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View Full Version : Tie that car down tight....!



JRoberts
01-15-2008, 03:29 PM
You won't believe this. Guy lost his Mustang off a trailer on I-95 and didn't know it! Check out this thread:http://fordsix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=362240#362240

It may not have Studebaker content, but we all can use a reminder of safe towing rules, and common sense, now and then.


Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser
Editor of "The Down Easterner"
Eastern North Carolina Chapter

65cruiser
01-15-2008, 04:02 PM
Yeah, and I can't believe they found it weeks later--relatively unscathed. Sounds fishy to me.

[b]Mark Anderson
Member SDC and FMCA
Keeper of the Studebaker Cruiser Registry
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

My next Studebaker is in the future, but now getting my hair messed up in a Sebring ragtop!
Almost as fun as a Studebaker!

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/sebring.jpg

65cruiser
01-15-2008, 04:02 PM
Yeah, and I can't believe they found it weeks later--relatively unscathed. Sounds fishy to me.

[b]Mark Anderson
Member SDC and FMCA
Keeper of the Studebaker Cruiser Registry
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

My next Studebaker is in the future, but now getting my hair messed up in a Sebring ragtop!
Almost as fun as a Studebaker!

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/sebring.jpg

Roscomacaw
01-15-2008, 04:06 PM
I'm sorry, but that thing would have to have levitatied off the trailer for them not to have heard one HECK of a noise when it slipped off![B)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

Roscomacaw
01-15-2008, 04:06 PM
I'm sorry, but that thing would have to have levitatied off the trailer for them not to have heard one HECK of a noise when it slipped off![B)]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

bams50
01-15-2008, 04:34 PM
Hard to believe, but this is a true story:

In the late 70s a guy I raced against had left the races and stopped at a local tavern with a few other racers. He towed his car with a big old utility truck and open trailer. He obviously had too many when he left the bar. Next morning a Trooper woke him up with a knock on the door, asking him if he was missing a race car... turns out the hitch broke off the truck, and the trailer and car went off the road and into a front porch about 20 miles from his home! He wasn't embarrassed that he never realized he lost it, or that everyone picked on him about it, but that it took so long for the State Police to figure out where he was, even though his name was clearly displayed on the car![:I][B)]

You'd have to be REALLY out of it not to know you lost your car and trailer; but that probably made less LESS noise than losing a car off a trailer[:0]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

bams50
01-15-2008, 04:34 PM
Hard to believe, but this is a true story:

In the late 70s a guy I raced against had left the races and stopped at a local tavern with a few other racers. He towed his car with a big old utility truck and open trailer. He obviously had too many when he left the bar. Next morning a Trooper woke him up with a knock on the door, asking him if he was missing a race car... turns out the hitch broke off the truck, and the trailer and car went off the road and into a front porch about 20 miles from his home! He wasn't embarrassed that he never realized he lost it, or that everyone picked on him about it, but that it took so long for the State Police to figure out where he was, even though his name was clearly displayed on the car![:I][B)]

You'd have to be REALLY out of it not to know you lost your car and trailer; but that probably made less LESS noise than losing a car off a trailer[:0]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

stude53
01-15-2008, 04:36 PM
Joe, that is one wacky story.

[img=left]http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j259/stude53/studesmall2.jpg[/img=left]Bob Feaganes (stude53)
53 Starliner Hardtop
Newton Grove, NC

stude53
01-15-2008, 04:36 PM
Joe, that is one wacky story.

[img=left]http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j259/stude53/studesmall2.jpg[/img=left]Bob Feaganes (stude53)
53 Starliner Hardtop
Newton Grove, NC

BobPalma
01-16-2008, 07:43 AM
quote:Originally posted by fastfritz

When I first saw the title of this thread I thought of this:


http://automotivemachine.net/hostpics/vette_off_trailer.jpg

[xx(][xx(]

Frank Remlinger
SDC# A004602R
http://automotivemachine.net/smleftsdcaps.jpg


[:0] OMIGOSH, Frank; when did that Corvette accident occur? Man, that car is seriously damaged in many ways; couldn't have been much worse. (But I'm sure it will be repaired and may even get done in time for Barrett-Jackson!) ;):D BP

BobPalma
01-16-2008, 07:43 AM
quote:Originally posted by fastfritz

When I first saw the title of this thread I thought of this:


http://automotivemachine.net/hostpics/vette_off_trailer.jpg

[xx(][xx(]

