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View Full Version : Body: Replacing Rear Pan (Rear Weather Strip Channel) with Classic Enterprise repair piece 1953 C



1953champcoupe
07-10-2017, 08:26 PM
I have spent almost as much money at Classic Enterprise than I paid for this 53 Starlight Coupe:( I thought I would start at the rear and work forward, so far I've got both the right and left trunk corners replace, as well as parts of the inner fender in the same area. I have rebuilt the inner portion of the trunk that fits against the tail panel but haven't installed those yet. I find that the Classic part fits "like a saddle on a sow". I've even thought of cutting a slice in the middle to help it fit better (well maybe it would fit better). Can anyone on this forum offer some tricks of the trade to help it fit a little better?

I thought my 38 Chevy had lots of rust but this Studebaker puts my old Chevy to shame in the rust department.

Thanks for any assistance you can give!!

swvalcon
07-10-2017, 08:39 PM
Marv doing the same thing right now on a gt hawk rear body. IT wasn't fitting very well and thought maybe it was because car was so rusty and I had done a lot of welding on it. I started on the drivers side and tacked that side in and the passenger side needs to come up some to fit in place . Had thought same thing. Cut it at the bottom so it would come up to where it needs to be and then weld the cut area back up. Will know more this week. Sound like we are working on the same thing . This car was rusted so bad I replaced the body with a shell from AZ but thought I would weld it up and use all the extra parts I have on it and build a chev powered rat rod out of it and sell it to help with the cost of the car I'am keeping. Steve.

1953champcoupe
07-10-2017, 10:21 PM
I went out tonight to try and figure out what I could do to make it fit a little better. I ended up jacking the center of the trunk floor up and that at least allowed me to "sorta" put it in the right place. I guess it is possible that over the years with all of the rust present that it could have just slowly settled in the center. The trunk lid is virtually worthless to use as a guide since the area where the hinge mounts were are LONG gone and all I can do is set the trunk lid in place and guess where everything should line up.

swvalcon, thanks for your response, sounds like we will have similar stories to tell before we get done. This car came from Minnesota and I knew it had a little rust but............my deeply tinted rose glasses didn't give me a true picture. I wanted/needed a project so I had something to work on, I think I may have a life time project here:)

bezhawk
07-11-2017, 07:57 AM
It looks like you have the ends of your side deck lid opening panels cut off. The top of the rear panel should line up with the bottom of the side panels. get them repaired to the correct length, then maybe your rear panel will fit better.

Captain Billy
07-11-2017, 09:20 AM
Like everything....you have to make it fit

65508

Jeff_H
07-11-2017, 09:43 AM
Leroy Carey makes that entire rear panel, both the inside and outside as well as the corner mount braces. The rear panel on my '53 was so swiss cheese'd it was not fixable so I cut it completely out and replaced it.

1953champcoupe
07-11-2017, 09:54 AM
It looks like you have the ends of your side deck lid opening panels cut off. The top of the rear panel should line up with the bottom of the side panels. get them repaired to the correct length, then maybe your rear panel will fit better.
The repair piece hasn't been welded in yet, when I first tried to fit the piece up it made sense to leave it out so the tail piece would slide into place. I had tacked it in then took it out, later I used a jack on the center of the trunk and that made things fit a lot better, maybe I am closer than I think:)

1953champcoupe
07-11-2017, 09:57 AM
I guess my question should have been "over time does the trunk floor sag because of the rust in the tail pan"?? Was it hot tar pumped into the corners of the trunk? Same stuff in the quarters?

rockne10
07-11-2017, 08:09 PM
Was it hot tar pumped into the corners of the trunk? Same stuff in the quarters?I wouldn't exactly call it "hot tar", but it was obviously a petro product that filled gaps and was intended to seal. I think it primarily served as a moisture catcher. I did not replace it anywhere I found it.

swvalcon
07-11-2017, 09:48 PM
Marv I had to take my cut off wheel and make a slit in the lower couple inches right in the center to get a better fit on my panel today. The rear panel along with the way it's formed also has a curve to it right in the center. This is why I bought a classic ent. panel rather than build my own. I thought it would be a stamped part but they are building it with a brake and it's hard to get a curve using a brake. I don't think its all the panels fault that it fits so bad. I'am sure part of it is all the rust area that had to be rebuilt on this car and the fact that it bounced around for years with no support in the rear. Luckily where I had to cut the slit will be behind the bumper and when welded up you will never see it. The slit started out the width of a cut off disc and ended up about a 1/2" wide when the opposite end was in place. This is not going to be a show car by any stretch of the word. More a rat rod so as long as it holds the rear of the car together and doesn't look to awful had it will work. I do think Classic needs to look at doing this part with a press and molds instead of a brake that would help a bunch. Then you would have one part that you know is right and every thing else could be fit to that. I'll post some pictures when it's all welded in.

