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View Full Version : What Was Spayed All Over My Firewall?



TWChamp
11-23-2017, 05:00 PM
I know car dealerships used to spray clear lacquer on everything under the hood of used cars, but this doesn't really look like that to me.
I don't know what it is, but it sure didn't stick well, and I hope a soft brush and some solvent will remove it. Any ideas what this is? Thanks, Tom

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gordr
11-23-2017, 05:03 PM
Looks like paint overspray, or maybe that WaxOyl rustproofing?

Dwain G.
11-23-2017, 08:52 PM
I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.

benaslopoke
11-24-2017, 10:00 PM
A dealership that I worked at had a "steam jenny" that was used to clean parts and such.. It had very high pressure and hot steam and would take the paint off.. Looks like a "steam jenny" attack !!

TWChamp
11-25-2017, 12:53 AM
Here's a picture of my 1928 Model A firewall showing where I started cleaning 89 years of oil and dirt by using WD-40, diesel fuel, and a soft paintbrush. I hope diesel and WD-40 can work just as well on my 1950 Land Cruiser.

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BobPalma
11-25-2017, 05:47 AM
I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.

:!: BINGO! That's the stuff, alright, Dwain. :cool: BP

JoeHall
11-25-2017, 11:11 AM
I remember when the engine compartments of used cars were detailed and sprayed with that cheap dressing to shine them up. After a year or two it looked just like your photo. A good engine cleaner should take it off.

Yep, that stuff was used to make the entire engine bay look like it had been shellac-ed, hoses and all. But after a few years, this is the aftermath.

DEEPNHOCK
11-25-2017, 11:22 AM
Always Spay and neuter your Studebakers...

TWChamp
05-18-2018, 09:47 PM
I was changing the butchered voltage regulator today and thought I'd try a few things to remove the crap that someone sprayed all over the firewall. I tried very fine steel wool and polishing compound without much luck. I tried some alcohol without any luck, then tried a screwdriver layed flat and with very light pressure. It will chip away the stuff, but it's very slow. Tomorrow I'll try a plastic credit card. The original black paint is beautiful, and I don't want to scratch or damage it in any way.

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TWChamp
05-19-2018, 06:46 AM
Does anyone know if lacquer thinner would remove a coating of clear lacquer, but leave the original black enamel untouched?

Skip Lackie
05-19-2018, 06:56 AM
I think lacquer and lacquer thinner will tend to soften and wrinkle enamel, too. The reverse is not true.

jclary
05-19-2018, 07:18 AM
I know car dealerships used to spray clear lacquer on everything under the hood of used cars, but this doesn't really look like that to me.
I don't know what it is, but it sure didn't stick well, and I hope a soft brush and some solvent will remove it. Any ideas what this is? Thanks, Tom

68733

Well...when I first read this, I thought how fortunate you are. For example...once, one of my sisters was at a drive through when her Pacifica was sprayed by a Pelican.:eek: (covered the entire car)

Then, there was the time I was on an interstate downhill on one of those steep western NC mountains. As I was passing an 18 wheeler, both of us gaining downhill speed, and only then did I discover the risk of being so close to a cattle hauler. Cows don't wait for a "rest stop." I was unceremoniously sprayed at over 70 mph!:QQ::oops:


At least, for your car, you can apply the word "patina.";)

52-fan
05-19-2018, 07:21 AM
I think lacquer and lacquer thinner will tend to soften and wrinkle enamel, too. The reverse is not true.

Yes, everything I ever used lacquer thinner on lost all of its paint.

1954khardtop
05-19-2018, 09:40 AM
Try enamel reducer on a small spot that's not too conspicuous.

drrotor
05-26-2018, 04:37 AM
Plain ‘ol mineral spirits is likely to do the trick, but of course try a small spot first...

jclary
05-26-2018, 07:56 AM
Well, it has been three days since this thread was started. You asked a serious question, to which I first responded with an attempt at humor. (I apologize) However, seeing that the discussion is still active, I'll add this...

Since you are concerned with removing an unwanted coating while trying to preserve the original coating, I would recommend you start with a progression of weaker to aggressive solvents. I am not a chemist, but I have had lots of experience with solvents, and coatings. I have sold, installed, and serviced coatings application equipment from handheld paint guns, to robot mounted electrostatic aero bell applicators to paint everything from golf balls, BMW's, and Mack Trucks.

Our "go-to" everyday cleaning solvent in the shop was a circulating parts cleaner with a vat full of lacquer thinner. Even with tough solvent resistant catalyzed coatings, a bath in a high-grade lacquer thinner will soften the coating after a good soaking. Most of us don't have such safety equipment in our home shops, nor would we want one. If it were my car, I would start out with the mildest solvent (soap & water), and move up from there. Perhaps, as has already been suggested, try other cleaners, like household cleaner/degreaser, mineral spirits, denatured alcohol, etc. I'm sure, with a little research, you can find a listing of solvents from the mildest to most aggressive. But that would be my approach. It's been awhile, but I think you can still go to some of the big box stores and buy a can of MEK solvent that would strip that firewall down to bare metal in short order. That is if you survive inhaling the fumes and potential fire hazard.;)