PDA

View Full Version : Breaking new engine in



plee4139
11-22-2017, 06:03 AM
My rebuilder has told me not to exceed 50mph for the first 1000 miles, after which the oil will be changed. I've read some posts, many with different recommendations, but all sharing the same thought about not over-revving the engine at any speed. As I remember, the procedure was to vary the speeds. Your thoughts, please.

t walgamuth
11-22-2017, 06:31 AM
What engine?

Skip Lackie
11-22-2017, 10:30 AM
What engine?

I believe Peter's car is a Hawk with a 289.

Mike Van Veghten
11-22-2017, 10:31 AM
Here's what I've done to both "new" and rebuilt engines over my 67 years (well, since the age of about 15!) worth of car and bike building.
It does NOT matter what engine, Briggs and Stratten, or a 620 inch big Chevy, to an old 392 Hemi..!

I live near the center of four freeways. These freeways have flat areas, up hill, down hill areas. One "lap" is about 70/75 miles. I make two laps, varying the "load" on the engine, not JUST the rpm. I take the vehicle home. I give it a going over, check the oil, check the oil for shiny bits..! I make three more laps, always varying the throttle "load". Pushing on the gas going on the up hill sections.
Once those laps are complete, the engine is ready for anything I'll give it.
Make sure the engine does not over heat.

Once the engine has its first 30 minutes on it, the cam and lifters are either good...or not. The only thing, the ONLY thing left to break in is the piston rings. And the "only" thing that breaks the rings in is pressure. Pressure from loading the engine for short periods, then light loads, then heavy loads. There is no bearing break in. The hard parts should NOT be touching the bare bearings. This is the shiny stuff you DON'T want to see in the oil..!

I've always gotten very good milage out of my engines using this method.

A 454 Chevy I put into my moms 72 Monte Carlo years back - I did my five laps and gave her the car. She asked, "how do you want me to drive it ?" I told her that "I'd done the laps and had it up to almost 130mph, drive it any way you want."
She put an almost trouble free 8 or 10 years (don't recall the miles) worth of driving on that car before she died.

Change the oil and filter at about 250 miles and check for shiny stuff (not good !). Then change it at 600/700 more miles. Check for shiny stuff. Then pick your normal change routine and go from there.

The "drive it like you stole it" comment you may have heard...has some merit..!
DO NOT baby the engine during its break in.

Mike

Buzzard
11-22-2017, 10:52 AM
I concur with Mike with my only comment being for the first two oil changes(first at 20-30 minutes after startup @ 2000 rpm and the second at approx 200 miles driving like Mike above) I have always used 30 W Non-Detergent. Then I switch to to the oil of choice which will probably be used by me for the rest of the motor's life, with me anyway. This has been with a variety of motors from bone stock to extremely high performance (we had a shop so who knows what brand we were working on on any given week) but small & big block Fords, Chevs, Oldsmobiles, Pontiacs, and foreign makes and of course Studebakers etc. You get the idea-we performed the same procedure on all brands and had huge success. In fact if my memory serves me correctly, the only failure we ever had was a distributor gear from an MSD distributor on a big block 460 Ford. Mike's last comment is especially true as you do not want to put the same steady load on the engine versus varying load and RPM.
Good luck to all.
Bill

studepickups
11-22-2017, 01:04 PM
Peter: This is something I cannot understand. I have remanufactured many engines over the years, Industrial and automotive. If an engine is correctly put together why will driving it under 50 mph keep it together after 1000 miles? When rebuilding an industrial engine such as a tractor it would be run, right out of rebuild, on a dynamometer at full speed. After rebuilding an aircraft engine it is taken out and flown. I tell my customers to drive their cars or trucks as they will drive them later on. The oil change is a good idea because during break in there is a limited amount of metal that will show in the oil. If one has a full flow filter most of this metal will be captured. A partial flow will eventually capture the metal but not as quickly.

DEEPNHOCK
11-22-2017, 01:15 PM
Only thing I do 'special' is to go out and put it in low gear.
Accellerate to a medium/high RPM and back off, letting the vehicle pull the engine rpm down (high manifold vacuum).
4 or 5 times doing this...to seat the piston rings.
Then... Drive it normal, but change the oil early.
(Knock wood) Have never lost an engine....

Any other break in dances are superfluous to me..

swvalcon
11-22-2017, 03:00 PM
One thing you will find is there are almost as many break in procedures as there are engine rebuilders. Main thing is don't over heat and don't idle to much.

