PDA

View Full Version : Don't you wish you had the money...



BobPalma
01-23-2008, 06:48 AM
...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh....:) BP

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1948-PACKARD-CUSTOM-8-CONVERTIBLE-VICTORIA_W0QQitemZ330206079023QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item330206079023

JRoberts
01-23-2008, 07:33 AM
You are right Bob, one absolutely gorgeous automobile.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

JRoberts
01-23-2008, 07:33 AM
You are right Bob, one absolutely gorgeous automobile.

Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

8E45E
01-23-2008, 07:57 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh....:) BP



Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard converitbles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

Craig

8E45E
01-23-2008, 07:57 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh....:) BP



Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard converitbles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

Craig

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 08:21 AM
quote:Originally posted by 8E45E


quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh....:) BP



Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard convertibles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

Craig


:) Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.

However, most of the convertibles were the lower-priced Super series with the 5-main-bearing 327 engine. Supers had a 120" wheelbase, and 4,750 copies of the convertible were shipped.

These Customs had the cream-smooth, nine-main-bearing 356 engine and a longer [127"] wheelbase. But only 1,103 Customs were manufactured. [V]

Both engines had the same 3 1/2" bore, but the 356 had 4 additional main bearings and a stroke 3/8" longer than the 327. :D BP

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 08:21 AM
quote:Originally posted by 8E45E


quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

...to put something this beautiful in your garage?

Who says the industry didn't make elegant cars outside the normal classic period of the 1930s? If this doesn't exude postwar class, I don't know what does. Take a moment to look at the detail photos in this listing, then exhale s-l-o-w-l-y on your way back down to earth. Sigh....:) BP



Bob, that exterior color must have been rather popular. At a car show here a number of years ago, there were two pregnant elephant Packard convertibles in the exact same color as that one on Ebay!![:0]

Craig


:) Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.

However, most of the convertibles were the lower-priced Super series with the 5-main-bearing 327 engine. Supers had a 120" wheelbase, and 4,750 copies of the convertible were shipped.

These Customs had the cream-smooth, nine-main-bearing 356 engine and a longer [127"] wheelbase. But only 1,103 Customs were manufactured. [V]

Both engines had the same 3 1/2" bore, but the 356 had 4 additional main bearings and a stroke 3/8" longer than the 327. :D BP

N8N
01-23-2008, 08:28 AM
I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

N8N
01-23-2008, 08:28 AM
I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

8E45E
01-23-2008, 08:38 AM
quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!


I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

Craig

8E45E
01-23-2008, 08:38 AM
quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!


I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

Craig

Dick Steinkamp
01-23-2008, 09:18 AM
quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.



Same with me Nate. Almost NON styling to me.

I DO lust after the model that preceded the 48's however...

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/14/14326503_ee2782eab5_o.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
01-23-2008, 09:18 AM
quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s! It's quite a nice car, but the styling does absolutely nothing for me.



Same with me Nate. Almost NON styling to me.

I DO lust after the model that preceded the 48's however...

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/14/14326503_ee2782eab5_o.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s66/ddstnkmp/54%20starlight/HiResS2Dsig2.jpg

Scott
01-23-2008, 09:25 AM
Yes, Dick. Those Clippers are the way to go!

Scott
01-23-2008, 09:25 AM
Yes, Dick. Those Clippers are the way to go!

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:41 AM
:) Yes and no, Nate and Craig. The 1948-1950 "bathtub" or "pregnant elephant" Packards had been well-received and sold well. Part of that was due to the postwar seller's market, and part was due to the fact that Packard again had a large, prestigious car. That's not to say the 1951s weren't welcomed, Nate; the earlier design had certainly run its course against the newer GM products with which it was competing. [:I]

[}:)] OTOH, Craig is correct: Production timeliness and quality control were terrible in 1955. The Torsion-Level Suspension and new V-8s didn't cause that much trouble, Craig, but the revised Ultramatic, now called Twin-Ultramatic, was not up to the job of harnessing and delivering the new V-8s torque with any level of dependability. And overall quality was 'way short of Packard customer expectations. (Think Cadillac in the early 1980s.) :(

;) Remember, my Dad was a franchised Packard dealer from June 15, 1953 through July 31, 1956. He and his brother eagerly awaited the new '55s, finally with a V-8 and the smooth new Torsion-Level, but the cars were impossibly slow coming. They didn't receive their very first 1955 Packard of any type (Packard or Clipper) until late January or early February 1955!

