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View Full Version : Engine: Ye olde valve rocker arm adjustment problems- 1955 259 V8, Presiident State



cwsimpson
07-22-2017, 02:53 PM
It might be my imagination, but I don't think so. Car is worse after valve adjustment for clicking and clacking. Actually did this twice with the same result- maybe I'm insane- doing the same thing twice and expecting different results:
1) Using remote starter, determine that #1 cylinder is coming up to UDC (thumb over #1 cylinder and wait for confirmation pressure. Set damper on UDC mark. Set #1 cylinder valves (both of 'em)- in my case .026 for both. Check gap with .026, .025 and .027. for confirmation- good slide, loose slide, tight slide respectively between rocker and valve.
2) Connect test lamp between distributor primary on coil and ground. Bring engine around manually until light just comes on. About 1/4 of the dampener circumference from 1st setting.
Set both valves on 2nd firing cylinder, in my case #8.
3)Continue as above, adjusting valve gaps in cylinder firing order when test light comes on- both valves on each cylinder until you get through 'em all.
4) Replace Air filter ,valve covers etc.
5) Start engine and listen to clicks and clacks..
6) Take a bite out of a tree trunk and spit it at your engine.

I checked my feeler gauges with an electronic caliper, they were all a little on the light side, but not much. Timing was checked but unaffected. Maybe there were a few clicks and clacks before. Maybe I'm just more sensitized now. Any advice will be appreciated and evaluated. Thanks in advance.
cws

PackardV8
07-22-2017, 03:31 PM
There are times when wear has made indentations in the valve stem tips and rocker arm tips which are bridged by a feeler gauge. This results in greater clearance than the feeler gauge indicates.

A check of this is to use a dial indicator on a magnetic base. Place the tip of the dial indicator stem on the rocker arm in line with the valve stem. Rotate the engine to the correct TDC and manually manipulate the rocker to show actual on the dial indicator.

Also, wear on the cam lobes will make some more noisy than others. A thou or two less than spec is sometimes necessary to quiet them.

jack vines

cwsimpson
07-22-2017, 04:58 PM
Hi Jack-
Thanks for the advice. It is quite easy to bring everything in a mil or two. Not sure I really want to mess around with the dial indicator. I'll have to see if I can find one to try. Appreciate your thoughts on this.
cws

Mike Van Veghten
07-22-2017, 05:13 PM
Here are two of the ways I do it -

EO/IC rule (Exhaust Opening and Intake Closing) -
Set the intake valve lash when the exhaust valve is beginning to open. This will put the intake lifter at the base circle which is where you want it to be. Then set the exhaust valve lash when the intake valve is about halfway down on the closing side.

TDC method -
Bring each cylinder up to "top dead center" set both the intake and exhaust to the desired value.
NOTE - The damper ring should be marked every 90 degrees for this method. This is easy to do by cutting a piece of string 1/4 the diameter of the outer diameter of the damper plate, then mark the damper at the ends of the string, starting with the factory TDC position. Use a file to mark the plate for future valve adjustments.

Either of these methods work very accurately...as long as the user knows how to properly use a feeler gauge...that is a "light drag" on the gauge..!

Note - for the cleanest, easiest to complete, and a NO BURN on the hands...complete the adjustment (overnight) cold.
This is MUCH more accurate method than doing with the engine running, and much less hassle and potentially more accurate than with the engine hot and stopped.

Mike

rbisacca
07-22-2017, 05:20 PM
As recommended in my shop manual I always adjust my valves with the engine warm and running. It's messy but quicker and more accurate and only requires a wrench and the feeler gauge. Also, remember that Studebakers use solid not hydraulic lifters and a little "clicking and clacking" is normal. If there is no noise they are probably adjusted too tight. Not good!

JoeHall
07-22-2017, 05:32 PM
I adjust them cold, or warm, engine off.

