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View Full Version : Cleaners, polishers, waxes, etc.



dleroux
07-06-2017, 09:08 PM
I have no $$ attachment to Adam's Polishes http://adamspolishes.com but I have to admit they have made my life way too easy in maintaining a quality look to my vehicles. Everyone of their products is easy to apply, works better than advertised, and it's easy. I did a complete detail on the Mrs.'s Highlander on the 4th & it took me less than an hour. You're talking to someone who used to think that the Blue Coral two-step wax product was the only way to go because that's what my father taught me. I know we all have our favorites & I've used them all from Turtle wax, McGuire's, Griotts, but I have become an Adam's adherent. I'm interested in what others have to say about what their Go-To brand / product happens to be & also what they would avoid.

riversidevw
07-06-2017, 09:31 PM
Yup, I started out with that old Blue Coral Treatment... the liquid in the blue bottle followed by the waxy resin paste. Think the very last of it went away around 1970 or shortly after. Remember the Meguiar Competition Finish liquid that came out around that time? Some of the Chemical Guys detailing products have worked out reasonably well. I'm thinking now of their "White Light Hybrid Radiant Finish" on white or very light colors. Works with a variety of paints, even the old alkyd enamels. But some of their fancy paste waxes seem ridiculously priced.

Silverplate
07-06-2017, 09:32 PM
I have been a Zaino user on my personal cars for more than fifteen years and love the stuff for ease of use and results. For the collection of cars I maintain numbering around twenty I use Adams Brilliant Glaze. Very nice product, also easy on and off and nice results. Use what works best for you.

alaipairod
07-06-2017, 10:46 PM
I have been a Zaino user on my personal cars for more than fifteen years and love the stuff for ease of use and results. For the collection of cars I maintain numbering around twenty I use Adams Brilliant Glaze. Very nice product, also easy on and off and nice results. Use what works best for you.

For what it is worth, out all the products out there, this company offers the best stuff to "condition" your high dollar paint job.......

Shine Supply - Your #1 Source for Quality Detailing Supplies (https://shinesupply.com/)

T.J. lavallee
07-07-2017, 04:19 PM
PTFT is the main ingredient in a quality car wax. It resists corrosive acid. It holds up below 200 c as well as above 200 c. It does not dissolve in solvents. It is very stable and nonflammable. It resist static and allows dirt and debris to fall off. It's clean, unoily and dry. It's very slippery. It can be packaged in fancy cans with exotic names, put in in a liquid form or in a spray bottle or spray can. Most quality car waxes in any form contain about 12% PTFT. That's what makes them easy to use leaving a very smooth brilliant shine. PTFT will hold up for up to five years. Which brand name do you prefer?

Gunslinger
07-07-2017, 04:33 PM
I like Griot's Garage products though not exclusively. I have a tub of Pinnacle Souveran wax I use on my '02 Avanti as the wax is designed to work best on darker colors like black or red. The '02 is Corvette Torch Red and the wax looks spectacular on it...a deep, wet, shimmering look. On my '70 Avanti I use Griot's Premium Carnauba Wax. On my daily drivers I use Griot's sealants.

RDWEAVER
07-07-2017, 08:31 PM
For what it is worth I found a product called Glare. I like it and if you follow their instructions..... it is amazing. There are more expensive products but they did not work as well on my paint. My Stude is painted with PPG base and PPG Deltron clear. I also use this once a year on my drivers and my Harley. I keep trying other products but this works the best for me.

plee4139
07-08-2017, 05:40 AM
I use Mothers of Maguire's because I either bought them at one time or got free samples. They are both in spray bottles so are easily applied and removed. I'm not too fussy, and can't get all heated up about this brand or that. I can remember using Simoniz paste wax on some jet-styled barge as a teen, and I'd never want to do that again.

alaipairod
07-08-2017, 11:12 AM
I use Mothers of Maguire's because I either bought them at one time or got free samples. They are both in spray bottles so are easily applied and removed. I'm not too fussy, and can't get all heated up about this brand or that. I can remember using Simoniz paste wax on some jet-styled barge as a teen, and I'd never want to do that again.
YUP, Tide laundry soap and hot water, finished off with a good coat of my Moms Johnson's paste wax worked for me on my first car...........

