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StarDiero75
07-02-2017, 03:46 AM
Hi, so I have a 61 Lark with the OHV 6. It's kind of a barn find but does run but the fuel pump is toast. I've been looking at replacements and they're as much as the rebuild kit if not more. I'd rebuild it but I don't know how to separate the lever from the bottom of the pump and how to separate the 2 middle pieces with the valves.
I'm thinking of putting in an electric fuel pump as a cheap way to try to get it at least running. Any recommendations of what electric pump to use and what yo do?
Thanks everybody!

Jeffry Cassel
07-02-2017, 08:35 AM
Rebuilding should not be that spendy. Terrill Machine in DeLeon TX does a nice job. Kits are scarce. I usually lie to put the electric pump back near the tank and leave a mechnical pump in place so they back up each other. Do not by a cheap after market replacement; it won't work. You may want to call Phil Harris in Fairborn, Ohio. He can probably fix you up with all you need. And he is a great guy to!

tsenecal
07-02-2017, 10:32 AM
The rebuild kit that I got from " Now and Then" had good instructions, and ethanol proof parts. It was fairly easy, except for flexing the diaphragm enough to start the screws. I believe the instructions tell you how to unhook the arm inside. Some have a slot in the arm that slips over the pin, and some have a hook on the arm that slips into a slot in the arm. Good luck!

StarDiero75
07-02-2017, 02:11 PM
How do I get a hold of Phil?

64V-K7
07-02-2017, 03:56 PM
How do I get a hold of Phil?

He on here somewhere...
http://www.studebaker-info.org/rjvs.html

doofus
07-03-2017, 07:03 AM
Your pump comes apart from inside.take filter bowl off and remove large screw. IIRC 2 screws hold valve body in place. once pump halves are seperated and pivot pin removed,push down on diaphram to release lever. different brands have some differences but basicly the same. Luck Doofus

JoeHall
07-03-2017, 10:48 AM
If the OP plans to drive your his Stude a lot, year round, an electric pump is an upgrade. I have been running electric pumps on Studes for decades, no problems whatsoever, and I would never go back to mechanical pumps. An electric pump aids is hot restarts, and when the car has not been started for a week or more, by priming the system before you hit the starter. With a mechanical pump, no gas is pumped until the starter is cranking the motor over. But if the OP is more concerned with being, "correct" than with function, a mechanical pump may be best.

I prefer the cube type pump, but SI also offers a good electric pump for a reasonable price too. A mechanical pump, even when working optimal, its still a mechanical pump.

tim333
07-03-2017, 04:18 PM
If my 57 259 sits for 4-6 weeks, it cranks 10 seconds after I set the choke with one pump of the pedal. I actually used a stopwatch. My stock 36 Ford started just as well. The need for electric pumps is a myth.

JoeHall
07-03-2017, 04:36 PM
If my 57 259 sits for 4-6 weeks, it cranks 10 seconds after I set the choke with one pump of the pedal. I actually used a stopwatch. My stock 36 Ford started just as well. The need for electric pumps is a myth.

You and I have very different experiences with our Studes. Your myth is my reality, and visa versa.

Corvanti
07-03-2017, 05:07 PM
You and I have very different experiences with our Studes. Your myth is my reality, and visa versa.

Ditto!!!!!

wittsend
07-03-2017, 05:53 PM
You and I have very different experiences with our Studes. Your myth is my reality, and visa versa.

Double Ditto.

As to the original question some things to look for:

1. Certain electric pumps can be NOISY! I was given a Holley "Blue" pump and you would think there is a dentist drilling in the back seat. And this after I made a minor attempt to isolate the pump from its mounting point.

2. I was originally using the E-pump in conjunction with the mechanical pump - which I had a regulator installed after. In not too short a period of time the diaphragm in the mechanical pump failed. Now I wished I had moved the regulator before, not after the mechanical pump. But since the regulator went in a number of years before the E-pump I didn't focus on its place in the chain, only that it was there. Part of the problem with the Holley is it is designed for levels up to drag raced, dual quad, big block engines. But it was free so ... .

3. The "Faucet" style pumps (looks like a transformer with an inlet/outlet) seems to be rather quiet. I use one on my Studebaker to prime it and afterwards there is no "flow thru" problem when I turn it off. Whatever you do, put a switch on it, use a relay and a FUSE. Also if you frequent wrecking yards pick up a Ford shut off switch that shuts the pump off in case of a roll-over.

tsenecal
07-03-2017, 06:13 PM
I looked up a few electric pumps at Summit. The feedback on the Holley Blue was, as stated , very loud. Carter makes quite a few, with good reviews, in 50 to 80 dollar range. If serious about buying one, you should go to their sight and read up on the different models and customer reviews.

Mike Van Veghten
07-03-2017, 08:41 PM
tim333 wrote -
""If my 57 259 sits for 4-6 weeks, it cranks 10 seconds after I set the choke with one pump of the pedal. I actually used a stopwatch. My stock 36 Ford started just as well. The need for electric pumps is a myth.""

10 seconds is a long time to spin a crankshaft with no oil pressure..!
And unless you use pure gasoline (no alcohol) I'd bet it takes longer thAn that..!
An electric pump should provide fuel to start the (well tuned) engine within 2 to 3 seconds..!

Plus, using an electric pump pretty much eliminates the possibility of vapor-lock on those hot days.

So yea, the proper use of an electric fuel pump...IS NO myth..!

Mike

bensherb
07-04-2017, 04:00 AM
If my 57 259 sits for 4-6 weeks, it cranks 10 seconds after I set the choke with one pump of the pedal. I actually used a stopwatch. My stock 36 Ford started just as well. The need for electric pumps is a myth.

You apearently get better gas than we get here. My experiance is the same as the others, and in all my carbureted cars.

I use a Toyota inline pump mounted on the frame back near the tank (in front of spring mount) as a prime/aux pump with the stock mechanical pump still in place. The Toyota pump costs $10-$15 and is so quiet, I prime with the door open just to tell the pump is running. I power it through a on-off-momentary toggle switch mounted under the dash and use momentary for priming so I don't forget to turn it off. The "on" side of the switch is just in case the mechanical pump fails.

tim333
07-04-2017, 10:44 AM
The only one of my antiques that gave me starting problems over the last 40 years,
after a long sit, was a 76 Cutlass 350 4bbl. I never did my usual drill of rebuilding the carb on that one tho.

riversidevw
07-04-2017, 07:34 PM
Mechanical pump in my 56J still functions quite well, even if I mistreat it by a few months at a time of staying idle. But electric pumps do facilitate starting. And current brews of gas (at least here in CA) seem to vapor lock easily. Speedster has an electric pump. I got over the bit of noise long ago. No different than my brother's old Austin-Healey back in 1960.

When a fuel pump issue arose recently with the Packard Hawk, I was informed by Dave Thiebault that an electric pump would be a poor choice for that supercharged application. Fuel pressure adequate to deliver adequate gas when the carb is pressurized would tend to flood the Stromberg at other times. But my other Studes will be gradually making the change to electric, as needed.

Jet Doc
07-05-2017, 01:26 PM
Airtex makes a 6V electric fuel pump E8902, it puts out 2.5-4.5 psi. Not more than a mechanical fuel pump.
E8016S is the 12V pump.
The 6V will work with Positive ground.