If there is a false read on the feeler gauge due to wear on the rocker face (indicated by a circle worn into the face), that is easily fixed. Remove the rockers and re-radius them, on a bench grinder with smooth stone. Its not rocket science, just follow the contour and use light, gentle swipes to remove material till the circle disappears. Then smooth it a bit on a wire wheel and you are done. The 56J rockers are especially prone to wearing a circle into the face, and I consider this just routine maintenance anytime the rockers are removed. Seldom had to do it on a 259/289 though, probably because they get a lot more oil to the top end.

studegary
07-22-2017, 08:01 PM
As recommended in my shop manual I always adjust my valves with the engine warm and running. It's messy but quicker and more accurate and only requires a wrench and the feeler gauge. Also, remember that Studebakers use solid not hydraulic lifters and a little "clicking and clacking" is normal. If there is no noise they are probably adjusted too tight. Not good!

I second this. This is just about what I was about to input - running engine and they should not be silent.

Mike Van Veghten
07-22-2017, 08:53 PM
Running...
You will NEVER see any sort of racer (boat, car or airplane), professional or otherwise mechanic worth his/her proverbial salt...adjust rocker arms with the engine running..! I've been around all of these, never in my 66 years have I seen valve clearance adjusted with the engine running. They leave that to the folks that know better I guess.
Not just an opinion. It is NOT more accurate, matter of "fact" it's just the opposite.

I know for fact just how easy it is to NOT get clearances correct with an engine running. And if one does, it's pure luck. I've seen a few claim how good they are at this, and have been able to prove them wrong every time.
This topic comes up every now and again, with the same comments all around, and will still be able to show mis-adjustments in 99.99% of the try's.

You want proper mechanical cam adjustments, do it static.
You want proper hydraulic cam adjustments, do it hot and running.
Don't mix them up.

But...it's your engine, do as you wish for those that wish to perform this adjustment in this manor.

Mike

Mike

sals54
07-22-2017, 09:40 PM
This is the way I always do the valves in mine. Always cold, and always on the small side when gapping. Some will say its better to have some clatter. I prefer to have as little noise as possible. Its fast, easy and I haven't broken anything with this method in almost 50 years.

Get #1 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 1 – 3 – 4 -8​
Int.- 1- 2 – 5 - 7 ​

Get #6 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 2 – 5 – 6 – 7​
Int.- 3 – 4- 6 - 8​

JoeHall
07-22-2017, 09:54 PM
Running...
You will NEVER see any sort of racer (boat, car or airplane), professional or otherwise mechanic worth his/her proverbial salt...adjust rocker arms with the engine running..! I've been around all of these, never in my 66 years have I seen valve clearance adjusted with the engine running. They leave that to the folks that know better I guess.
Not just an opinion. It is NOT more accurate, matter of "fact" it's just the opposite.

I know for fact just how easy it is to NOT get clearances correct with an engine running. And if one does, it's pure luck. I've seen a few claim how good they are at this, and have been able to prove them wrong every time.
This topic comes up every now and again, with the same comments all around, and will still be able to show mis-adjustments in 99.99% of the try's.

You want proper mechanical cam adjustments, do it static.
You want proper hydraulic cam adjustments, do it hot and running.
Don't mix them up.

But...it's your engine, do as you wish for those that wish to perform this adjustment in this manor.

Mike

Mike

Mike,
I agree, I'd never do it again. Did it once, and its a good way to make a real mess with spilled and spewed oil. I saw somewhere, a valve cover modified with the top cut out, to allow access to the adjusters, yet cut down on the oil mess. Adjusting valves with motor running is old school technology, and may even be in the Stude Shop Manual. I recall my dad, who was a mechanic, using that method on OHV six cylinder cars when I was a kid. I see no benefit now though, over doing it with the motor shut down, and cold or warm.