Bob Bryant
07-08-2017, 12:53 PM
A friend had several vehicles related to his funeral home. I asked him how he kept them so shiny. I don't recall his polish or wax, but he said not to use and soaps or detergents which remove the polish /wax...just water, a clean mitten, rinse, and towel off.

riversidevw
07-08-2017, 01:06 PM
For what it is worth I found a product called Glare. I like it and if you follow their instructions..... it is amazing. There are more expensive products but they did not work as well on my paint. My Stude is painted with PPG base and PPG Deltron clear. I also use this once a year on my drivers and my Harley. I keep trying other products but this works the best for me.

Yes, Glare is a very good liquid product. Sometimes marketed though motorcycle dealers as Honda or Yamaha Glare Professional Polish. http://www.parkeryamaha.com/hondaproglareprofessionalpolish12oz.aspx

Gil

raprice
07-08-2017, 03:15 PM
I remember, when I was a kid, I'd use either Simoniz wax or Blue Coral on my dad's car. By the time i was finished, I thought my arm would fall off.
I now use NuFinish on my cars and it goes on and off easily and stands up well against the weather.
On my Stude, I've been using Mother's Carnauba cleaner/wax and it looks great.
Rog

Gunslinger
07-08-2017, 07:46 PM
Back in the '70s I purchased a for then expensive brand of wax called Excalibur. It sold for $5.00 which was quite expensive. I used it on my '63 Avanti I had at the time. It was real hard paste wax and took hours to apply. The car really looked magnificent after. As nice as the car looked, the wax was gone in only a few weeks. It was simply not worth the effort.

There are beauty waxes and protective waxes and sealants which are synthetic waxes. Sealants generally last longer and are more reflective but tend to have a plastic appearance. True waxes don't last as long and give the deep, wet look many like.

Corvanti
07-09-2017, 10:12 AM
i've been on a CASO low budget the last few years. in the spring i will wash the '51, then clay bar, use either Nu Finish polish or Meguiars Cleaner Wax - top it off with a light coat of Meguiars Carnauba Wax. it gives her a good deep shine. wash, rinse and repeat the carnauba wax about every 2 months.

read the info on "Glare" in an above post. i may give that a try.

riversidevw
07-09-2017, 07:28 PM
This is my third post on this... my shelves are groaning under products acquired over the past decades. Sometimes certain paints seem to "like" a specific product. The Pimlico Gray on the Speedster is partial to contents of a 20 year old bottle of a Brit product, Autoglym Resin Polish. ("By Appointment to Her Majesty..."). Paint is apparently a 70's single stage acrylic enamel. But I use something different for the Congo Ivory. Beyond reason, I admit! But not always a single perfect answer for every finish.

I started with Blue Coral Treatment (the old school stuff, not the later junk with same brand), had a brief fling with an early cleaner-wax, Johnson's J-Wax. All back in '57, experimenting on the family car.

Should change my signature to 57 Varieties (of polish and wax).;)

Gil

Gunslinger
07-09-2017, 07:57 PM
You should say "My name is Gil and I'm a wax addict."

riversidevw
07-09-2017, 08:32 PM
You should say "My name is Gil and I'm a wax addict."

My name is Gil and I'm a wax addict.

Studebaker Wheel
07-09-2017, 10:26 PM
What's wrong with you guys?? I use only Studebaker brand cleaners and waxes. Anything else voids the warranty and will cost you in judging.

65472

studegary
07-09-2017, 10:50 PM
What's wrong with you guys?? I use only Studebaker brand cleaners and waxes. Anything else voids the warranty and will cost you in judging.

65472

That reminds me of one year when I drove my 1953 Commander Starliner to South Bend. I got behind a truck that was leaking diesel. The car looked like it had a flame job. I went into Standard Surplus/N & A and bought several cans of Studebaker road oil/tar remover. I washed the car with it. It removed the diesel.