The Chevrolet/Cadillac dealer in Paris IL was almost next door to Dad and Uncle Milt, on the same side of East Court Street, separated only by a small bar (The Court Club). How many 1955 Cadillacs and 1955 Buicks and Oldsmobiles do you think those other local dealers had delivered by the time a customer could actually walk into Palma Motors and see a new 1955 Packard? :(

Dad has many times recalled a certain sale they lost. One of their established Packard customers came in during Christmas time 1954, wanting to see the new Packards. Their son was home from college and they intended to buy a new car while he was home. Dad had nothing to show them; not one new 1955 Packard in late December 1954: He was yet to receive the first one and had no promise of when he would. A week later, he saw that couple and their son driving around town in a new, 1955 Buick. [xx(]

Whaddya' gonna do? [8D] BP

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:41 AM
:) Yes and no, Nate and Craig. The 1948-1950 "bathtub" or "pregnant elephant" Packards had been well-received and sold well. Part of that was due to the postwar seller's market, and part was due to the fact that Packard again had a large, prestigious car. That's not to say the 1951s weren't welcomed, Nate; the earlier design had certainly run its course against the newer GM products with which it was competing. [:I]

[}:)] OTOH, Craig is correct: Production timeliness and quality control were terrible in 1955. The Torsion-Level Suspension and new V-8s didn't cause that much trouble, Craig, but the revised Ultramatic, now called Twin-Ultramatic, was not up to the job of harnessing and delivering the new V-8s torque with any level of dependability. And overall quality was 'way short of Packard customer expectations. (Think Cadillac in the early 1980s.) :(

;) Remember, my Dad was a franchised Packard dealer from June 15, 1953 through July 31, 1956. He and his brother eagerly awaited the new '55s, finally with a V-8 and the smooth new Torsion-Level, but the cars were impossibly slow coming. They didn't receive their very first 1955 Packard of any type (Packard or Clipper) until late January or early February 1955!

The Chevrolet/Cadillac dealer in Paris IL was almost next door to Dad and Uncle Milt, on the same side of East Court Street, separated only by a small bar (The Court Club). How many 1955 Cadillacs and 1955 Buicks and Oldsmobiles do you think those other local dealers had delivered by the time a customer could actually walk into Palma Motors and see a new 1955 Packard? :(

Dad has many times recalled a certain sale they lost. One of their established Packard customers came in during Christmas time 1954, wanting to see the new Packards. Their son was home from college and they intended to buy a new car while he was home. Dad had nothing to show them; not one new 1955 Packard in late December 1954: He was yet to receive the first one and had no promise of when he would. A week later, he saw that couple and their son driving around town in a new, 1955 Buick. [xx(]

Whaddya' gonna do? [8D] BP

jimmijim8
01-23-2008, 09:54 AM
I have a grille ornament just like that one. I'm off to a great start. jimmijim

jimmijim8
01-23-2008, 09:54 AM
I have a grille ornament just like that one. I'm off to a great start. jimmijim

studeclunker
01-23-2008, 12:22 PM
quote:...to put something this beautiful in your garage?


DAILY, my friend, daily...[:I]

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

studeclunker
01-23-2008, 12:22 PM
quote:...to put something this beautiful in your garage?


DAILY, my friend, daily...[:I]

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

Studedude1961
01-23-2008, 01:30 PM
1941-1947 Packard Clippers were, in my eyes stylewise, American Rolls-Royce. Just a dead-on beautiful design. The facelifted 1948-1950 models, while not my favorite Packards by a long stretch, do tend to grow on one as the years go by.

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

Studedude1961
01-23-2008, 01:30 PM
1941-1947 Packard Clippers were, in my eyes stylewise, American Rolls-Royce. Just a dead-on beautiful design. The facelifted 1948-1950 models, while not my favorite Packards by a long stretch, do tend to grow on one as the years go by.