Milaca
07-11-2017, 11:25 PM
Marv I had to take my cut off wheel and make a slit in the lower couple inches right in the center to get a better fit on my panel today. The rear panel along with the way it's formed also has a curve to it right in the center. This is why I bought a classic ent. panel rather than build my own. I thought it would be a stamped part but they are building it with a brake and it's hard to get a curve using a brake. I don't think its all the panels fault that it fits so bad. I'am sure part of it is all the rust area that had to be rebuilt on this car and the fact that it bounced around for years with no support in the rear. Luckily where I had to cut the slit will be behind the bumper and when welded up you will never see it. The slit started out the width of a cut off disc and ended up about a 1/2" wide when the opposite end was in place. This is not going to be a show car by any stretch of the word. More a rat rod so as long as it holds the rear of the car together and doesn't look to awful had it will work. I do think Classic needs to look at doing this part with a press and molds instead of a brake that would help a bunch. Then you would have one part that you know is right and every thing else could be fit to that. I'll post some pictures when it's all welded in.

Steve, how long ago did you purchase this piece? I only ask because I was just on the Classic Enterprises website and it states that it is now vastly improved due to it being completely die-formed (their photo shows it as being curved width-wise) and costs $85.

swvalcon
07-12-2017, 08:46 AM
Brent I got it about two weeks ago. If fact I picked it up when I went through that part of WI. one day. It's close to the right shape and saved a lot of work building my own but they still need a little bit more curve to the panel to have it fit right. As I said that is hard to do bending it in a brake which is why I choose not to build it myself. It will fit good enough when I'am done with it and will do what I wanted it to do on your old hawk body. Yes if I have my way it will be back on the road as a chevy powered rat rod. Mainly because I need a bunch of parts yet for the 64. Weatherstrip kit is almost $1000 by itself. Plus I've got all these extra parts laying around off the parts car and the old body and it was haul it all to scrap or do something with them and this is what my sick mind came up with. Marv Here are the pictures of the slit I had to make in the panel in order for it to pull up and around on the other side. Once it's welded in and with a little hammer dolly work it will be alright. The slit started out the thickness of a cut off wheel in a die grinder so you can see how far it had to move. Steve

swvalcon
07-13-2017, 08:26 PM
Marv I got my panel welded in today and primed so it is do able. All that's left on this piece is a small amount of seam sealer and a coat of rubberized undercoat below where the bumper filler goes.

rockne10
07-13-2017, 08:34 PM
... and a coat of rubberized undercoat below where the bumper filler goes.Unless you're planning on winter driving on salty roads, why not use the Amsiol Heavy Duty Metal Protector (MPHD) instead? It goes on wet, seeps in to seams, never dries hard, never evaporates and is virtually transparent.

http://www.amsoil.com/shopres/products/900px/AMH.jpg

wdills
07-14-2017, 08:43 AM
As stated above, Leroy Carey makes these pieces that fit properly with very little massaging. I installed one of his tail panels in my car and all I had to do was adjust the angle of some of the flanges and trim to fit. Same with his floor boards.

I am currently trying to install a trunk floor from Classic in Dads 50 Champion. It is better than starting from a piece of flat metal but noting about it is shaped correctly. I sure wish Leroy made pieces for a 50.

1953champcoupe
07-14-2017, 09:44 AM
My biggest concern is getting the panel in and having good trunk alignment, guess it's going to be trial fit, trial fit, trial fit:) I will look into the MP HD product, sounds way better than heating "tar" up to flow into a hole:)

swvalcon
07-14-2017, 02:56 PM
I think that metal protector is similar to 3-m rust fighter I. It's made to be sprayed in the inside of doors and 1/4 panels.