Frank Remlinger
SDC# A004602R
http://automotivemachine.net/smleftsdcaps.jpg


[:0] OMIGOSH, Frank; when did that Corvette accident occur? Man, that car is seriously damaged in many ways; couldn't have been much worse. (But I'm sure it will be repaired and may even get done in time for Barrett-Jackson!) ;):D BP

fastfritz
01-16-2008, 08:16 AM
When I first saw the title of this thread I thought of this:


http://automotivemachine.net/hostpics/vette_off_trailer.jpg

[xx(][xx(]

Frank Remlinger
SDC# A004602R
http://automotivemachine.net/smleftsdcaps.jpg

fastfritz
01-16-2008, 08:16 AM
When I first saw the title of this thread I thought of this:


http://automotivemachine.net/hostpics/vette_off_trailer.jpg

[xx(][xx(]

Frank Remlinger
SDC# A004602R
http://automotivemachine.net/smleftsdcaps.jpg

Studedude1961
01-16-2008, 04:03 PM
Bob: If there is ever a photo to go with the word "S***" it's that one!

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

Studedude1961
01-16-2008, 04:03 PM
Bob: If there is ever a photo to go with the word "S***" it's that one!

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

52hawk
01-16-2008, 06:32 PM
Hope it had a battery hold....oops never mind![}:)]

LaSalle,Il
61Hawk

52hawk
01-16-2008, 06:32 PM
Hope it had a battery hold....oops never mind![}:)]

LaSalle,Il
61Hawk

markansas859
01-17-2008, 07:40 AM
[quote]Originally posted by JRoberts

You won't believe this. Guy lost his Mustang off a trailer on I-95 and didn't know it! Check out this thread:http://fordsix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=362240#362240

It may not have Studebaker content, but we all can use a reminder of safe towing rules, and common sense, now and then.


Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser

It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.

Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.

Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.

GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

markansas859
01-17-2008, 07:40 AM
[quote]Originally posted by JRoberts

You won't believe this. Guy lost his Mustang off a trailer on I-95 and didn't know it! Check out this thread:http://fordsix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=362240#362240

It may not have Studebaker content, but we all can use a reminder of safe towing rules, and common sense, now and then.


Joe Roberts
'61 R1 Champ
'65 Cruiser

It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.

Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.

Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.

GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

BobPalma
01-17-2008, 08:54 AM
:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxie with a damaged corner above the windshield, when the driver took the car off the transport. The driver threatened him, saying, "You'll lose your franchise if you refuse this car!"

Dad held his ground, the car went back on the transport, and he and Uncle Milt never heard any more about it. :D (Truth be known: Ford knew Ottawa IL was a "GM town" when Dad and Uncle Milt took over the poorly-performing Ford dealer there in the summer of 1964. They had done such a good job building the place back up that he thought they could afford to refuse the car, and he was apparently right.) :D BP

BobPalma
01-17-2008, 08:54 AM
:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxie with a damaged corner above the windshield, when the driver took the car off the transport. The driver threatened him, saying, "You'll lose your franchise if you refuse this car!"

Dad held his ground, the car went back on the transport, and he and Uncle Milt never heard any more about it. :D (Truth be known: Ford knew Ottawa IL was a "GM town" when Dad and Uncle Milt took over the poorly-performing Ford dealer there in the summer of 1964. They had done such a good job building the place back up that he thought they could afford to refuse the car, and he was apparently right.) :D BP

studecruiser
01-17-2008, 11:00 AM
Since we are fairly new to this and never having had the need to haul a car on a trailer until now (possibly taking the Cruiser to the International),what is the proper method of tieing down a vehicle to prevent losing it or doing damage to it?

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o104/studecruiser/StudebakerShine001_001.jpg

studecruiser
01-17-2008, 11:00 AM
Since we are fairly new to this and never having had the need to haul a car on a trailer until now (possibly taking the Cruiser to the International),what is the proper method of tieing down a vehicle to prevent losing it or doing damage to it?

