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dleroux
09-21-2017, 02:39 PM
A sales guy stopped by & was looking at my '63 Avanti & said he remembers a neighbor who had a sliding roof Wagonaire back in the '60's. He said he thought it had a push button transmission. Sorry, but I'm not as knowledgeable about transmission options for Studebakers back in the '60's, other than Avantis, so I said I'd post the question. Am I showing my total lack of knowledge on this subject in which case I apologize to those who might be offended. I just figured I'd appeal to the historical collective knowledge of the "wiser" ones.
Thanks

53k
09-21-2017, 02:57 PM
A sales guy stopped by & was looking at my '63 Avanti & said he remembers a neighbor who had a sliding roof Wagonaire back in the '60's. He said he thought it had a push button transmission. Sorry, but I'm not as knowledgeable about transmission options for Studebakers back in the '60's, other than Avantis, so I said I'd post the question. Am I showing my total lack of knowledge on this subject in which case I apologize to those who might be offended. I just figured I'd appeal to the historical collective knowledge of the "wiser" ones.
Thanks
Chrysler cars (Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto and Chrysler) used push-button automatic transmission shifters starting in 1956. They used them for a few years, but I don't remember when they went back to conventional shifters. Several other cars offered them at one time or another (Packard, Edsel). Studebaker? Never.

Blue 15G
09-21-2017, 03:00 PM
Ramblers owned by my uncle and grandfather had pushbutton automatics, these were 1959 and 1962 models. Not sure when Rambler went back to the column shifter. In any case, the person you spoke with was probably confusing Studebaker with Rambler, which isn't the first time this has happened, lol.

Commander Eddie
09-21-2017, 03:00 PM
I am sure Studebaker never used push buttons for their automatics. I did have a 1956 Packard with an electronic push button transmission. It was wonderful. Wish Studebaker HAD used them. But, no.

64studeavanti
09-21-2017, 03:50 PM
I believe Rambler used push buttons. May he is confusing the Wagonaire with a Rambler stayion wagon.

rbruner
09-21-2017, 03:55 PM
My neighbor had a pushbutton tranny in his 63 Nova. It hung loose under the dash because his car had a Mopar transplant.

BobPalma
09-21-2017, 03:57 PM
:) To answer the immediate question: No, Studebaker didn't have any push-button shifters. The closest would have been the electric push-button shifters on Studebaker-Packard Corporation-built 1956 Packards and Clippers.

As others have said, people have confused Studebaker with Rambler and MoPar. Many people think Rambler and Studebaker are the same company anyway! :eek: ;) :cool: BP

8E45E
09-21-2017, 04:52 PM
:) To answer the immediate question: No, Studebaker didn't have any push-button shifters.

Exactly! http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?89983-STUDE-Push-Button-Transmission&highlight=pushbutton

Craig

JimK
09-21-2017, 11:58 PM
The last year for push button transmission in Mopars was 1964. Probably more than one reason for the change, but I vaguely remember some mention of government (no necessarily the Feds) requiring PRND21 shifters for fleet orders as a standardization issue.

dleroux
09-22-2017, 08:50 AM
Thanks for the history lesson & I'll pass along the "correct" information. I always "learn" something new at each car event. Two weeks ago a guy walks up to me and asks, "What year did they quit making the Avanti in Germany?" Huh?
Sunday is the Snohomish meet & who knows what I'll learn there.

RadioRoy
09-22-2017, 10:47 AM
Thanks for the history lesson & I'll pass along the "correct" information.

Good luck with that. Let us know how it goes.

53k
09-22-2017, 12:34 PM
Push button shifters aren't exactly new. The 1914 Norwalk Underslung had an electric gear shifter mounted on the right side of the steering column. You can see the pushbuttons in the mirror against the right door.

Noxnabaker
09-22-2017, 12:34 PM
Answering the guy about what year they quit making Avanti's in Germany I'd answer "1961!"... ;)

dleroux
09-22-2017, 01:02 PM
I like it. I'll keep it in mind the next time I'm asked. At another event a guy walks by with his young son in hand & says, "That's one of those cars that goes in the water." "Not intentionally," I answered.