For my everyday cars, I only wash them with soap and water once per year, after the road salt is gone. Other than that, I use DWG (Dri Wash N Guard) and a Kozak cloth (as well as keeping them indoors).

alaipairod
07-09-2017, 11:34 PM
A friend had several vehicles related to his funeral home. I asked him how he kept them so shiny. I don't recall his polish or wax, but he said not to use and soaps or detergents which remove the polish /wax...just water, a clean mitten, rinse, and towel off.
My Mom told me to use Tide laundry soap to cut all of the crap that was put on my car........However I had issues with the Johnson's paste wax. for floors, the Tide wash would not cut that wax..............:ohmy:

riversidevw
07-10-2017, 11:23 AM
What's wrong with you guys?? I use only Studebaker brand cleaners and waxes. Anything else voids the warranty and will cost you in judging.

65472

OK, Richard. Here you are. An unopened bottle of Lustur-Seal No. 2. Unused because No. 2 "is for use on extremely dull finishes." That's a situation I'm most unlikely to encounter in my garage. Now if I could find a fresh bottle of No. 1...

riversidevw
07-10-2017, 11:29 AM
My Mom told me to use Tide laundry soap to cut all of the crap that was put on my car........However I had issues with the Johnson's paste wax. for floors, the Tide wash would not cut that wax..............

The Tide with hot water only curdled the paint and left the floor wax, right? My wife decades ago added Chlorox bleach to her soap (probably laundry or dishwashing) to hygienically wash her late model VW. After all, she was a nurse. Results? Not a pretty sight. Then I married her 48 years ago and firmly put a stop to that. I very rarely use any soaps on my cars.

(EDIT) Washing a car with hot water or in direct sun is punishable as a felony in most advanced civilizations.;)

raprice
07-10-2017, 12:05 PM
Richard, you're absolutely right!l WHAT WAS I THINKING?
Rog

riversidevw
07-10-2017, 04:58 PM
Still admiring my red bottle of Lustur-Seal No. 2.

With my sixty year history of obsessing over polishes, waxes and sealants, I'm surprised that I never actually tried that Studebaker-Packard Lustur-Seal and Haze Cream. Just did a quick Google search. There was a Lustur-Seal Corporation in Michigan. Lustur-Seal products were also marketed with the labels of Kaiser-Frazier (in glass bottles) and Hudson-Rambler, even Shell Oil. Sort of like Blue Coral Treatment in the fifties, but Blue Coral had a slightly different clientele (Cadillac and Lincoln labeling).

Service bulletins from the fifties suggest the stuff was the greatest thing since discovery of distillation and fermentation. Anybody out there actually try it?

I'm reminded of other finish "treatments" marketed by dealers. Recall the Porcelainized window stickers on the glass of usually dull old cars? Not unlike the pitch for miracle sealants at just about every purchase of a new car these days.

Gil

studegary
07-10-2017, 10:19 PM
Still admiring my red bottle of Lustur-Seal No. 2.

With my sixty year history of obsessing over polishes, waxes and sealants, I'm surprised that I never actually tried that Studebaker-Packard Lustur-Seal and Haze Cream. Just did a quick Google search. There was a Lustur-Seal Corporation in Michigan. Lustur-Seal products were also marketed with the labels of Kaiser-Frazier (in glass bottles) and Hudson-Rambler, even Shell Oil. Sort of like Blue Coral Treatment in the fifties, but Blue Coral had a slightly different clientele (Cadillac and Lincoln labeling).

Service bulletins from the fifties suggest the stuff was the greatest thing since discovery of distillation and fermentation. Anybody out there actually try it?

I'm reminded of other finish "treatments" marketed by dealers. Recall the Porcelainized window stickers on the glass of usually dull old cars? Not unlike the pitch for miracle sealants at just about every purchase of a new car these days.

