 is more driveable, even with more miles on it. The GT soon will be too.

t walgamuth
12-16-2017, 07:03 AM
With my CE, I bought a car that was mostly apart and was fairly rusty. I wanted a car I could drive anywhere at any speed and with brakes good enough to tow a small trailer if I wanted. So I built it with a stock body and more modern running gear.

It has a mustang 2 based front end with a big sway bar, and power rack and pinion, 12" ventilated brakes all around, AC, a ford 9" and a manual overdrive transmission.

I have been tweaking it and working out bugs. A lot of things had clearance issues and rubbed and so forth in the engine compartment. I'm getting them worked out gradually. I've put about 350 miles on it so far. I have not done any shows as yet but I've been driving it around town.

I'm hoping to get the interior done this winter.

I get a lot of smiles and thumbs up including from young people. I would not have done it to a really nice stock vehicle.

Hallabutt
12-16-2017, 02:19 PM
When I indicated that "someone would have to prove to me that a resto-rod was more reliable then a stock Studebaker", I almost said most stock Studebakers. Why I changed I don't know, but admittedly Champions are somewhat weak. I own Champions, and drive them, but they are not my favorite drivers.

People who have paid attention to my drivel, in the past, know that I am not against street rodding. In fact the opposite is true, as long as a common sense approach is used. It makes absolutely no sense to me to rod a nicely restored, or preserved original for the sake one person's ego. To destroy the originality of a nice car for the sake of someone's whimsy is silly, time consuming, expensive and unnecessary.

In a previous response to this thread, I started by saying that "it depends on the car." I also posted an addenda which indicated that it also depends on the purpose, and audience. IMHO every car deserves a chance of surviving, after having survived for over fifty years, but realistically few post war Studebaker offerings are really special enough to warrant any extreme amount of effort. If a car is in really bad condition, find a better one. For me it's silly to restore a junker when there are better cars that are being turned into parts cars. Unless there are other factors, like family, or other special history you will be able to find a better candidate.

As for reliability I stand on my amended contention that most stock Studebakers are no less reliable then most resto-rods. I'm a 73 yo car collector, and own a goodly number of cars, and not only Studebakers, but I have been driving Studebakers since I was 16yrs old(1960). For the first twenty years of my driving life, Studebakers were a prime source of my transportation. During my over fifty five years of driving Studebakers, I have logged well over a third of a million miles. This included city, highway and sporty driving. Only once did any of my Studes ever leave me stranded. Those folks that think that a Studebaker V8 needs to be swapped out for the sake of reliability are fooling themselves, or trying to find justification for their whimsy. A Studebaker V8 is no less reliable then any of to Chevrolets that I own.

TWChamp
12-16-2017, 02:41 PM
I agree with Hallabutt. Even though I haven't put on as many miles, I also have driven Studebakers since the 60's, and they never left me stranded.
The only added worry these days is the crap gas we get stuck with, so I'll carry a spare electric rotary fuel pump.
Other than a fuel pump and fan belt, there is no need to carry spare parts.

Flat Ernie
12-16-2017, 04:52 PM
This thread is like religion, politics, and which oil is best...

Personally (and that's all it is), I drive my cars. A lot. My '53 Stude shares daily duties with my '54 F100 and I probably average 20K miles/year between the two. I have made a few modest upgrades, but usually only because repairs were needed. For example, my 3-spd/OD died (reverse broke somehow - still a mystery), so I put a T5 5speed in it. It is one of the best upgrades I have done. It makes the car imminently more enjoyable to drive, particularly around town. I also lost a hubcap & needed tires, so put modern, but tasteful (in my opinion) wheels on it with larger, modern radial tires. I noticed a marked improvement in handling with the modern, wider radial tires, so I added a larger front anti-sway bar too. I still have drum brakes (albeit off a later car, so a little bigger & better) and a Stude V8 (again, later 289 with some very mild work), but a previous owner did a 12V conversion (which I'd have done anyway), added AC, and a few other minor (mostly cosmetic) changes.

For me, it's about enjoying the drive. Given a choice, I will usually pick the Stude over the F100 (another resto-mod - later model engine/trans) because it's more fun to drive (and the F100 doesn't have AC...yet), but both are dead reliable, which is the primary goal with any modification I make.

YMMV

alpayed
12-17-2017, 02:05 AM
To me resto mod and CASO (cash aware) go together. My 60 Hawk owes me about 1/3 what it would have cost to authentically "restore" it.
If I were to sell it as it is now I would make a nice profit. (not for sale, it gives me and my family huge pleasure)
If it was a "restoration" my wife and daughter would probable not drive it and if I was to sell it I would get 1/2 what it cost me.
However I admire those who painstakingly restore to "as built" condition. I take my hat off to them.
But essentially it is your car, do what gives you the most pleasure, that is what its all about.
Allan.

bensherb
12-17-2017, 02:12 PM
I agree with Hallabutt. Even though I haven't put on as many miles, I also have driven Studebakers since the 60's, and they never left me stranded.
The only added worry these days is the crap gas we get stuck with, so I'll carry a spare electric rotary fuel pump.
Other than a fuel pump and fan belt, there is no need to carry spare parts.

Add a water pump and power steering hoses, maybe a starter and the tools you need to install them on the side of the road and you've got it.

Hallabutt: 300,000+ miles in 50 years? Is that just in Studebakers? I don't have that in Studes but twice that in just the last 20 years.

Oh! I won't be changing the Stude 289 or front suspension, just the rest of the drive train.

Hallabutt
12-17-2017, 08:12 PM
Congratulations Ben, 30,000 miles a year, that's some serious driving! That's got to be close to 2,000 hours of driving a year. That's a full time job, I hope that you get paid for it.

The 300,000+ miles is just behind the wheel of a Studebaker. My total mileage logged, over the last fifty seven years, would be closer to 900,000. I'm sure that there are still a fair number of drivers out there that have put those kinds of miles on a Stude, but we are a dyeing breed. I have never bought a new car, and don't plan to either, but this reply made me realize that soon there won't be anyone left who bought a new Studebaker.

studegary
12-17-2017, 09:29 PM
Congratulations Ben, 30,000 miles a year, that's some serious driving! That's got to be close to 2,000 hours of driving a year. That's a full time job, I hope that you get paid for it.

The 300,000+ miles is just behind the wheel of a Studebaker. My total mileage logged, over the last fifty seven years, would be closer to 900,000. I'm sure that there are still a fair number of drivers out there that have put those kinds of miles on a Stude, but we are a dyeing breed. I have never bought a new car, and don't plan to either, but this reply made me realize that soon there won't be anyone left who bought a new Studebaker.

Many years ago, I had the total of my miles driven at over 500,000. Since then, I have only added a moderate amount. I did have post retirement jobs of airline crew shuttle van driver and livery company chauffeur (primarily stretch limousines). These jobs would have added more miles than the average driver covered.

I can think of two people on this SDC Forum that not only bought new Studebakers, but they still have them. I was buying new cars (not Studebakers) when Studebaker was still building/selling new cars, but the Studebakers that I bought at that time had been used for one to three years.