8E45E
09-22-2017, 01:10 PM
Push button shifters aren't exactly new. The 1914 Norwalk Underslung had an electric gear shifter mounted on the right side of the steering column. You can see the pushbuttons in the mirror against the right door.

So did the 1918 Premier. The shift mechanism was made by Cutler-Hammer.

Craig

Mike Van Veghten
09-22-2017, 03:01 PM
Here ya go...for most any automatic trans.

http://www.jegs.com/p/Altronics/Altronics-SHIFT-Electric-Push-Button-Shifter-System/1979277/10002/-1

Mike

kurtruk
09-25-2017, 12:55 AM
RE: Push button transmission...no one mentioned the Edsel?:ohmy:

8E45E
09-25-2017, 06:22 AM
RE: Push button transmission...no one mentioned the Edsel?:ohmy:

Refer to the link in Post #8.

Craig

53k
09-25-2017, 07:25 AM
RE: Push button transmission...no one mentioned the Edsel?:ohmy:
I mentioned Edsel in Post #2.

kurtruk
09-25-2017, 09:16 AM
Sorry, I was up late...

acolds
09-25-2017, 10:11 AM
If you wanted one for Studebaker just find Rambler with one and install in your Studebaker as they shared the same Auto transmission

studegary
09-25-2017, 11:50 AM
If you wanted one for Studebaker just find Rambler with one and install in your Studebaker as they shared the same Auto transmission

Not true for most later years when Rambler used the lighter duty Chrysler Torqueflite.

Blue 15G
09-25-2017, 01:42 PM
Not true for most later years when Rambler used the lighter duty Chrysler Torqueflite.

Not exactly true, since AMC started using Chrysler's Torqueflite with the 1972 models, and 1969 was the last year that AMC sold a car with the "Rambler" name on it.

Although, I noticed when I worked in the automotive field a lot of mechanics still referred to AMCs as "Ramblers" years after AMC stopped using the name!

S2Deluxe
09-25-2017, 04:26 PM
A sales guy stopped by & was looking at my '63 Avanti & said he remembers a neighbor who had a sliding roof Wagonaire back in the '60's. He said he thought it had a push button transmission.

It may not have been a factory installation, but if someone was creative enough, they may have been able to do it well enough to fool a majority of the general public! At least your Sales guy at any rate?

Mark

studegary
09-25-2017, 09:19 PM
Not exactly true, since AMC started using Chrysler's Torqueflite with the 1972 models, and 1969 was the last year that AMC sold a car with the "Rambler" name on it.

Although, I noticed when I worked in the automotive field a lot of mechanics still referred to AMCs as "Ramblers" years after AMC stopped using the name!

Thanks. My FiL bought a new 1964 Rambler Ambassador. This was followed by a new 1972 Ambassador. I guess that I still consider it to be a Rambler. That was then the first year of the better Torqueflite transmission in them. People calling the later ones Ramblers is sort of like people calling 1964-1966 Studebakers Larks.

dannyo
09-26-2017, 07:25 AM
just my 2 cents worth , i have done studebakers for 50+ yrs, the borg. trans are tough but if i had a mopar torqflight to match up with a studie engine i would do it , i drove push botton mopars for years with a 318 v8 poly & a push botton thay were great wished i had one to daybut thay are out of my price range, never tore one out in street raceing got some money in my pocket to , i always said you can push a botton faster than you can slect a gear or stick on the colum , working on a 62 4speed lark now hope it comes out good enouph to keep up with the kids out there with there sooped up small cars , but i will try them any way if i dont get to many tickets lol.

Noxnabaker
09-26-2017, 12:40 PM
I've had a few pushputton MoPars, my fav was a -62 New Port we had for some years & later on I'll put one in Josephine as well!

8E45E
09-26-2017, 01:13 PM
I've had a few pushputton MoPars, my fav was a -62 New Port we had for some years & later on I'll put one in Josephine as well!

You must have seen a few Renault 10's there with pushbutton automatics.