Regardless of method, once adjusted, there should be a light tic. When the tic gradually goes away, about 10,000 miles down the road, the time for next adjustment is drawing near. I adjust them to around .030", and get 14,000-16,000 with hardened exhaust valve seats, and 10,000-12,000 with regular seats. Its time for adjustment when it begins to rock a bit, while idling. The exhaust valves close up and lose clearance, but the intakes close very little, if at all, between adjustments.

rbisacca
07-22-2017, 11:43 PM
Avanti Workshop Manual, (Engine page 20) - Valve Clearance. Engine Cold: "Use only for initial adjustment--must be followed by hot adjustment". Engine Hot: "With engine at slow idle...........".

doofus
07-23-2017, 06:52 AM
A narrow bladed "Mini Feeler Gauge" will gige you a better adjustment result hot or cold, running or static. Try it. Luck Doofus

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 09:16 AM
Here are two of the ways I do it -

EO/IC rule (Exhaust Opening and Intake Closing) -
Set the intake valve lash when the exhaust valve is beginning to open. This will put the intake lifter at the base circle which is where you want it to be. Then set the exhaust valve lash when the intake valve is about halfway down on the closing side.

TDC method -
Bring each cylinder up to "top dead center" set both the intake and exhaust to the desired value.
NOTE - The damper ring should be marked every 90 degrees for this method. This is easy to do by cutting a piece of string 1/4 the diameter of the outer diameter of the damper plate, then mark the damper at the ends of the string, starting with the factory TDC position. Use a file to mark the plate for future valve adjustments.

Either of these methods work very accurately...as long as the user knows how to properly use a feeler gauge...that is a "light drag" on the gauge..!

Note - for the cleanest, easiest to complete, and a NO BURN on the hands...complete the adjustment (overnight) cold.
This is MUCH more accurate method than doing with the engine running, and much less hassle and potentially more accurate than with the engine hot and stopped.

Mike

Mike-
I really like the string idea- save a lot of wear and tear and maintain accuracy. All of my measurements have been done "cold"- I've already got enough of a mess. Thanks for our thoughts.
cws

jclary
07-23-2017, 09:55 AM
I know, I am one of the least qualified forum members to comment on this topic. (But when has that ever stopped me?:rolleyes:) Especially, given the credentials/credibility of some who have already posted. Evident here, is that there is more than one way to adjust valves. In my many years of tinkering with all sorts of engines, I have found that people develop "expectations" from the bulk of their experience. Therefore, if your experience is mostly with hydraulic lifter type engines, your expectation will be a running "sound" of that type engine. Very little valve clatter.

Folks unfamiliar with solid lifter engines, especially occasional mechanics, giving only a slight glance at an instruction manual, and relying on their "expectations," will invariably try to adjust the valve train for quiet running. Somewhere here, we are missing something. It is not the technique, nor the noise...

How 'bout PERFORMANCE???:confused: Hot, cold, running, or static...get 'em adjusted.;) I have used a couple of the above mentioned techniques (with equal ineptitude of my talents.:o) Once they are opening, and closing, on time, in time...the performance trumps technique, or accompanying clatter.:cheers:

altair
07-23-2017, 12:16 PM
The valve adjustment procedure may not be the issue. I went through the same issue and still had noisy lifters. For a totally unrelated issue I removed the rocker assemblies and found several of the small oil holes supplying oil to the rockers plugged with debris and therefore there was no oil, that is what was clattering not the adjustment nor the procedure.

Buzzard
07-23-2017, 12:19 PM
A little off topic but I always thought that one of the nicest sounding engines (not a Studebaker) was the early Chevrolet 327 Solid Lifter L76 & L84 rated at 365 and 375 HP respectively also referred to as the 30 / 30 solid lifter camshaft. These early motors had a great bore to stroke ratio and ran real hard for their displacement.
JMHO
Bill

JoeHall
07-23-2017, 02:48 PM
The valve adjustment procedure may not be the issue. I went through the same issue and still had noisy lifters. For a totally unrelated issue I removed the rocker assemblies and found several of the small oil holes supplying oil to the rockers plugged with debris and therefore there was no oil, that is what was clattering not the adjustment nor the procedure.