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

glen
01-23-2008, 02:30 PM
Course, as the wise person once said: "Beauty is in the eye of the
beholder" and this "beholder" believes it's down right beautiful!

glen Brose - Perkinsville, AZ
http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g204/glen_05/Studebakersign.jpg

glen
01-23-2008, 02:30 PM
Course, as the wise person once said: "Beauty is in the eye of the
beholder" and this "beholder" believes it's down right beautiful!

glen Brose - Perkinsville, AZ
http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g204/glen_05/Studebakersign.jpg

N8N
01-23-2008, 02:39 PM
quote:Originally posted by 8E45E


quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!


I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

Craig


yabbut, it shares with the STudebaker pickup the distinction that it was so good that the russians had to copy it! My comment is of course solely about styling.

I sometimes wish that I'd bought that $4K Clipper that was at York a couple years ago...

nate


--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

N8N
01-23-2008, 02:39 PM
quote:Originally posted by 8E45E


quote:Originally posted by N8N

I guess I'll have to be the heathen and chime in and say that I'll bet that Packard dealers heaved a huge collective sigh of relief when the 51's came out, and an even bigger one with the '55s!


I don't know if I would have wanted to be a Packard dealer in 1955![:0] As nice as the senior line was, it was LATE getting to the dealers, long after the rest of the industry's new car introduction time. They involved a LOT more "dealer prep" to make it presentable, and the dealers had to iron out all the kinks in the new suspension system, Twin-Ultraumatic, and all the other teething problems those cars had.[B)]

Craig


yabbut, it shares with the STudebaker pickup the distinction that it was so good that the russians had to copy it! My comment is of course solely about styling.

I sometimes wish that I'd bought that $4K Clipper that was at York a couple years ago...

nate


--
55 Commander Starlight
http://members.cox.net/njnagel

studegary
01-23-2008, 03:59 PM
Bob, this is one place where we differ in opinion. I do not like that series of Packard. I would give him $8K for it, but not the additional $100K. It got 222 points a few years ago (out of how many possible points?). I didn't read his whole listing, but got turned off by the mistakes in the ad for the price that he wants (opening bid at that). Things like; "limosine" (sic), "manuel 3 speed" (does he come with the car?) and "done very very correctly" (followed by; "base coat clear coat").

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

studegary
01-23-2008, 03:59 PM
Bob, this is one place where we differ in opinion. I do not like that series of Packard. I would give him $8K for it, but not the additional $100K. It got 222 points a few years ago (out of how many possible points?). I didn't read his whole listing, but got turned off by the mistakes in the ad for the price that he wants (opening bid at that). Things like; "limosine" (sic), "manuel 3 speed" (does he come with the car?) and "done very very correctly" (followed by; "base coat clear coat").

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

bams50
01-23-2008, 04:02 PM
Count me as one who LOVES the subject car!! I have a 54 Packard Super Clipper; while I love the way that straight 8 sounds, I've never been thrilled by the styling[|)]

There was a 50? Packard sedan for sale at Reedsville this last year; gorgeous and for sale![:p][:X] What a doll!!

I can't believe I didn't get a picture, but every time I tried, the car was surrounded by admirers... I bet Leonard got one;)

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

bams50
01-23-2008, 04:02 PM
Count me as one who LOVES the subject car!! I have a 54 Packard Super Clipper; while I love the way that straight 8 sounds, I've never been thrilled by the styling[|)]

There was a 50? Packard sedan for sale at Reedsville this last year; gorgeous and for sale![:p][:X] What a doll!!

I can't believe I didn't get a picture, but every time I tried, the car was surrounded by admirers... I bet Leonard got one;)

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

Gordy911
01-23-2008, 04:15 PM
No windshield wipers and no pictures of the engine probably has no hold down on the battery just a tarp strap.

62 GT Hawk
84 vette
31 Ford Pickup
2005 Maxima
2006 CTSV
Gravely 17hp Pro
Gravely Walker 10HP

Gordy911
01-23-2008, 04:15 PM
No windshield wipers and no pictures of the engine probably has no hold down on the battery just a tarp strap.

