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View Full Version : Who designed the 1966 Studebaker front end...



junior
07-01-2017, 02:24 PM
...as in the new revised grill and single headlight arrangement? Was it Brookes Stevens himself, or is he generally given credit just like Loewy was given credit for the new 1953's only because he was the 'head' of the design team? Was it someone other than Stevens? According to Wikipedia (yes, I know the world's foremost authority on everything) ...

"The redesign, which was evidently begun by Brooks Stevens, was completed by the Dearborn design firm of Marcks Hazelquist Powers."

So who actually designed the 66 grills? Does anyone actually know? cheers, junior

wittsend
07-01-2017, 03:52 PM
Not to take anything away from Junior's question but just pondering the "who" makes me wonder "why?" Isn't any redesign/update to the '66 Studebaker's sort of like painting a house that is ready to be demolished? Makes you wonder why they even bothered?

StudeRich
07-01-2017, 05:34 PM
I thought a lot of '66 changes were farmed out to a Canadian? Design Co.

sals54
07-01-2017, 05:35 PM
Not to take anything away from Junior's question but just pondering the "who" makes me wonder "why?" Isn't any redesign/update to the '66 Studebaker's sort of like painting a house that is ready to be demolished? Makes you wonder why they even bothered?

Dang Witts.... that's pretty rough, don't ya think?
But I couldn't agree more.
Sorry folks, just an opinion.

Mark L
07-01-2017, 07:01 PM
Stu Chapman, do you know the answer?

doug
07-01-2017, 08:48 PM
According to the Fred Fox article on 1966 Studebakers the styling was started by Brooks Stevens and handed over to Marcks, Hazelquist and Powers, a Dearborn, Michigan design firm.

8E45E
07-01-2017, 08:54 PM
Yes, it was Bob Marcks of Marcks. Hazelquist & Powers.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?9159-What-the-67-Studebaker-may-have-looked-like&highlight=marcks

Craig

BobPalma
07-01-2017, 09:39 PM
:D Brooks Stevens was the keynote speaker at the 1973 SDC National Meet Banquet in Colorado Springs; "I was there."

He discussed styling the 1966s on a shoe string. The one thing I remember was his revealing how they designed the front end to incorporate four of the brushed-aluminum rectangles because they had so little money. By using four little rectangles per car, the cost per unit went down, as opposed to having "make do" with a larger unit at a higher cost with only one per car.

I don't know if anyone recorded that speech. If they did, Brooks said how much money they were given to freshen up the cars for 1966. It was such a pittance it was a joke, but I don't remember the figure he cited and don't want to misquote him. :o :cool: BP

8E45E
07-01-2017, 10:01 PM
Interesting, Bob.

Makes one wonder just how much input Brooks Stevens & Associates vs. Marck, Hazelquist & Powers had with the 1966 models. (Proof Brooks Stevens did work on them here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?57151-Wagonaire-Woody-prototype/page2 )

In 2010, Bob Marcks in Glendale stated it was himself that convinced Studebaker management the policy of 'no changes for the sake of change' was NOT the way to go, and what worked for Volkswagen wasn't going to work for Studebaker, thus the small design changes on the 1966 models. He made no mention of the front and rear, but did mention on moving the interior trim to be more upmarket that earlier models.

Some of his post-'67 proposals here: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?41388-Bob-Marcks-At-Glendale

Craig

GrumpyOne
07-02-2017, 12:55 AM
:D Brooks Stevens was the keynote speaker at the 1973 SDC National Meet Banquet in Colorado Springs; "I was there."

He discussed styling the 1966s on a shoe string. The one thing I remember was his revealing how they designed the front end to incorporate four of the brushed-aluminum rectangles because they had so little money. By using four little rectangles per car, the cost per unit went down, as opposed to having "make do" with a larger unit at a higher cost with only one per car.

I don't know if anyone recorded that speech. If they did, Brooks said how much money they were given to freshen up the cars for 1966. It was such a pittance it was a joke, but I don't remember the figure he cited and don't want to misquote him. :o :cool: BP


Stevens, along with Bob Bourke and Robert Andrews were the speakers at either the '73 or '74 MCS meet in Carlisle, PA and you could hear a pin drop. Brooks had a terrific slide show and narrated how the Excaliber came to be born.

One of the great events car-wise that I ever attended...

Skip Lackie
07-02-2017, 08:33 AM
Stevens, along with Bob Bourke and Robert Andrews were the speakers at either the '73 or '74 MCS meet in Carlisle, PA and you could hear a pin drop. Brooks had a terrific slide show and narrated how the Excaliber came to be born.

One of the great events car-wise that I ever attended...