Wow, thie definitely supports what Jack Vines has advised here several times: completely disassemble and clean the rocker assemblies, to include removing the end plugs of the shafts and cleaning them thoroughly, from the inside out.

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 04:48 PM
I adjust them cold, or warm, engine off.

If there is a false read on the feeler gauge due to wear on the rocker face (indicated by a circle worn into the face), that is easily fixed. Remove the rockers and re-radius them, on a bench grinder with smooth stone. Its not rocket science, just follow the contour and use light, gentle swipes to remove material till the circle disappears. Then smooth it a bit on a wire wheel and you are done. The 56J rockers are especially prone to wearing a circle into the face, and I consider this just routine maintenance anytime the rockers are removed. Seldom had to do it on a 259/289 though, probably because they get a lot more oil to the top end.

Joe-
Thanks for the advice. Not crazy about pulling headbolts out, but I did it just last week to replace valve seals on said vehicle. I don't think there's another way to get them off. I'll give the gapping one more shot here and see what happens.
cws

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 04:54 PM
The valve adjustment procedure may not be the issue. I went through the same issue and still had noisy lifters. For a totally unrelated issue I removed the rocker assemblies and found several of the small oil holes supplying oil to the rockers plugged with debris and therefore there was no oil, that is what was clattering not the adjustment nor the procedure.

Shoulda this read this one first. Good thought on checking that. I just wasn't crazy about taking out the head bolts again, as I just replaced the valve
seals. I know everything seemed to be working before I undertook this project.... er...I think. thanks for pointing that out.
cws

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 05:10 PM
I know, I am one of the least qualified forum members to comment on this topic. (But when has that ever stopped me?:rolleyes:) Especially, given the credentials/credibility of some who have already posted. Evident here, is that there is more than one way to adjust valves. In my many years of tinkering with all sorts of engines, I have found that people develop "expectations" from the bulk of their experience. Therefore, if your experience is mostly with hydraulic lifter type engines, your expectation will be a running "sound" of that type engine. Very little valve clatter.

Folks unfamiliar with solid lifter engines, especially occasional mechanics, giving only a slight glance at an instruction manual, and relying on their "expectations," will invariably try to adjust the valve train for quiet running. Somewhere here, we are missing something. It is not the technique, nor the noise...

How 'bout PERFORMANCE???:confused: Hot, cold, running, or static...get 'em adjusted.;) I have used a couple of the above mentioned techniques (with equal ineptitude of my talents.:o) Once they are opening, and closing, on time, in time...the performance trumps technique, or accompanying clatter.:cheers:
John-
Thanks for your thought. When I decided to do this, it was indeed performance related. A quest for better mileage, power, and responseiveness.I guess I just figured if those babies are clattering away now, probably not too efficient. Maybe they were okay before and I just didn't realize it. Figured it was worth a shot. I just don't think a clattering valve train, which is what I have now, is going to help much in the performance department. Altair also had a great point about lubrication of the rockers, as mine were sitting on the bench drying or draining out for a couple of days. Thanks for your thoughts on the subject. I'm afraid we're in violent agreement:!:. and yes, I'm running out of patience with the whole project and probably will "get 'em adjusted."

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 06:42 PM
This is the way I always do the valves in mine. Always cold, and always on the small side when gapping. Some will say its better to have some clatter. I prefer to have as little noise as possible. Its fast, easy and I haven't broken anything with this method in almost 50 years.

Get #1 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 1 – 3 – 4 -8​
Int.- 1- 2 – 5 - 7 ​

Get #6 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 2 – 5 – 6 – 7​
Int.- 3 – 4- 6 - 8​

Thanks Sal-
This looks pretty good. I'm gonna have to give it all another shot!:)
So when #1 is on the exhaust AT UDC stroke, #6 is on the compression at UDC, as it's #5 in the firing order? This might work pretty well. This looks like a little easier method in terms of moving things around. Thanks for your thoughts.
cws

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 08:02 PM
This is the way I always do the valves in mine. Always cold, and always on the small side when gapping. Some will say its better to have some clatter. I prefer to have as little noise as possible. Its fast, easy and I haven't broken anything with this method in almost 50 years.