62 GT Hawk
84 vette
31 Ford Pickup
2005 Maxima
2006 CTSV
Gravely 17hp Pro
Gravely Walker 10HP

60ragtop
01-23-2008, 07:12 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) [}:)] [b]
;) Remember, my Dad was a franchised Packard dealer from June 15, 1953 through July 31, 1956. He and his brother eagerly awaited the new '55s, finally with a V-8 and the smooth new Torsion-Level, but the cars were impossibly slow coming. They didn't receive their [b]very first 1955 Packard of any type (Packard [i]or Clipper) until late January or early February 1955!



Bob:

Do you know the reason for Packard being late to introduce the '55s? Did it have to do with a distraction from the acquisition of Studebaker, or was it ironing out engineering and production problems? BTW, count me among those who feel the 48-50 models were an unfortunate redesign of the 41-47 Clippers. It also seems that the '51s, while a pleasant enough restyling, weren't enough to win buyers away from Cadillac. Packard still had the straight 8 and introduced a junior 200 series that seemed to cheapen the whole line. Chrysler and Lincoln introduced OHV v-8s in '51 and '52, and Lincoln was redesigned in '52 and Cadillac in '54, which advanced both marques to Packards disadvantage. I think the rather stodgy styling and dated engineering in the post-war years was the main reason for Packard's demise rather than the acquisition of Studebaker as is often alleged by Packard fans. When Packard finally came out with an OHV V-8, torsion bars, and sharp styling in '55 it was too late, and Packard was competing against newly designed Chryslers and Imperials, and a still freshly (one year old) redesigned Cadillac, Buick and Oldsmobile. As you say, the delay in introducing these models compounded the sales problem, and a year and a half later, Packard was for all intents and purposes, history.

Frank Philippi
56 President Classic
60 Lark Vonvertible
62 GT Hawk

60ragtop
01-23-2008, 07:12 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) [}:)] [b]
;) Remember, my Dad was a franchised Packard dealer from June 15, 1953 through July 31, 1956. He and his brother eagerly awaited the new '55s, finally with a V-8 and the smooth new Torsion-Level, but the cars were impossibly slow coming. They didn't receive their [b]very first 1955 Packard of any type (Packard [i]or Clipper) until late January or early February 1955!



Bob:

Do you know the reason for Packard being late to introduce the '55s? Did it have to do with a distraction from the acquisition of Studebaker, or was it ironing out engineering and production problems? BTW, count me among those who feel the 48-50 models were an unfortunate redesign of the 41-47 Clippers. It also seems that the '51s, while a pleasant enough restyling, weren't enough to win buyers away from Cadillac. Packard still had the straight 8 and introduced a junior 200 series that seemed to cheapen the whole line. Chrysler and Lincoln introduced OHV v-8s in '51 and '52, and Lincoln was redesigned in '52 and Cadillac in '54, which advanced both marques to Packards disadvantage. I think the rather stodgy styling and dated engineering in the post-war years was the main reason for Packard's demise rather than the acquisition of Studebaker as is often alleged by Packard fans. When Packard finally came out with an OHV V-8, torsion bars, and sharp styling in '55 it was too late, and Packard was competing against newly designed Chryslers and Imperials, and a still freshly (one year old) redesigned Cadillac, Buick and Oldsmobile. As you say, the delay in introducing these models compounded the sales problem, and a year and a half later, Packard was for all intents and purposes, history.

Frank Philippi
56 President Classic
60 Lark Vonvertible
62 GT Hawk

8E45E
01-23-2008, 07:45 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.



Thanks for the info, Bob, but it was the color in addition to it being a convertible as well. Here is a pic of one of the two near-identical Packards at the meet and the interior shot of the other one. (I was unable to get a good exterior shot of the second one.) What I was suggesting is this color whatever Packard called it (Cool Kidney Beans Metallic?), must have been common to the convertibles like Jonquil Yellow on a '60 Lark convertible!![:0]:)[^]

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2251/2214995037_ab2d9d3975_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2126/2214996365_c556babc81_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2091/2215790144_5658a174f2_b.jpg

Craig

8E45E
01-23-2008, 07:45 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Craig: The proportion of 1948 Packard convertibles was actually rather high when compared with total cars produced.