Craig

Noxnabaker
09-26-2017, 03:01 PM
I actually owned a Renault 10 a few months in the winter 83-84 & not that I understand what you're on about Craig, but I only had the New Port, a -61 Belvedere & a -59 Windsor + some "winter-Valiants" with pushbutton trans.
Josephine has MoPar engine, gearbox & rear axel so that's no big deal to modify.
But please be my guest & show me a pic of the Renault way of it... ;)

8E45E
09-26-2017, 06:07 PM
But please be my guest & show me a pic of the Renault way of it... ;)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4505/36671084313_789ef72a26_h.jpg

Like Packard's and Edsel's, it was also a motorized shift selector.

Craig

Noxnabaker
09-27-2017, 04:07 AM
NEVER seen here, could it be possible they thought Americans couldn't drive manual gearboxes?
What do Christophe say, seen any of those in France? There ought to have been some there?

8E45E
09-27-2017, 08:37 AM
NEVER seen here, could it be possible they thought Americans couldn't drive manual gearboxes?

There is some truth to that.

Offering an automatic transmission on European and Asian imports where it wasn't common in their home markets, was an important selling feature in North America.

Craig

Dwain G.
09-27-2017, 11:07 PM
Back in the day there were a lot of Renaults around. Dauphines, Caravelles, R8s, so on. We did service a few of the push-button Dauphines. I remember replacing the brush carriers fairly often. There were three brushes that contacted slip rings on the electro-magnetic coupling.

studegary
09-28-2017, 03:00 PM
Back in the day there were a lot of Renaults around. Dauphines, Caravelles, R8s, so on. We did service a few of the push-button Dauphines. I remember replacing the brush carriers fairly often. There were three brushes that contacted slip rings on the electro-magnetic coupling.

It has been a long time (since the 1950s), but I seem to remember some sort of (problematic) electric/automatic clutch for the Renault Dauphines.

Dwain G.
09-28-2017, 04:09 PM
It has been a long time (since the 1950s), but I seem to remember some sort of (problematic) electric/automatic clutch for the Renault Dauphines.
Yes, that was the Ferlec clutch, before the automatic trans. Other makes had similar devices; Hydrak, Autostick, etc.

Chrycoman
09-29-2017, 09:06 AM
The last year for push button transmission in Mopars was 1964. Probably more than one reason for the change, but I vaguely remember some mention of government (no necessarily the Feds) requiring PRND21 shifters for fleet orders as a standardization issue.

The federal government passed a law in August 1964 that gave the man in charge of ordering cars for the US federal govenment the right to set standards for vehicles purchased. The law gave the gentleman a year to come up with a list of items. He was then to publish the list and distribute it to all persons / companies interested in bidding on supplying vehicles for the the US government. The new standards would then come into force 90 days after the list was published. I figured it all out a while back and the list would have become effective no later than November, 1966. Over two years after the 1965 models went into production with shift levers instead of buttons.

The real reason Chrysler dropped the buttons was that Chrysler owners loved them but owners of competitors' cars were hesitant about owning a car with pushbutton transmissions. Mercury used buttons in 1957-58 (as well as the Canadian 1957 Monarch) and Rambler used them from 1958 to 1962 on all models but the American. Chrysler introduced theirs in 1956 and dropped them at the end of the 1964 model year. Which undoubtedly raises another question that probably came to prospective buyers. In 1963 Chrysler became the only manufacturer to use them, so why would Mercury and Rambler drop the buttons if they were so good?

The Mercury, Monarch and Rambler all used the same button set up from Borg-Warner. Therefore S-P could have used the buttons on the 1957-58 Packard. Could have at least had one Packard item on the car, besides the Clipper wheel and tailamps.

8E45E
09-29-2017, 01:15 PM
In 1963 Chrysler became the only manufacturer to use them, so why would Mercury and Rambler drop the buttons if they were so good?

Lincoln currently uses them on all models except the MKT and the Navigator.

Craig

Blue 15G
09-29-2017, 01:27 PM
I agree with Chrycoman's explanation for Chrysler dropping the pushbutton trans. controls. Seems to me I read that somewhere else too, that Chrysler thought a more conventional shifter would attract additional buyers.