Get #1 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 1 – 3 – 4 -8​
Int.- 1- 2 – 5 - 7 ​

Get #6 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 2 – 5 – 6 – 7​
Int.- 3 – 4- 6 - 8​

I do have another question- i know it's gonna sound dumb- how do you identify the exhaust vs. intake valves?- of course I could just pick out the loose valves and go for for it, but I think I need a little more clarity, if possible. Thanks.
cws

tbredehoft
07-23-2017, 08:54 PM
how do you identify the exhaust vs. intake valves?

The position of the valve relative to the port of the exhaust manifold should be a tip-off.

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 08:57 PM
This is the way I always do the valves in mine. Always cold, and always on the small side when gapping. Some will say its better to have some clatter. I prefer to have as little noise as possible. Its fast, easy and I haven't broken anything with this method in almost 50 years.

Get #1 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 1 – 3 – 4 -8​
Int.- 1- 2 – 5 - 7 ​

Get #6 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 2 – 5 – 6 – 7​
Int.- 3 – 4- 6 - 8​
Hey Sal-
Never mind on that last question. Seems obvious when you look at the engine. Ends and two middle valves seem to be exhaust on each side, as that's where the ports are for the exhaust manifold. Thanks again,
cws

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 10:19 PM
how do you identify the exhaust vs. intake valves?

The position of the valve relative to the port of the exhaust manifold should be a tip-off.
indeed!:)
thx
cws

cwsimpson
07-23-2017, 10:52 PM
A narrow bladed "Mini Feeler Gauge" will gige you a better adjustment result hot or cold, running or static. Try it. Luck Doofus
Thanks, Doofus- by the looks of 'em, seems like they'd be handy.
cws

GrumpyOne
07-23-2017, 11:25 PM
I'm convinced that hot and running valve clearance adjustments are the best and most long lasting. My old family mechanic back in my youth, (he looked like and had personality of Nikita Kruchev), did it that way with a simple feeler gauge and every time is was successful.

Later, I did it with the engine cold and would run through the routine three times with reasonable success and it wasn't messy.

About fifteen years ago, I had to "freshen up" a Lark 259 because it had a spun bearing. The rest of the engine was in pretty good shape as it had only 50K on it. I used my last set of JC Whitney chrome rings, the offending rod journal with a NOS crankshaft and the rod trued, new main bearings, refreshed the heads with new seals and lapped all valves/seats etc. The guy who owned the shop adjusted the valves by sound while the engine was hot and running by just leaving an ever so slight "tick" audible. Once the valves on one side were done, replace the valve cover and repeated on the other side. I drove it around locally for about a hundred miles, changed the oil, (SAE 30), and left Austin for the east coast changing the oil at 500 and 1000 mile intervals. Got stuck on the freeway in the Louisville metro area but was rescued by a local cop. (Turned out to be a failed (new) Airtex fuel pump which I left in place and bolted an electric pump next to it). Got to RI, drove around for two weeks then drove back to TX with the car loaded with Studebaker stuff without missing a beat. As an aside, i ended up cranking up the timing as gas was only 98¢ a gallon back in the late 1990's. That car would chirp even with the second gear start on the FOM! And I don't remember how many motor mounts I broke from having a heavy foot..

So my next valve adjustment will be with a hot running engine!

sals54
07-24-2017, 02:04 AM
Hey Sal-
Never mind on that last question. Seems obvious when you look at the engine. Ends and two middle valves seem to be exhaust on each side, as that's where the ports are for the exhaust manifold. Thanks again,
cws