RDWEAVER
11-22-2017, 05:35 PM
My engine builder told me to add zinc before starting and use Brad Penn #30 oil. Start engine and immediately bring RPM up to 1800-2200 and warm engine at that speed do not idle the engine. Shut it off and cool engine completely. Check oil for contaminates. Repeat procedure 3 times. On the third time adjust the timing and carb. Then take the car out and drive it while changing speeds.... accelerate up the hills and decelerate down the hills all the while keeping RPM below 3500. At 500 miles change the oil and its done.
My engine is very strong. It gets good fuel mileage. It uses no oil whatsoever and has no leaks. (Yet). His excuse for this procedure was to insure proper camshaft break in. It seemed to me that the camshaft was his biggest concern. He told me the moly rings he used along with the diamond cylinder finish on the block would seat within the first 100 miles. After 4000 miles I adjusted valve lash but it probably was not necessary. I used the steel head gaskets so re-torque was not required. I was told that Studebaker reground camshafts require .018" clearance instead of what the shop manual calls for.
I am very happy with the way it worked for me.

StudeRich
11-22-2017, 06:23 PM
Only if your Camshaft is the R1/R2 Plus High Performance Cam do you run the Valves that tight, .026 Cold should do it. :ohmy:

alaipairod
11-22-2017, 08:29 PM
My engine builder told me to add zinc before starting and use Brad Penn #30 oil. Start engine and immediately bring RPM up to 1800-2200 and warm engine at that speed do not idle the engine. Shut it off and cool engine completely. Check oil for contaminates. Repeat procedure 3 times. On the third time adjust the timing and carb. Then take the car out and drive it while changing speeds.... accelerate up the hills and decelerate down the hills all the while keeping RPM below 3500. At 500 miles change the oil and its done.
My engine is very strong. It gets good fuel mileage. It uses no oil whatsoever and has no leaks. (Yet). His excuse for this procedure was to insure proper camshaft break in. It seemed to me that the camshaft was his biggest concern. He told me the moly rings he used along with the diamond cylinder finish on the block would seat within the first 100 miles. After 4000 miles I adjusted valve lash but it probably was not necessary. I used the steel head gaskets so re-torque was not required. I was told that Studebaker reground camshafts require .018" clearance instead of what the shop manual calls for.
I am very happy with the way it worked for me.

When I picked up my "new" 289 at the machine shop, I was told that it was loaded with 50 weight zinc loaded oil, called Classic Oil.
They told me to keep the engine below 3000 rpms and not over 50mph for the first 400 miles of normal driving.....After that, change the oil with the same brand, and have a fun driving experience............So far so good......

lumpy
11-22-2017, 09:29 PM
Probably told you to keep it below 3000 rpm's so the 50 weight oil didn't blow the o ring out of the filter:eek:

nwi-region-rat
11-22-2017, 10:02 PM
what about adding STP.....? :)

sals54
11-22-2017, 10:34 PM
Here's what I've done to both "new" and rebuilt engines over my 67 years (well, since the age of about 15!) worth of car and bike building.
It does NOT matter what engine, Briggs and Stratten, or a 620 inch big Chevy, to an old 392 Hemi..!

I live near the center of four freeways. These freeways have flat areas, up hill, down hill areas. One "lap" is about 70/75 miles. I make two laps, varying the "load" on the engine, not JUST the rpm. I take the vehicle home. I give it a going over, check the oil, check the oil for shiny bits..! I make three more laps, always varying the throttle "load". Pushing on the gas going on the up hill sections.
Once those laps are complete, the engine is ready for anything I'll give it.
Make sure the engine does not over heat.

Once the engine has its first 30 minutes on it, the cam and lifters are either good...or not. The only thing, the ONLY thing left to break in is the piston rings. And the "only" thing that breaks the rings in is pressure. Pressure from loading the engine for short periods, then light loads, then heavy loads. There is no bearing break in. The hard parts should NOT be touching the bare bearings. This is the shiny stuff you DON'T want to see in the oil..!

I've always gotten very good milage out of my engines using this method.

A 454 Chevy I put into my moms 72 Monte Carlo years back - I did my five laps and gave her the car. She asked, "how do you want me to drive it ?" I told her that "I'd done the laps and had it up to almost 130mph, drive it any way you want."
She put an almost trouble free 8 or 10 years (don't recall the miles) worth of driving on that car before she died.

Change the oil and filter at about 250 miles and check for shiny stuff (not good !). Then change it at 600/700 more miles. Check for shiny stuff. Then pick your normal change routine and go from there.

The "drive it like you stole it" comment you may have heard...has some merit..!
DO NOT baby the engine during its break in.

Mike

The only thing I'll add to the above is this:
When doing your own break-in, don't MASH the throttle. ROLL throttle as you accelerate as this will give you all the pressure your engine will want or need, but you won't over do it too early in the process. But nevertheless, rip off some healthy RPMs while you're doing this. Your engine will love you for it and you'll love the experience as well.
Thanks Mike... good advice.