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o104/studecruiser/StudebakerShine001_001.jpg

studegary
01-17-2008, 12:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxy BP [/b]


Bop P. - Knowing you and the way that you correct automotive articles, I was really surprised that you got the model incorrect.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

studegary
01-17-2008, 12:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxy BP [/b]


Bop P. - Knowing you and the way that you correct automotive articles, I was really surprised that you got the model incorrect.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

rockinhawk
01-17-2008, 01:31 PM
HERE'S some Studebaker content, Several years ago my Friend John Covell had 2 Studes a52 Champion, And a55 Commander. Both were having mechanical problems. I agreed to fix the 55 in exchange for the 52. I along with my Son-in law and grandson, made the 80 mile trip to Brunswick Ga. and loaded the 55 on my trailor. John had rented a 2 wheeled dolly and followed my home with the 52 in tow. About a mile from my shop John turned left and the 52 kept going straight. Through a parking lot,barely missing some fuel tanks and ended up nose first in a drainage ditch. The MASTER must have been watching for no one was hurt and the car was not even scratched. This was the 2nd time that car had trouble with a dolly. We vowed to never put it on one again. NT


Neil Thornton
Hazlehurst, GA
'57 Silver Hawk
'56 Sky Hawk
'51 2R16 dump truck
Many others.
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/avatar2.jpg

rockinhawk
01-17-2008, 01:31 PM
HERE'S some Studebaker content, Several years ago my Friend John Covell had 2 Studes a52 Champion, And a55 Commander. Both were having mechanical problems. I agreed to fix the 55 in exchange for the 52. I along with my Son-in law and grandson, made the 80 mile trip to Brunswick Ga. and loaded the 55 on my trailor. John had rented a 2 wheeled dolly and followed my home with the 52 in tow. About a mile from my shop John turned left and the 52 kept going straight. Through a parking lot,barely missing some fuel tanks and ended up nose first in a drainage ditch. The MASTER must have been watching for no one was hurt and the car was not even scratched. This was the 2nd time that car had trouble with a dolly. We vowed to never put it on one again. NT


Neil Thornton
Hazlehurst, GA
'57 Silver Hawk
'56 Sky Hawk
'51 2R16 dump truck
Many others.
http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/avatar2.jpg

BobPalma
01-17-2008, 01:54 PM
quote:Originally posted by studegary


quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxy BP [/b]


Bop P. - Knowing you and the way that you correct automotive articles, I was really surprised that you got the model incorrect.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer


[:0] OOPS! GALAXIE, Gary! ;) [b]BP

BobPalma
01-17-2008, 01:54 PM
quote:Originally posted by studegary


quote:Originally posted by BobPalma

:) Interesting. In 1965, my Dad (as a Ford/Mercury dealer) refused a new 1965 Galaxy BP [/b]


Bop P. - Knowing you and the way that you correct automotive articles, I was really surprised that you got the model incorrect.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer


[:0] OOPS! GALAXIE, Gary! ;) [b]BP

53k
01-17-2008, 02:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by markansas859
[It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.
Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.
Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.
GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

I can't believe even GM would do that. Several years ago a decked out Chevrolet Silverado got a dent in the cab while on the carrier. GM was going to scrap the truck since they wouldn't allow it to be repaired and sold as a new vehicle. Ultimately they donated the truck to the Auto Mechanics Class at the local vocational school with the stipulation that it could not be titled and sold.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

53k
01-17-2008, 02:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by markansas859
[It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.
Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.
Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.
GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

I can't believe even GM would do that. Several years ago a decked out Chevrolet Silverado got a dent in the cab while on the carrier. GM was going to scrap the truck since they wouldn't allow it to be repaired and sold as a new vehicle. Ultimately they donated the truck to the Auto Mechanics Class at the local vocational school with the stipulation that it could not be titled and sold.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

studegary
01-17-2008, 02:36 PM
In the 1990s, when I sold new Chrysler Corp. vehicles, vehicles with light transportation damage were repaired and then sold at Chrysler dealer only auctions. They may have had no miles, but they could not be sold by the Chrysler dealers as new vehicles. They came with the Chrysler warranty, but were sold as used cars. We almost always had a couple on the used car lot with single digit odometer readings.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

studegary
01-17-2008, 02:36 PM
In the 1990s, when I sold new Chrysler Corp. vehicles, vehicles with light transportation damage were repaired and then sold at Chrysler dealer only auctions. They may have had no miles, but they could not be sold by the Chrysler dealers as new vehicles. They came with the Chrysler warranty, but were sold as used cars. We almost always had a couple on the used car lot with single digit odometer readings.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

SDC member since 1968
Studebaker enthusiast much longer

53k
01-17-2008, 02:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by studecruiser

Since we are fairly new to this and never having had the need to haul a car on a trailer until now (possibly taking the Cruiser to the International),what is the proper method of tieing down a vehicle to prevent losing it or doing damage to it?