I know how it goes. Sometimes the question comes out before looking. Don't worry about it, we all do it. With cyl number one a TDC, adjust all the valves shown on that list. Same with number 6 at TDC. Easy and fast. You get all the valves adjusted with one revolution of the engine. And oil is not pouring out all over the place.
A little tip, though. I use the wrench to tap the top of the rocker arm above the push rod when using the feeler gage. Adjust the screw, then tap it again and check the adjustment again before moving to the next one. The push rod should be seated well in the rocker when checking the gap. And even with oil on the feeler gage, it should be just a bit "sticky" in the gap.
Good luck. I'm sure you'll get through this well enough.

hausdok
07-24-2017, 03:14 AM
Running...
You will NEVER see any sort of racer (boat, car or airplane), professional or otherwise mechanic worth his/her proverbial salt...adjust rocker arms with the engine running..! I've been around all of these, never in my 66 years have I seen valve clearance adjusted with the engine running. They leave that to the folks that know better I guess.
Not just an opinion. It is NOT more accurate, matter of "fact" it's just the opposite.

I know for fact just how easy it is to NOT get clearances correct with an engine running. And if one does, it's pure luck. I've seen a few claim how good they are at this, and have been able to prove them wrong every time.
This topic comes up every now and again, with the same comments all around, and will still be able to show mis-adjustments in 99.99% of the try's.

You want proper mechanical cam adjustments, do it static.
You want proper hydraulic cam adjustments, do it hot and running.
Don't mix them up.

But...it's your engine, do as you wish for those that wish to perform this adjustment in this manor.

Mike

Mike

Forty years ago when I worked for Toyota it wasn't unusual to adjust the valves with the engine running. Toyota even provided special plastic drip trays that one snapped onto the head to capture the oil being slung and drip it into the engine. I'd adjust them cold first and then start the engine and warm it to operating temperature. Shut it down, remove the valve cover, re-torque the head, fit the tray in place, start it up and go through them again. Any that felt too tight when I passed a gauge through would be adjusted then and there with the engine running - just enough to quite the clatter, and then checked again with the feeler gauges. A vacuum gauge would tell me if a valve or two was way out of whack.

Yeah, I got oiled up pretty good, despite the oil catch trays, and I went through a lot of gauges, because doing more than five engines would thin the gauges, so I'd buy them a dozen at a time from the Mac guy. I did a lot of them during the 3TC recall days of '73 and '74 when we had to re-ring 'em, replace the valve guides and seats, re-grind the valves to a different set of angles and plug an oil circuit hole to force more oil to the rocker arms. I never had one come back for valve issues and they'd idle so quiet that if you were standing next to one with the hood down you wondered whether it was even running.

StudeRich
07-24-2017, 03:42 AM
Interesting Mike, I bought a New '73 Corona but it had a neat little 22R Overhead Cam 4 Cyl. Engine also used in the Cortina, Celica and Pickup Trucks.
Never heard of the 3TC what were those in?

christophe
07-24-2017, 11:01 AM
I never tried it but the Gunson Click-Adjust Micrometer Tappet Adjuster is supposed to overcome this kind of trouble.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81TxMG7oKgL._SL1500_.jpg
The instructions are here:http://www.gunson.co.uk//items/PDF/Products/G4094_Instructions.pdf, in case you'd like to know how it works.

cwsimpson
07-24-2017, 07:56 PM
I never tried it but the Gunson Click-Adjust Micrometer Tappet Adjuster is supposed to overcome this kind of trouble.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81TxMG7oKgL._SL1500_.jpg
The instructions are here:http://www.gunson.co.uk//items/PDF/Products/G4094_Instructions.pdf, in case you'd like to know how it works.