Thanks for the info, Bob, but it was the color in addition to it being a convertible as well. Here is a pic of one of the two near-identical Packards at the meet and the interior shot of the other one. (I was unable to get a good exterior shot of the second one.) What I was suggesting is this color whatever Packard called it (Cool Kidney Beans Metallic?), must have been common to the convertibles like Jonquil Yellow on a '60 Lark convertible!![:0]:)[^]

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2251/2214995037_ab2d9d3975_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2126/2214996365_c556babc81_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2091/2215790144_5658a174f2_b.jpg

Craig

556063
01-23-2008, 08:03 PM
Since Packard evolved as a custom bodied prestige marque, it never owned it's own body making plant. When the company introduced the less expensive six cylinder One Twenty Series cars in the mid '30's, it turned to Briggs Body Works for the resulting surge in production. With the disappearance of the custom bodied "Super" luxury marques in the 1930's, that pretty much left Packard and Briggs joined at the hip from the 1940's and forward. When Chrysler purchased Briggs as a whole in 1953, that left Packard in a real world of hurt.

I tried a Google News search on Chrysler Briggs. The little date search bar on the left side of the screen usually goes by decade, but this search has a 1953-54 category, with quite a selection of LA Times and New York Times articles available to read at $3.95 a pop relating to the Chrysler/Briggs purchase. If I had unlimited time and money, I'd try to read every one. I can't, and this is one area of corporate history I haven't studied extensively. But, I will construct an educated guess as to why the Chrysler/Briggs acquisition took place, and why Packard had trouble introducing cars on time during these years.

Packard's One Twenty Series was highly successful in the mid 30's. Packards were now selling in the same price category as Buicks and Chryslers. This drew the attention of the Big Three. I would guess that the relationship between Briggs and Packard was friendly, but underneath was like that of a couple that had been dating for fifteen years, but no talk of an engagement ring was in sight. Packard, due to either lack of resources or lack of forsight, had left their flank exposed by becoming so dependent on Briggs. Chrysler's management saw and exploited the weakness, and closed the back door on Packard.

The same reason Packard couldn't get a car out on time may be the same reason the Avanti stumbled out of the blocks. Just as Moulded Fiberglass knew they'd better keep GM's new 1963 Corvette at the top of the priority list, I'm sure Briggs gave Chrysler preferential treatment, and may have actually been instructed to do so after Chrysler closed the deal to own them in 1953.

Kevin Wolford
Plymouth, IN

55 Champion
60 Lark VI Conv.
63 Avanti R1

556063
01-23-2008, 08:03 PM
Since Packard evolved as a custom bodied prestige marque, it never owned it's own body making plant. When the company introduced the less expensive six cylinder One Twenty Series cars in the mid '30's, it turned to Briggs Body Works for the resulting surge in production. With the disappearance of the custom bodied "Super" luxury marques in the 1930's, that pretty much left Packard and Briggs joined at the hip from the 1940's and forward. When Chrysler purchased Briggs as a whole in 1953, that left Packard in a real world of hurt.

I tried a Google News search on Chrysler Briggs. The little date search bar on the left side of the screen usually goes by decade, but this search has a 1953-54 category, with quite a selection of LA Times and New York Times articles available to read at $3.95 a pop relating to the Chrysler/Briggs purchase. If I had unlimited time and money, I'd try to read every one. I can't, and this is one area of corporate history I haven't studied extensively. But, I will construct an educated guess as to why the Chrysler/Briggs acquisition took place, and why Packard had trouble introducing cars on time during these years.

Packard's One Twenty Series was highly successful in the mid 30's. Packards were now selling in the same price category as Buicks and Chryslers. This drew the attention of the Big Three. I would guess that the relationship between Briggs and Packard was friendly, but underneath was like that of a couple that had been dating for fifteen years, but no talk of an engagement ring was in sight. Packard, due to either lack of resources or lack of forsight, had left their flank exposed by becoming so dependent on Briggs. Chrysler's management saw and exploited the weakness, and closed the back door on Packard.

The same reason Packard couldn't get a car out on time may be the same reason the Avanti stumbled out of the blocks. Just as Moulded Fiberglass knew they'd better keep GM's new 1963 Corvette at the top of the priority list, I'm sure Briggs gave Chrysler preferential treatment, and may have actually been instructed to do so after Chrysler closed the deal to own them in 1953.