First, your trailer should have built-in tie down rings, at least one in front (two is better) and two in back. Be sure the trailer has attached front wheel stops (so your vehicle can't roll forward off the trailer). Then you need at least three (again, four is better) ratcheting tie-down straps rated heavy enough to lift a car (I think most are rated at either 10,000 or 20,000 pounds) plus three (or four) axle straps. Pull the car tightly against the trailer wheel stops. In the rear, place an axle strap around the rear axle just outboard the differential. Attach your tie-down strap to the axle strap and to the tie-down ring on the OPPOSITE side of the trailer. Repeat the process on the other side. In other words, the rear tie-downs should be crossed. Tighten the ratchets as tight as you can. In front I like to put an axle strap around the frame cross member that supports the transmission. I hook my third tie-down strap to that and to the front tie-down ring and pull it as tight as I can. Some people advocate two front straps too and I can't argue with that. If you do have two in front, they should be attached so they can be crossed too. Drive several miles, stop and re-tighten all the straps (yes, they will be looser than you think).
Keep in mind that your car is much more likely to move forward on the trailer than to roll backward (sudden stop or, perish the thought, a collision, exerts much more force than acceleration or going up a hill).
There are a lot of dumb things you can do with a trailer and I think I have done most of them [:I]. Be sure your trailer is firmly hitched to the tow vehicle before before driving on to the trailer (big dent and scratch in my truck tailgate). Be sure your car isn't going to move once you unstrap it (Lark convertible stuck on the trailer jack- before I bolted on the stops that came with the trailer). Always use your ramps and make sure you have them as straight with the floor of the trailer as possible (badly dented air scoop from backing off the trailer when the beavertail was only a couple inches above the ground- trailers rise as the load comes off)


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

53k
01-17-2008, 02:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by studecruiser

Since we are fairly new to this and never having had the need to haul a car on a trailer until now (possibly taking the Cruiser to the International),what is the proper method of tieing down a vehicle to prevent losing it or doing damage to it?

First, your trailer should have built-in tie down rings, at least one in front (two is better) and two in back. Be sure the trailer has attached front wheel stops (so your vehicle can't roll forward off the trailer). Then you need at least three (again, four is better) ratcheting tie-down straps rated heavy enough to lift a car (I think most are rated at either 10,000 or 20,000 pounds) plus three (or four) axle straps. Pull the car tightly against the trailer wheel stops. In the rear, place an axle strap around the rear axle just outboard the differential. Attach your tie-down strap to the axle strap and to the tie-down ring on the OPPOSITE side of the trailer. Repeat the process on the other side. In other words, the rear tie-downs should be crossed. Tighten the ratchets as tight as you can. In front I like to put an axle strap around the frame cross member that supports the transmission. I hook my third tie-down strap to that and to the front tie-down ring and pull it as tight as I can. Some people advocate two front straps too and I can't argue with that. If you do have two in front, they should be attached so they can be crossed too. Drive several miles, stop and re-tighten all the straps (yes, they will be looser than you think).
Keep in mind that your car is much more likely to move forward on the trailer than to roll backward (sudden stop or, perish the thought, a collision, exerts much more force than acceleration or going up a hill).
There are a lot of dumb things you can do with a trailer and I think I have done most of them [:I]. Be sure your trailer is firmly hitched to the tow vehicle before before driving on to the trailer (big dent and scratch in my truck tailgate). Be sure your car isn't going to move once you unstrap it (Lark convertible stuck on the trailer jack- before I bolted on the stops that came with the trailer). Always use your ramps and make sure you have them as straight with the floor of the trailer as possible (badly dented air scoop from backing off the trailer when the beavertail was only a couple inches above the ground- trailers rise as the load comes off)


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

mapman
01-17-2008, 02:50 PM
Studecruiser, there have been threads on tying down cars before but a simple rule of thumb is that all straps or chains should pull against each other, never in the same direction. Also hook to a part that doesn't move such as the axel or lower a-arm. there is a tie down eye on the lower a-arm. If the suspension is compressed such as during hard braking or turning it can allow the tie down to come loose if it is hooked to the body. After you have moved the car a ways recheck the straps, if they are loose be sure to figure out why, don't just retighten. Wheel straps are nice, if available, since there isn't a lot of hook up options with them. A lot of people who haul for a living have their hook-up preferences but they generally end up doing the same thing.
Remember a load that can move can come loose. Park it in gear and set the brake.
When you load your trailer balance is important. Too much weight on the front or back will adversely affect handling. When it is loaded right it is not even noticeable back there. Just leave a little extra space for braking.
Rob