Wow- who knew?? Very interesting. Thanks
cws

studegary
07-24-2017, 08:40 PM
About a half a Century ago, I watched the head mechanic from a Studebaker dealership adjust valves on many Studebaker V8s. He made a rough adjustment cold and static and the final adjustment warm and dynamic/running. He had one of those cut away valve covers, but claimed that it was too much of a nuisance to use.

doofus
07-25-2017, 06:54 AM
The Gunson tool wont work on Studes,made for a lock nut and adj. screw set up,stude has adj nut under the rocker so no access to it. Luck Doofus PS I do it cold,always have with excellent results.

cwsimpson
07-25-2017, 07:11 AM
Thanks, everyone,for all your help. I have learned a heckuvalot from this and other Stude forums I have been involved in. I appreciate all the info and different opinions on what may work and what doesn't. Regardless of how we feel on certain issues, we all love our Studes and want to keep driving 'em forever!

cwsimpson
07-26-2017, 03:10 PM
After rechecking measuremnts, everything seemed okay but there was a very discerable click coming from the right hand side. Ran withou cover and noticed that 3/8 rockers weren't getting ANY oil. Exactly what Altair was talking about ! Next move is to take rocker assemblies off and clean as well as pushrods. Better do both sides... suggestions?

55 56 PREZ 4D
07-26-2017, 04:00 PM
How were the valves adjusted from the factory [cold static or warm running ?] and did the valves need to be adjusted at the dealer before delivery ?

cwsimpson
07-26-2017, 06:56 PM
How were the valves adjusted from the factory [cold static or warm running ?] and did the valves need to be adjusted at the dealer before delivery ?
I have no idea, but for some reason I want to assume warm running. I don't know if it was part of a dealer prep or not.

studegary
07-26-2017, 08:45 PM
How were the valves adjusted from the factory [cold static or warm running ?] and did the valves need to be adjusted at the dealer before delivery ?

I think that it was part of the 1000 mile service/check up in the early 1950s.

I just looked in a 1953 Commander Owner's Manual. Spring and Fall services both include torqueing head bolts and valve adjustment. This is when the average car was driven about 10,000 miles, or less, per year.

JoeHall
07-26-2017, 09:24 PM
I think too much is being made here, of a simple task. You can set them cold, warm or hot with engine stopped or running. If opting for engine stopped, there are probably half dozen ways to find a suitable spot on the cam heel to adjust each valve. You can set them on the tight side of spec, as I understand some racers do, or way loose (I set them at .030"). Any way you choose to adjust them, the end goal is the same: clearance at or near spec when running. If adjusted properly, each valve usually has a light tic, at idle.

No matter how you adjust them, you should plan on doing it again in 10,000 to 15,000 miles.

55 56 PREZ 4D
07-26-2017, 09:27 PM
Warm, running would mean adjustment done either on a test stand or somewhere near the end of the assembly line.
In either case there would have been a mess to clean. With evidence of stains on the engine and vehicle.
An oil stained new car wouldn't have been a good selling point.

Dan Timberlake
07-27-2017, 07:50 PM
My most favoritest type of feeler gages -

https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-68150-Go-No-Go-Feeler-Gauge/dp/B000HI9E7U

It was about the only way to make sense of 1996 Honda Accord 4 cyl valve adjustment, and really good for just about everything else.

Joe V
11-05-2017, 11:30 AM
This is the way I always do the valves in mine. Always cold, and always on the small side when gapping. Some will say its better to have some clatter. I prefer to have as little noise as possible. Its fast, easy and I haven't broken anything with this method in almost 50 years.

Get #1 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 1 – 3 – 4 -8​
Int.- 1- 2 – 5 - 7 ​

Get #6 to Top Dead Center
Exh.- 2 – 5 – 6 – 7​
Int.- 3 – 4- 6 - 8​

My first adjustment attempt was at operating temp with the engine running...what a mess. After a week or so the vehicle started idling very rough. After a few forum searches I determined I probably did some bad exhaust adjustments. I was getting ready to either buy a valve cover I can cut the top so I wouldn’t make such a mess or have a shop down the street do it for me. After seeing Sal’s method I thought I’d give it a try, one thing I found out halfway through is i need to manually move the rocker arm up and down a few times then move it up so I can slide the gauge in for a proper reading. I went back and redid everything just to make sure and wouldn’t you know some of the gaps were out of spec.

The vehicle fired right up, idled fine with just a little bit of valve chatter. It drove well with good power. I now feel confident enough to do this every 10k miles. Thanks Sal!