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StudeCat
11-15-2017, 10:16 PM
Idea: Drop a Studebaker V8 in an Avanti II in place of the original Chevy motor...

Why?

1. Avantis with factory Stude power are valuable and cherished. Swapping out an original motor would be sacrilege to many.

2. Avanti IIs are available. These Chevy-powered cars could be more affordable project cars than the original ones. Substantial modifications like engine swaps could be made with less guilt.

3. I have a 289 project engine in need of a car.

Is this crazy talk? Has anyone done this before?

harry
11-15-2017, 10:28 PM
Avanti ll's are not Avantis.
Does not matter what power plant you put in.

64V-K7
11-16-2017, 05:41 AM
Hmmm, The early RQA's (66-70) were built in the Avanti Factory, with Studebaker built bodies, by ex-factory employees, using everything except the original engine. I had the same thought in the 90s'.

added:
Of course you would have to deal with the fenderwell fillers. On my car, I dropped the frame spacer shims at the core support almost 1.5" and recently added the cc655 springs...

68607

StudeCat
11-16-2017, 06:43 AM
That's what I was thinking. For the engine, remove the Avanti II motor mounts, and use the Stude mount locations just waiting there on the frame.

Gunslinger
11-16-2017, 07:06 AM
There were actually fewer Avanti II cars manufactured than Studebaker Avantis...somewhat more than 3500 post-Studebaker Avantis vs. 4643 Studebaker Avantis. Maybe the question should be since Studebaker Avantis are available they should be used to keep an Avanti II on the road? :woot:

spokejr
11-16-2017, 08:27 AM
Dear God Bruce! One would think that your signature is truth in advertising! :lol:

All the same, I actually agree. The historical record of how tastes could be so wild through those 20 years are wiped out when the Milan Brown paint becomes Chrome Yellow and the gold patterned, silk like fabric is lost for leather. Or how about silver paint and avacado green fabric and green high-low shag? The sad part...I actually thought those two were very cool!

Silverplate
11-16-2017, 09:24 AM
Idea: Drop a Studebaker V8 in an Avanti II in place of the original Chevy motor...

Why?

1. Avantis with factory Stude power are valuable and cherished. Swapping out an original motor would be sacrilege to many.

2. Avanti IIs are available. These Chevy-powered cars could be more affordable project cars than the original ones. Substantial modifications like engine swaps could be made with less guilt.

3. I have a 289 project engine in need of a car.

Is this crazy talk? Has anyone done this before?

I totally understand your idea here. The car will not be worth more when your done and probably less. Keep your spare engine for another project and enjoy your Avanti II for what it is.

PackardV8
11-16-2017, 10:53 AM
February is coming early this year.

No, don't do it. Hard as it is to say this, the Avanti II with the SBC is a better car in every way than it would be with a Stude V8 transplant.

Before someone chimes in, yes, some of the later Avanti II with the 305"s were wimps, but for $2500, I can built a rompin', stompin' 350" SBC which will run circles around a $4,000 Stude V8.

jack vines

jack vines

swvalcon
11-16-2017, 12:02 PM
Just what Jack said WHY!!!!. You can build a very street able 350 or 383 small block that will make over 400 hp in street trim and run on pump gas. Try that with a Stude V8 plus cost would kill you.

Jessie J.
11-16-2017, 01:09 PM
"All things being equal ..." but these are not. If you really really want Studebaker power, well OK, its your car, your money. But if you want what will produce the best drive-ability, performance, and resale value, you cannot go wrong with the most popular performance V-8 ever produced, and is the actual engine family Avanti ll's employed.
The original Studebaker Avanti is an antique car, a classic museum piece treasure.
The Avanti ll, not so much. And with its SBC power, can easily and economically built to run rings around the original antiques.
All a matter of what you want. Just be aware and recognize that there are significant downsides when choosing going backwards and against the grain. Putting a Stude V-8 in it will never elevate it into being other than what it was born as.

All that said, I wouldn't hesitate to get the nose back down where it belongs, as I despise the ungainly jacked up front that was imposed on this classic design.

PackardV8
11-16-2017, 02:12 PM
"All things being equal ..." but these are not. If you really really want Studebaker power, well OK, its your car, your money. But if you want what will produce the best drive-ability, performance, and resale value, you cannot go wrong with the most popular performance V-8 ever produced, and is the actual engine family Avanti ll's employed.
The original Studebaker Avanti is an antique car, a classic museum piece treasure.
The Avanti ll, not so much. And with its SBC power, can easily and economically built to run rings around the original antiques.
All a matter of what you want. Just be aware and recognize that there are significant downsides when choosing going backwards and against the grain. Putting a Stude V-8 in it will never elevate it into being other than what it was born as.

All that said, I wouldn't hesitate to get the nose back down where it belongs, as I despise the ungainly jacked up front that was imposed on this classic design.

