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View Full Version : Tweaking the Supercharger...



JLau
12-04-2017, 11:09 AM
Hello! We are putting in a supercharger to our 57 Golden Hawk, which we purchased without one. Well, it is in, and it drives well. It leaks a little onto the valley pan, but we can live with that. The main problem is that it kicks in at about 75-80 mph. The owner probably will not go that fast to enjoy the boost (and it does boost!) Is there any way to adjust it so that it kicks in at about 55-60 mph? This car will sit in a museum and will rarely be driven.

Thanks,
John

PackardV8
12-04-2017, 01:13 PM
No boost down low could be the variable speed pulley is not functioning and stuck in the high RPM position. The Shop Manual is your friend.

jack vines

R3 challenger
12-04-2017, 01:41 PM
Assuming your Golden Hawk has an original type variable ratio McCulloch supercharger, I would first check the solenoid on the supercharger and all connections in the 12-volt power line leading to it. There should be a switch on the throttle linkage just outside the pressure box. This switch should be adjusted to be depressed and send power to the solenoid at wide-open-throttle. Make sure that 12 volts is getting to the switch and that the switch is working properly.

The last I checked, Studebaker International had new solenoids. Maybe someone else can tell us if they also sell new switches.

I recently had to replace the splined shaft on the variable ratio blower on my Golden Hawk. It was so worn that the resulting pulley wobble was kicking the large retainer ring out of its groove. A bad spline could conceivable cause the sliding half of the pulley to bind, thus keeping the blower in low blower so it would not move to change the effective ratio. When the blower, solenoid, and switch are all in working condition, full boost (5 lbs at blower output; 3-4 in the manifold) should be reached by 3,000 rpm.

George

Xcalibur
12-04-2017, 02:47 PM
Will it matter in a museum... really?

JLau
12-05-2017, 10:04 AM
Yeah, it actually does matter. My boss will drive the car when it is finished, and we drive them all on a rotating basis. He does not want them sitting dormant for long periods of time. He wants them driveable and everything on them in working order. We get a little nervous when we drive some (like his 58 Caddy Biarritz convertible or 57 Pontiac Fuel-Injected Bonneville Convertible). It's a helluva job, but somebody has to do it (grin).

bezhawk
12-05-2017, 07:47 PM
Check for a spring under the emblem covering the air solenoid. It is there for grounding the solenoid as it is suspended in rubber "O"rings, and the spring to the cover is it's only ground.

JLau
12-06-2017, 08:11 AM
Thanks for the feedback, guys!

mbstude
12-06-2017, 05:09 PM
Yeah, it actually does matter. My boss will drive the car when it is finished, and we drive them all on a rotating basis. He does not want them sitting dormant for long periods of time. He wants them driveable and everything on them in working order. We get a little nervous when we drive some (like his 58 Caddy Biarritz convertible or 57 Pontiac Fuel-Injected Bonneville Convertible). It's a helluva job, but somebody has to do it (grin).

There's a local museum that's nearing completion and currently has a half dozen Studes on display on rotation, and will eventually have 25-30 when they finish the second building. While this is all just getting started, I'll be over there once or twice a month to keep them clean and running/driving.

It takes a lot of work and money to restore a bunch of cars to operate as well as they did when they were new. And it'd be a lot of wasted effort if they weren't maintained to stay that way.

So, good for you guys. :cool:

JLau
12-07-2017, 08:39 AM
Besides myself (I oversee the collection), we have two full-time mechanics on board. Most of the cars purchased at auctions have major problems that we discover when we get them here and drive them. But they look great!