Was there too, and I agree with your assessment. Robert Bourke also commented that the company had refused his request to redesign the back edge of the front fenders to reduce their propensity to rust, claiming that they would cost almost a dollar more per fender to produce. Another speaker was Bob Wallace, the president of JC Taylor Insurance, which at the time was (probably) the only company focused entirely on insuring antique cars. He had some very interesting things to say about the their interpretation of the "limited use" provisions in their policies.

junior
07-02-2017, 08:47 AM
Once again this forum is a wealth of information! Here is some more info that may be of interest...

http://www.deansgarage.com/2009/bob-marcks-designer-at-studebaker-ford-and-chrysler/

cheers. junior

tsenecal
07-02-2017, 10:24 AM
Thanks junior. Pretty cool article. Too bad some of those concepts didn't continue into the 70s.

Stu Chapman
07-02-2017, 03:21 PM
Stu Chapman, do you know the answer?

In post #7, Craig is correct. The final design was completed by Bob Marcks. However some of the running changes were begun by Canadian staff members.

Stu Chapman

Steve T
07-02-2017, 04:23 PM
Hey Stu--

This discussion about the '66s jogs my memory of something later still...namely the sketches you showed somewhere of Stude-style cues applied to early-80s Chrysler products...I remember a K-car sketch with a '66 Stude nose, and one of a circa-1981 Cordoba/Mirada with a GT Hawk-style nose on it...both looked quite worthwhile and would be interesting "phantoms" to build for real IMO!

S.

64V19816
07-03-2017, 07:24 AM
The real "magic" in getting the 66 grill right was the centralized placement of the modern Hawk emblem. It covered an awkward void. Dodge designers did not understand this with the 4 section grill used on their trucks.

Neil
07-03-2017, 08:48 AM
I think the 66 grill and 66 interiors are some of if not the best looking Studebakers built. If I had majic powers, I would build a 64 Daytona hardtop with 66 interior,66 nose and the 340 stude block with powershift. I am too old now to really handel a 4-speed well.

Stu Chapman
07-03-2017, 10:22 AM
Hey Stu--

This discussion about the '66s jogs my memory of something later still...namely the sketches you showed somewhere of Stude-style cues applied to early-80s Chrysler products...I remember a K-car sketch with a '66 Stude nose, and one of a circa-1981 Cordoba/Mirada with a GT Hawk-style nose on it...both looked quite worthwhile and would be interesting "phantoms" to build for real IMO!

S.

You have a great memory Steve. Those designs are noted on page 110 of my book, "My Father The Car". They were produced by my Art Director at Chapman Morris Advertising. In fact, they were discussed in a recent recollection between Bob Marcks and me.

Stu Chapman

Stu Chapman
07-03-2017, 10:26 AM
I think the 66 grill and 66 interiors are some of if not the best looking Studebakers built. If I had majic powers, I would build a 64 Daytona hardtop with 66 interior,66 nose and the 340 stude block with powershift. I am too old now to really handel a 4-speed well.

If you go to the SDC web site and look up the 1964 Studebaker Daytona Convertible Owners Registry, you will find that we actually converted a 64 Daytona Convertible to contain 66 styling. This was all accomplished internally in Hamilton and the car still exists and is owned by a member in Ontario.

Stu Chapman

8E45E
07-27-2017, 02:57 PM
In post #7, Craig is correct. The final design was completed by Bob Marcks. However some of the running changes were begun by Canadian staff members.

I believe you stated at the banquet, it was a gentleman who was a staff member by the name of D. Holloway, correct?

Craig

Greenstude
07-27-2017, 03:40 PM
11 --- In my opinion, it would have been worth $2.00 per car to end a well-deserved long-time reputation for front-fender rust --- in addition to adding value to the car for prospective buyers.

candbstudebakers
07-28-2017, 12:08 PM
I think the 66 grill and 66 interiors are some of if not the best looking Studebakers built. If I had majic powers, I would build a 64 Daytona hardtop with 66 interior,66 nose and the 340 stude block with powershift. I am too old now to really handel a 4-speed well.

Neil, we think alike and for over 20 years have been collecting parts to make the car Studebaker should have built the 66 hard top. I have the 64 95% rust free body and frame along with the parts to change to the single head light front end, dash , and very good rust free rear fenders, doors, trunk, and front and rear seats all done in black 64 pattern since the 66 covers are NLA. At first was going to use a 1968 rebuilt 350 hp 327 with duel 4's and 4 speed along with bucket seat but as I got older and didn't really want to be shifting all the time I sold the 4 speeds I had and then the 327 engine along with the bucket seats and went to 2 door bench seat. now engine can be anything that might fit under the hood. Now at age 76 I don't feel like spending the time or money to finish the project so any one really interested in it can PM me. lots of parts for the project. I still feel it is the car Studebaker should have built.

Stu Chapman
07-28-2017, 01:32 PM
I believe you stated at the banquet, it was a gentleman who was a staff member by the name of D. Holloway, correct?

Craig

Our staff member to whom you refer was James (Jim) Holloway. He was General Manager, Parts & Service. As I recall, Jim did the primary work on the internal ventilation system we called Refreshaire.

Stu Chapman