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DWillis
07-27-2017, 01:30 PM
Dear Forum Members:

I'm new to this forum.

Last year I purchased a 1957 Studebaker Commander Provincial Station Wagon from an Idaho salvage yard. I knew going in that the engine would have to be rebuilt. In my inspection, I found that the number one connecting rod had sliced through the oil pan. Not a good thing. At present, the engine is out and is 98% disassembled. The block and cylinder walls appear to be salvageable but the #1 connecting rod journal is out of round. The engine was run hard with dirty oil and the bearing seized and broke apart.

I'm trying to decide if a weld repair is the way to go or seek out a used crank that can be reconditioned with oversized bearings. The engine is a 259. Your input and experience is greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

DWillis

RadioRoy
07-27-2017, 02:01 PM
There are still NOS 259 crankshafts available at a reasonable price. There are also plenty of 232 engines around to donate their cranks. studebakervendors.com

Welcome to the forum.

64studeavanti
07-27-2017, 02:38 PM
As said, you can buy nos or there are plenty of good used. I would not weld unless that was my only choice.

Bud
07-27-2017, 04:13 PM
Buy a new crankshaft. 259 crankshafts are cheap enough and readily available. If you can find a used crankshaft that can be cleaned up at .010" under size, that will work too. If you were talking about a 289 crankshaft, they are getting hard to come by so welding could be an option on them. Bud

PackardV8
07-27-2017, 04:16 PM
X3 - junk that crank and find a good used one. Be aware some of the NOS cranks still out there are not in mint condition. The last one I saw had to be turned .010" under to be usable.

When replacing the con rod, be aware Studebaker has left and rights, so make sure to get the correct replacement.

jack vines

DieselJim
07-27-2017, 10:54 PM
NOS crank, Studebaker International, 1558011, $220.00

JoeHall
07-27-2017, 11:15 PM
NOS crank, Studebaker International, 1558011, $220.00

Jim,
Is that part number for a long snout, or short snout crank?
Thanks,
Joe

RadioRoy
07-27-2017, 11:46 PM
When replacing the con rod, be aware Studebaker has left and rights, so make sure to get the correct replacement.

jack vines

Would it be wise to replace both rods that rode on that journal?

DieselJim
07-28-2017, 06:11 AM
Jim,
Is that part number for a long snout, or short snout crank?
Thanks,
Joe
1558011 crank,1955 to early 62.

DWillis
07-28-2017, 06:38 AM
1558011 crank,1955 to early 62.

Dear Forum:

Thanks for all the suggestions. I bought a NOS Crankshaft from SI for $220.00.

Thanks to all.

DWillis

PackardV8
07-28-2017, 12:16 PM
Dear Forum:

Thanks for all the suggestions. I bought a NOS Crankshaft from SI for $220.00.

Thanks to all.

DWillis

Just for the good of the order, let us know if it's usable as is out of the box.

jack vines

tsenecal
07-28-2017, 01:18 PM
If you plan on using the connecting rods from that journal, I would have them checked and resized at a machine shop. I had a flat head Ford that had the bearing turn inside the rod, and it was torqued down that way. It spread the rod slightly, and the machine shop brought it back to specs. He called it resizing at the time.

GrumpyOne
07-28-2017, 03:51 PM
If you plan on using the connecting rods from that journal, I would have them checked and resized at a machine shop. I had a flat head Ford that had the bearing turn inside the rod, and it was torqued down that way. It spread the rod slightly, and the machine shop brought it back to specs. He called it resizing at the time.

Yep… It's important to have any rod with a spun bearing, (or worse), trued by an engine machine shop. Vitally important!

55 56 PREZ 4D
07-31-2017, 11:42 PM
You are new to the site.
Possibly new to Studebakers also, here are a several sites to stroll through for information.
http://www.studebakervendors.com/index.htm#ANCHORTOP
http://studebaker-info.org/rjvs.html
And a site with an extensive amount of Studebaker information:
http://studebaker-info.org/

Neal in NM
08-01-2017, 10:10 AM
I know this is a little too late but, I found a place that can HARD-Chrome crankshaft journals to bring them back to the original size. It wasn't cost effective in my case because the crank was too far gone but, for one journal it might be worth it. Neal

jclary
08-01-2017, 10:59 AM
Dear Forum:

Thanks for all the suggestions. I bought a NOS Crankshaft from SI for $220.00.