mapman
01-17-2008, 02:50 PM
Studecruiser, there have been threads on tying down cars before but a simple rule of thumb is that all straps or chains should pull against each other, never in the same direction. Also hook to a part that doesn't move such as the axel or lower a-arm. there is a tie down eye on the lower a-arm. If the suspension is compressed such as during hard braking or turning it can allow the tie down to come loose if it is hooked to the body. After you have moved the car a ways recheck the straps, if they are loose be sure to figure out why, don't just retighten. Wheel straps are nice, if available, since there isn't a lot of hook up options with them. A lot of people who haul for a living have their hook-up preferences but they generally end up doing the same thing.
Remember a load that can move can come loose. Park it in gear and set the brake.
When you load your trailer balance is important. Too much weight on the front or back will adversely affect handling. When it is loaded right it is not even noticeable back there. Just leave a little extra space for braking.
Rob

rockne10
01-17-2008, 09:14 PM
Like Rob said, if you load it too far forward it will increase the tongue weight. This will lower the rear of your tow vehicle and lighten the front, making it steer unreliably. Load it too far back and the trailer will be driving the tow vehicle.

rockne10
01-17-2008, 09:14 PM
Like Rob said, if you load it too far forward it will increase the tongue weight. This will lower the rear of your tow vehicle and lighten the front, making it steer unreliably. Load it too far back and the trailer will be driving the tow vehicle.

Guido
01-17-2008, 09:30 PM
Another thing to consider is making sure that your tow vehicle will not move by loading on level ground. A number of years ago I was loading a small crawler loader on one of my trailers in the driveway that had a slight downhill grade. As I went up the ramps the rear end of the truck was lifted off the ground. While it was in gear and the parking brake set, the was nothing to hold it and down the driveway we went. I was able to quickly reverse direction before any damage was done.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/62/562/2/21/69/2353221690097493054hwathP_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/60/460/3/91/1/2433391010097493054nAMBKh_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/2/49/65/2603249650097493054XvpTUI_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/64/564/6/89/77/2752689770097493054skXzAT_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/5/22/8/2609522080097493054ZNRJeA_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/69/169/4/66/56/2729466560097493054oBZsXT_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
01-17-2008, 09:30 PM
Another thing to consider is making sure that your tow vehicle will not move by loading on level ground. A number of years ago I was loading a small crawler loader on one of my trailers in the driveway that had a slight downhill grade. As I went up the ramps the rear end of the truck was lifted off the ground. While it was in gear and the parking brake set, the was nothing to hold it and down the driveway we went. I was able to quickly reverse direction before any damage was done.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/62/562/2/21/69/2353221690097493054hwathP_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/60/460/3/91/1/2433391010097493054nAMBKh_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/2/49/65/2603249650097493054XvpTUI_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/64/564/6/89/77/2752689770097493054skXzAT_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/24/565/5/22/8/2609522080097493054ZNRJeA_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/69/169/4/66/56/2729466560097493054oBZsXT_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

See pictures here: http://community.webshots.com/user/GuidoSalvage

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

markansas859
01-18-2008, 02:50 AM
quote:Originally posted by 53k


quote:Originally posted by markansas859
[It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.
Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.
Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.
GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

I can't believe even GM would do that. Several years ago a decked out Chevrolet Silverado got a dent in the cab while on the carrier. GM was going to scrap the truck since they wouldn't allow it to be repaired and sold as a new vehicle. Ultimately they donated the truck to the Auto Mechanics Class at the local vocational school with the stipulation that it could not be titled and sold.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)


well, the van was a special order, top of the line 3/4 ton that was 10 weeks overdue when it arrived. Most passenger vans were built on the 1/2 ton frame, he got it heavy duty so he could take all his extended family on vacation in comfort, and use it to haul

markansas859
01-18-2008, 02:50 AM
quote:Originally posted by 53k


quote:Originally posted by markansas859
[It happened to a friend of mine in 1972. He ordered a Chevrolet Beauville (top of the trim line) 12 passenger van. It fell off the train, and into a ditch, smashed the whole left side. Dealer asked GM where it was, GM said they shipped it. Eventually, it arrived, with loads of overspray, and masking tape residue. Patched up.
Eventually, the whole story came out. GM found the van, patched it up, and shipped it on, hoping the dealership, or customer wouldn't notice.
Dealer noticed... this was the third car he sold this family THAT YEAR. 72 Impala for wife, 72 Monte Carlo for daughter, and the van for their business.
GM finally made a deal, and he took it, and used it several years.