Kevin Wolford
Plymouth, IN

55 Champion
60 Lark VI Conv.
63 Avanti R1

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:00 PM
:) Frank Philippi: Kevin Wolford jumped in with most of the answer as to Packard's 1955 production problems: Having to build their own bodies for the first time, with Briggs no longer able to supply them due to being owned by Chrysler. :( (Thanks, Kevin; your post is certainly correct.)

Other factors included setting up an all-new assembly line at the too-small Conner Avenue plant and teething problems with the heavily-revised Twin-Ultramatic, which really needed further development before it was cleared for takeoff. [V]

They simply tried to do too many things in one model year. (Which is really too bad; the cars themselves, when assembled and operating as intended, are wonderful machines. Our late-production 1956 Clipper Super hardtop is testimony to that; a joy to drive.) :D BP

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:00 PM
:) Frank Philippi: Kevin Wolford jumped in with most of the answer as to Packard's 1955 production problems: Having to build their own bodies for the first time, with Briggs no longer able to supply them due to being owned by Chrysler. :( (Thanks, Kevin; your post is certainly correct.)

Other factors included setting up an all-new assembly line at the too-small Conner Avenue plant and teething problems with the heavily-revised Twin-Ultramatic, which really needed further development before it was cleared for takeoff. [V]

They simply tried to do too many things in one model year. (Which is really too bad; the cars themselves, when assembled and operating as intended, are wonderful machines. Our late-production 1956 Clipper Super hardtop is testimony to that; a joy to drive.) :D BP

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:09 PM
quote:Originally posted by Gordy911

No windshield wipers and no pictures of the engine probably has no hold down on the battery just a tarp strap.

62 GT Hawk
84 vette
31 Ford Pickup
2005 Maxima
2006 CTSV
Gravely 17hp Pro
Gravely Walker 10HP


[?] Gordy: The subject car in the link does have windshield wipers, and a correct battery hold-down is easily visible in the single under-hood picture. I wonder if you somehow got the wrong link? :D BP

BobPalma
01-23-2008, 09:09 PM
quote:Originally posted by Gordy911

No windshield wipers and no pictures of the engine probably has no hold down on the battery just a tarp strap.

62 GT Hawk
84 vette
31 Ford Pickup
2005 Maxima
2006 CTSV
Gravely 17hp Pro
Gravely Walker 10HP


[?] Gordy: The subject car in the link does have windshield wipers, and a correct battery hold-down is easily visible in the single under-hood picture. I wonder if you somehow got the wrong link? :D BP

Guido
01-23-2008, 09:38 PM
Remember that Packard was the only independent car company to develop their own automatic transmission and that it consumed a vast amount of their capital. I once heard on the order of $50 million in total, but that seems far too high.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/62/562/2/21/69/2353221690097493054hwathP_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/60/460/3/91/1/2433391010097493054nAMBKh_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/2/49/65/2603249650097493054XvpTUI_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/64/564/6/89/77/2752689770097493054skXzAT_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/5/22/8/2609522080097493054ZNRJeA_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/69/169/4/66/56/2729466560097493054oBZsXT_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
01-23-2008, 09:38 PM
Remember that Packard was the only independent car company to develop their own automatic transmission and that it consumed a vast amount of their capital. I once heard on the order of $50 million in total, but that seems far too high.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/62/562/2/21/69/2353221690097493054hwathP_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/60/460/3/91/1/2433391010097493054nAMBKh_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/2/49/65/2603249650097493054XvpTUI_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/64/564/6/89/77/2752689770097493054skXzAT_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/5/22/8/2609522080097493054ZNRJeA_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/69/169/4/66/56/2729466560097493054oBZsXT_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Roscomacaw
01-23-2008, 10:12 PM
I love it! It's worth every penny of the BIN!;)[:p]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
01-23-2008, 10:12 PM
I love it! It's worth every penny of the BIN!;)[:p]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

55s
01-23-2008, 11:37 PM
I have a nice maroon/cream top 48 4 door Packard. They ride very nicely and its sooooo quiet. Its a little difficult getting used to that huge hood in front though.

Paul

55s
01-23-2008, 11:37 PM
I have a nice maroon/cream top 48 4 door Packard. They ride very nicely and its sooooo quiet. Its a little difficult getting used to that huge hood in front though.

Paul