Thanks to all.

DWillis

David, welcome to our forum and glad you found us. Although many of us take "making something from nothing," as a challenge, in this case, your decision to buy an available NOS crankshaft elevated my view of your "newbie" wisdom.;)


I know this is a little too late but, I found a place that can HARD-Chrome crankshaft journals to bring them back to the original size. It wasn't cost effective in my case because the crank was too far gone but, for one journal it might be worth it. Neal

Neal, somewhere in the dark recesses of my fading memory, decades ago, as an industrial supply salesman, I had in my arsenal a "Brush Plating Kit," that maintenance and industrial engineers could buy for chrome plating machine shafts for the purpose of saving damaged surfaces on components that would otherwise need to be replaced. (This process is very different than "Tank" plating as used for decorative chrome) Many manufacturing operations have proprietary and unique process machinery that is very expensive, and so secret that all repairs are kept "in house." I believe some of the components were "undercut" and plated for the wear qualities of hard chrome.

Most of my applications were for straight shafts with a constant load, continuous running, and not the trauma of reciprocal operation encountered with a crankshaft. I am curious as to how a single chrome repair on a crank journal would work? How would it affect balance? How about faraday effect at the journal shoulder, since the shoulder cut needs a radius, and plating is always difficult in corners & tight radius areas?:confused: Just a few, Questions that come to mind, and the reason I am thinking David is doing the best thing by buying a new crankshaft.:)

PackardV8
08-01-2017, 11:11 AM
Neal, somewhere in the dark recesses of my fading memory, decades ago, as an industrial supply salesman, I had in my arsenal a "Brush Plating Kit," that maintenance and industrial engineers could buy for chrome plating machine shafts for the purpose of saving damaged surfaces on components that would otherwise need to be replaced. (This process is very different than "Tank" plating as used for decorative chrome) Many manufacturing operations have proprietary and unique process machinery that is very expensive, and so secret that all repairs are kept "in house." I believe some of the components were "undercut" and plated for the wear qualities of hard chrome.

Most of my applications were for straight shafts with a constant load, continuous running, and not the trauma of reciprocal operation encountered with a crankshaft. I am curious as to how a single chrome repair on a crank journal would work? How would it affect balance? How about faraday effect at the journal shoulder, since the shoulder cut needs a radius, and plating is always difficult in corners & tight radius areas?:confused: Just a few, Questions that come to mind, and the reason I am thinking David is doing the best thing by buying a new crankshaft.:)

John, agree. Industrial hard chroming is indeed a complex and labor-intensive process using regulated and inspected chemicals and only cost-effective on rare and or very expensive crankshafts. All I can say is in fifty years of engine building, I've never seen or heard of anyone recommending "brush plate" repair of a crankshaft journal.

When we can clean and regrind the plentiful 259" cranks for $150, hard chroming is not where we'd go. So yes, regrind or NOS are the best options.

jack vines

JoeHall
08-01-2017, 01:09 PM
Agree NOS crankshaft is better. But I'd hate to replace a long snout crank with a short snout, especially if running AC. Since the above part number is for a short snout, wonder if there are any NOS long snout 259 crankshafts out there?

DieselJim
08-01-2017, 02:45 PM
Agree NOS crankshaft is better. But I'd hate to replace a long snout crank with a short snout, especially if running AC. Since the above part number is for a short snout, wonder if there are any NOS long snout 259 crankshafts out there?
SI has long snout in the catalog.

Mike Van Veghten
08-01-2017, 03:07 PM
True "Hard Chroming" does indeed work well.
Overplate, grind to desired diameter. It leaves a very hard surface.

But yea, getting more expensive as time "wears" on.

Mike