I can't believe even GM would do that. Several years ago a decked out Chevrolet Silverado got a dent in the cab while on the carrier. GM was going to scrap the truck since they wouldn't allow it to be repaired and sold as a new vehicle. Ultimately they donated the truck to the Auto Mechanics Class at the local vocational school with the stipulation that it could not be titled and sold.


[img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine
1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)


well, the van was a special order, top of the line 3/4 ton that was 10 weeks overdue when it arrived. Most passenger vans were built on the 1/2 ton frame, he got it heavy duty so he could take all his extended family on vacation in comfort, and use it to haul

studecruiser
01-18-2008, 09:08 AM
Thanks for all the great advise - I knew I could count on the folks in this forum!

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o104/studecruiser/StudebakerShine001_001.jpg

studecruiser
01-18-2008, 09:08 AM
Thanks for all the great advise - I knew I could count on the folks in this forum!

http://i118.photobucket.com/albums/o104/studecruiser/StudebakerShine001_001.jpg

52-fan
01-19-2008, 09:51 AM
Ditto what was said about tie-downs front and back. I was at one of the SDC International meets and saw a big Stude truck come in carrying a GT Hawk that was about to drop a rear wheel off of the bed. The driver had tied the car so it could not roll forward, but it had nothing keeping it from working itself to the back.[:0] The car was fresh out of restoration and it would have been a shame if it had fallen off of that truck.:(

1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas

52-fan
01-19-2008, 09:51 AM
Ditto what was said about tie-downs front and back. I was at one of the SDC International meets and saw a big Stude truck come in carrying a GT Hawk that was about to drop a rear wheel off of the bed. The driver had tied the car so it could not roll forward, but it had nothing keeping it from working itself to the back.[:0] The car was fresh out of restoration and it would have been a shame if it had fallen off of that truck.:(

1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, 1947 M5. Searcy,Arkansas

leroy
01-19-2008, 02:33 PM
Speaking of tie downs, I just finished metal work on 57 GH, replacd floors, hog troughs, body braces, and trunk area. the doors and trunk lined up perfectly. the fellow loaded it on the trailer and when I went outside to see him off he had a tie down strap
across the top of the doors through the car and down to the trailer.
I couldn't believe it, sprung the doors down almost half an inch.
took the strap of and gave him a strap to tie doors together from inside. The doors did come back about a Quater inch, I guess the other Quarter inch will adjust out or can spring it back.

I hope it works out for him, but all that work getting it right
wasted.

leroy

leroy
01-19-2008, 02:33 PM
Speaking of tie downs, I just finished metal work on 57 GH, replacd floors, hog troughs, body braces, and trunk area. the doors and trunk lined up perfectly. the fellow loaded it on the trailer and when I went outside to see him off he had a tie down strap
across the top of the doors through the car and down to the trailer.
I couldn't believe it, sprung the doors down almost half an inch.
took the strap of and gave him a strap to tie doors together from inside. The doors did come back about a Quater inch, I guess the other Quarter inch will adjust out or can spring it back.

I hope it works out for him, but all that work getting it right
wasted.

leroy

61hawk
01-19-2008, 06:32 PM
When I went back to ND last summer I stopped off at a farm where I had bought some old Case tractor parts. After getting the tour of his collection he was telling me about a guy who bought a steel wheel (with the steel lugs still attached) tractor from him the week before. The guy shows up with a brand new aluminum Feather-Lite trailer, loads the tractor onto it denting the hell out of the deck (the guy didn't seem to care) and tied it down with two 1" ratchet straps... we're talking about a 3000 pound tractor. The guy offered to throw in some chains and a binder but the guy said the straps would hold, that he'd done it many times before.

Lee

61hawk
01-19-2008, 06:32 PM
When I went back to ND last summer I stopped off at a farm where I had bought some old Case tractor parts. After getting the tour of his collection he was telling me about a guy who bought a steel wheel (with the steel lugs still attached) tractor from him the week before. The guy shows up with a brand new aluminum Feather-Lite trailer, loads the tractor onto it denting the hell out of the deck (the guy didn't seem to care) and tied it down with two 1" ratchet straps... we're talking about a 3000 pound tractor. The guy offered to throw in some chains and a binder but the guy said the straps would hold, that he'd done it many times before.

Lee