Agree completely, JessieJ. We owe the Altman brothers an unpayable debt for saving the Avanti, but points deducted for destroying the integrity of the design by raising the nose.

jack vines

Gunslinger
11-16-2017, 03:14 PM
All the same, I actually agree. The historical record of how tastes could be so wild through those 20 years are wiped out when the Milan Brown paint becomes Chrome Yellow and the gold patterned, silk like fabric is lost for leather. Or how about silver paint and avacado green fabric and green high-low shag? The sad part...I actually thought those two were very cool!

My '70 is an example. When I purchased it in 2006 it sported an Earl Sheib quality paint job in silver. According to the production sheet it was originally in a Cadillac brown, with brown steering wheel, steering column and walnut dash and console trim, mahogany vinyl upholstery and an orange shag carpet! My wife said the '70s weren't known as the tasteless decade without reason.

Once the car went through thorough reconstruction the exterior and interior are much, much more pleasant to look at.

avanti-hawk
11-16-2017, 04:02 PM
I would stick with SBC power in the Avanti II. Much easier to live with finance wise and very dependable. I for one like the Avanti II's. My old one was a very nice silver with black fabric interior. Why do I like them? Cant afford a Stude Avanti. Besides the II series cars still have the Studebaker vibe. They have that kinda "homebuilt" feel that Studebakers seem to possess when compared to same age Detroit iron.
I'd trade my 63 GT Hawk for a decent Avanti I or II

bezhawk
11-16-2017, 07:40 PM
You could always put in a 425 Olds. Like in Petersons book of Engine Swapping #2 (1968)

R3 challenger
11-16-2017, 08:04 PM
I was the head of the Avanti judging team at the SDC International Meet in Estes Park, Colorado, in 1987. As we were judging the later Avantis, we came across a nicely-done installation of an R1 in an Avanti II. So this idea has been done before. Somebody jokingly suggested that we give authenticity bonus points to that car. Of course, we didn't, but it sure was a nice car.

George

avanti-hawk
11-16-2017, 08:11 PM
You could always put in a 425 Olds. Like in Petersons book of Engine Swapping #2 (1968)

Always keep an open mind! Old school engine swaps can teach some fundamental tactics for new age Studebaker owners!!!

studegary
11-16-2017, 08:59 PM
I was the head of the Avanti judging team at the SDC International Meet in Estes Park, Colorado, in 1987. As we were judging the later Avantis, we came across a nicely-done installation of an R1 in an Avanti II. So this idea has been done before. Somebody jokingly suggested that we give authenticity bonus points to that car. Of course, we didn't, but it sure was a nice car.

George

Off topic, but that mention of Estes Pak brings back memories. Wayne F. and I stayed up all night "adjusting" all of the Avanti judging. I don't remember if we were making AOAI judging fit SDC judging or the other way around.

EDIT: Strange, but I just realized that I bought a new 1987 Avanti after that.

Buzzard
11-17-2017, 11:32 AM
Being the owner of both a 1970 (Nate's) and a 1983 I am somewhat insulted, but don't worry I have tough skin. I agree with Jack and Jessie as I have always coveted the fact that so few (both II's as well as simply Avanti) were built. If my source is correct, 109 70's and 212 '83's is the total production by hand. My '83 is the last of the chrome bumpers and with the rich leather Recaro interior, it is very luxurious. I also like the later urethane bumper cars as well as they too are unique. I'm in the process of "upgrading" the power plants in both cars to suit my personal taste. A blown 355 CID in the '70 with a Doug Nash 5 Speed and 406 CID Auto in the '83 as yes, Jack that 305 is very anemic. It did however meet emissions in a very strangled era. Good luck in whatever route you choose to go as the options are pretty much unlimited.
Bill

studegary
11-17-2017, 07:14 PM
Being the owner of both a 1970 (Nate's) and a 1983 I am somewhat insulted, but don't worry I have tough skin. I agree with Jack and Jessie as I have always coveted the fact that so few (both II's as well as simply Avanti) were built. If my source is correct, 109 70's and 212 '83's is the total production by hand. My '83 is the last of the chrome bumpers and with the rich leather Recaro interior, it is very luxurious. I also like the later urethane bumper cars as well as they too are unique. I'm in the process of "upgrading" the power plants in both cars to suit my personal taste. A blown 355 CID in the '70 with a Doug Nash 5 Speed and 406 CID Auto in the '83 as yes, Jack that 305 is very anemic. It did however meet emissions in a very strangled era. Good luck in whatever route you choose to go as the options are pretty much unlimited.
Bill

I agree with your 212 number for 1983. I believe that there were 207 1970 models (not "109"). 1970 models were split between the last RQA models and the first RQB models.

Buzzard
11-18-2017, 12:20 PM
Thanks for the correction Gary. Mine is an RQA and I forgot about the changeover to RQB.
Bill