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Hallabutt
07-21-2017, 02:09 PM
Related to the thread on Bob Palma's article, I have a real question of my own. I have been blessed to own several examples of PNW survivor cars. Not the least of which is "Humphrey," the 1960, four door wagon that I was able to rescue from thirty nine years of repose in a single car garage of a ninety seven yo women who was moving to a rest home. Original shinny paint, decent interior and no rust car that people often mistake for body shop redue, which might have been done any time during it's fifty seven year life. There is much more to the story, but I will leave it there for now. I hope that it doesn't sound too pompous to say that Humphrey has developed quite a following since his coming out in 2009.

That was some of the good, now some of the bad. The other day as I was putting the car away I put a noticeable, fist sized dent in the rear quarter, below the gas filler and just in front of the wraparound of the rear bumper. I was sickened by what had happened, and the more I looked at it the more guilty I felt.

The question became an obsession as I tried to decide how to go about making the dent less noticeable, without affecting the car's original condition. I have done much of my own body work in the past, but what I would be attempting would be beyond my ability. Could the dent be gently massaged without damaging the original paint? My insurance company and the adjuster were of course all for it, and that was how they wrote it up. There was a slush fund set aside by the insurance company if deemed necessary.

I subsequently contacted a technician who was experienced in doing what I needed done. Unfortunately his response was not what I wanted to hear. He indicated that the process only worked on the newer thin, hard metal on today's modern cars, and that it would not work on the old stuff. Not sure if I want to repair with the large paint blend that would be necessary or leave it and call it patina. Anybody out there want to comment?

SScopelli
07-21-2017, 02:55 PM
My regional understanding of the word "Patina" is more to the condition of the paint, not "damage."

Like a car/truck door with faded sign of a closed business or such, where restoration would be almost sacrilegious.

How could you paint over this?
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4245/34807057082_aaac686cd4_n.jpg

If it is a reputable shop, they should be able to fix the damage, paint match, and paint as little as possible to get it back to that Survivor quality.

T.J. lavallee
07-21-2017, 02:59 PM
I don't believe there's any harm in a repair as you indicated that you're not sure it's all original anyway. Paintref.com can get you the proper paint code for a blend and fog. Take out as much of the ding as is possible and then smooth out with Bondo. If you're unsure leave it to a pro who's been around in this field for a long while. The older heavier metal requires a heavier hand with body hammer and dowel. It is less likely to warp than today's thin metal. This sounds like a relatively simple repair and shouldn't even be noticeable when done right. If this dent really bothers you fix it. You'll both be better for it.

53k
07-21-2017, 03:01 PM
Dealers around here often use a dent removal service to improve the appearance of trade-ins or repair customer cars. You might look into one like this- https://www.dentwizard.com/paintless-dent-repair.aspx

I know they have successfully repaired heavier sheet metal. I just happened to have my '92 Chrysler at the dealer one time when a dent repair service was fixing hail damage on several trade-in cars. I had a small crease on the Chrysler and he fixed it so well that the old damage could not be seen at all.

thunderations
07-21-2017, 03:09 PM
Fix it and have a person trained with an air brush to paint the patina back on.

jclary
07-21-2017, 03:18 PM
In our local BMW plant, in the finish department, there were skilled repairmen responsible for repairing small flaws, dents and dings that occurred on the line. I'm not sure if I'm spelling it right, but they were called "spanglers." They often fabricated their own tools, hammers, rods, etc., to reach into panels to manipulate the metal from behind. Somewhere, in one of my (too many) junk drawers, I have a small "nib" that looks like it was made from a piece of a file given to me by one of the spanglers. It was used for leveling surface flaws in paint, then the spot would be polished and blended. I doubt the term was unique to this auto plant, since many of their staff came from other manufacturers all over the country.

If the dent was not so severe as to stretch the metal too much, you might be able to "pull" it with a strong suction cup. But, I'm a little more forgiving regarding the term "Patina." For example, on a Tank, Bomber, or Fighter-plane, a bullet hole, or the patch to cover one...I consider "patina." Battle scars earned in hard service.

BILT4ME
07-21-2017, 04:40 PM
Many of the body guys today use kits like the following to pull hail dents and door dings. They do this by hot gluing a pin to the exterior and have a special pin-puller that pulls on it until is releases and can get it back to flush.

It may be worthwhile to try, it just may not be as effective on the heavier old sheet metal.

Can you post some pics of the issue for the body guys on here?
https://www.ebay.com/i/172151744360?chn=ps&dispItem=1&var=470988997831

hausdok
07-24-2017, 03:43 AM
I think the dent pulling guy means that those modern pulling kits are designed to break away at a tension that's insufficient to pull the old metal. Maybe the same thing could be done with a permanent type epoxy. Adhere some metal rods to the dent using epoxy, pull the dent out bit by bit, massage it a little bit with a dolly and hammer and then cut away the rods, grind the nubs and epoxy off and then have a painter finish up.

jts359
07-24-2017, 07:09 AM
A friend of mine had a plum shaped dent removed from the trunk of a Golden Hawk , He did a beautiful job with no lose of paint and the dent was there long before he got the car , I would try finding another technician as it can be done on OLD metal , ED

E. Davis
07-24-2017, 10:40 AM
It absolutely can. I have had paintless dent removal done on old and new cars to remove parking lot door dings and even light collision damage. They now use the glue and pull method a lot but I have had door dents repaired where they used a tool to push it out. You won't be able to see where they repaired it if the body tech knows what he is doing.

Bordeaux Daytona
07-24-2017, 10:56 AM
I bought one of these for my Tahoe after someone opened their rear door into it but haven't tried it yet....
https://www.dingking.tv/



another version
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/motorup-pops-a-dent-repair-kit-mpad-4/7100082-p?c3ch=PLA&c3nid=7100082-P&c3apidt=22084222996&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI24zvnqWi1QIVirbACh1h5QP7EAYYAiABEgJ_WvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

t walgamuth
07-25-2017, 11:59 AM
In our local BMW plant, in the finish department, there were skilled repairmen responsible for repairing small flaws, dents and dings that occurred on the line. I'm not sure if I'm spelling it right, but they were called "spanglers." They often fabricated their own tools, hammers, rods, etc., to reach into panels to manipulate the metal from behind. Somewhere, in one of my (too many) junk drawers, I have a small "nib" that looks like it was made from a piece of a file given to me by one of the spanglers. It was used for leveling surface flaws in paint, then the spot would be polished and blended. I doubt the term was unique to this auto plant, since many of their staff came from other manufacturers all over the country.

If the dent was not so severe as to stretch the metal too much, you might be able to "pull" it with a strong suction cup. But, I'm a little more forgiving regarding the term "Patina." For example, on a Tank, Bomber, or Fighter-plane, a bullet hole, or the patch to cover one...I consider "patina." Battle scars earned in hard service.

My Dad did this work at the Studie plant in the fifties. He called it the doll up shop. It was for anything that could be fixed in ten minutes. Anything taking longer went to a more regular body shop.