Gil

I remember commenting on the good apparance of used cars at a local Studebaker dealer that I used to frequent and where I purchased cars. The response was that they used Studebaker Lustur-Seal on them.

bensherb
07-12-2017, 03:01 AM
Washing a car with hot water or in direct sun is punishable as a felony in most advanced civilizations.;)

It sure would be nice to find both water and no direct sunlight in the same place, not gonna happen around here. Except maybe the first week of February....

I used an aircraft wax called "slipstream" for decades but can't get it anymore. Tried Mothers carnuba, not too bad, then a friend gave me a bottle of Griots "best of show" and it put's that mothers to shame; I couldn't believe the difference. Almost as good as slipstream but way easier to use. And this has always been on old alkyd enamels, not those fancy acrylics or urethanes. :D

Gunslinger
07-12-2017, 07:33 AM
If you really want to make the Griot's Best of Show Wax to really work fine, apply it, allow it to dry for a couple of hours, then apply again and buff off. The finish will look a foot deep.

parts
07-13-2017, 01:32 AM
I use Zymol on cars and bikes..

Been years..just detailer after and in between waxes,,

bensherb
07-13-2017, 04:07 AM
So I just gave my '99 Honda its hexannual washing, and with all this talk of waxes I decieded to actually wax it for the first time too. This car has been sitting oudside in the weather since 2006 and surprisingly it still has paint on it. It looked pretty good just being clean but I dug out the various waxes I have around and gave them a shot. First I put the car in the shop a few hours before starting so it could cool down, it's been between 104F and 111F for the last week, but today it was a cool 96F.

I had a can of the liquid version of "Rain Dance", tried it on the hood. It went on easy, but was very difficult to buff off...and the finish didn't look any different afterward. Scratch that one!

Next I tried "Mothers California Gold", Carnuba paste wax. It looked decent but still wasn't as shiney as I exoected it to be. It was easy to apply and pretty easy to buff off though.

I tried a couple different spray wax as you dry/dust products I had too. No big surprise, not much going on with them, easy to use and cleaned the dust but no real change in shine.

I'm trying these waxes on different panels before doing the whole car. So third and last , I tried the Griots "Best of Show" I've used it on my
Stude and bikes and have been happy with the results. It's very easy to use and easy to buff off the paint, a bit harder to buff off chrome and glass. I just put 3 to 4 dabs of it on an application pad (like useing calamine lotion, just cap the bottle with the pad and tip it. This is enough for one panel, door /fender, etc. Big difference, the car looks like new. This stuff is comparitively expensive at $21 a pint but you use very little and the results are surprising. I'll be buying it from now on.


Here the door has "Best of Show", The fender is "California Gold"
65551
WHY DOES THIS SITE ALWAYS TURN MY PHONE PICS UPSIDE DOWN? It doesn't do it with camera pics.

Here the whole car has had a once over of "Best of Show". It doesn't look like an 18 year old car with a half million miles that's been sitting outside for 11 years any more. I'd do the '01 Tundra now but there's not much to wax, the paint has been cooked off of it.
65552

Gunslinger
07-13-2017, 07:28 AM
There are beauty waxes and there are protective waxes. Beauty waxes do just that...make the car look spectacular, but often don't have longevity. Protective waxes last longer but often don't give the best look. Some can do both. You have to try several and determine what gives you the results you like.

Griot's Best of Show Wax is one that does both. There are also others. The most long lasting and protective are sealants...synthetic waxes. As I said previously, sealants generally go on easy and last a long time but tend to give a very reflective but plastic looking appearance. True carnauba waxes don't normally last as long as a sealant but give that wet looking, foot deep finish many like. It comes down to what you're looking for.

For my Avantis, I use waxes...for my daily drivers that see all the weather, I use sealants. You can put down a sealant first than stack a wax over it once it cures...but you can't put a sealant over a wax. A sealant bonds with the paint. A wax is a sacrificial barrier that sits n top of the paint. If you apply a wax first, the sealant cannot bond with the paint surface. A wax can sit on top of a sealant.