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Dwight FitzSimons
06-23-2017, 11:32 AM
"I'll send it to the junkyard before I'll sell it for less than $xxx."

How many times have we all heard that? Yesterday, three of us traveled to Botetourt County (N of Roanoke, Virginia) to see two cars, a '56 Power Hawk and '57 Packard. My theory is that this threat is either/or: (1) A bargaining ploy, and/or (2) The seller would rather lose money than feel he'd been "taken advantage of." What say y'all?

Anyway, the Power Hawk has a lot more rust than the seller stated (when has that ever happened?), so it is really a parts car. The seller said he would send it to the junk yard before he would take less than $600. We offered $400, then $500. It has no engine or trans, and no title. The back corners of the '56 hood are damaged and every body panel, except the roof, have rust-thru. Some panels, like the doors, could be saved. The good: (1) tinted w/s, rear window, and quarter windows; (2) grille, bumpers (cores), taillamps & lenses, some trim. The interior was all there. CraigsList: https://roanoke.craigslist.org/cto/6182655119.html

The '57 Packard 4-dr was also deteriorated from long-time outdoor storage, but, upon raising the hood, there it was in all its glory, a complete, unmolested '57 Packard engine! The car has power steering, but few other options. It even had a radio block-off plate. This car was not on Craig's List.

I have names and phone numbers (and pix) for both cars if anyone is interested. These parts should be saved. But there are too many owners of these cars who do not understand that their customers are few, diminishing in number, and ageing beyond the point of taking on another project. Perhaps they also think that Studebaker parts should have the same value as Chevy, Ford, or Pontiac, for whom there are great hordes of devotees with deeper pockets.
-Dwight FitzSimons

JRoberts
06-23-2017, 11:49 AM
Yes, I have heard this before. Unfortunately since Studebakers are "rare" lots of folks think they have something much more valuable than they really are. It is crazy to be willing to take something like these two cars to the scrap yard rather than get more money than they will go for scrap, but when you sincerely overprice something that logic flies our the window.

That said sometimes we bring this upon ourselves. A friend and I have been trying to sell parts that we have gathered over the years. Some, especially the NOS sheet metal, were rejected because people were not willing to pay what we thought were fair prices. We were at York, where we sold nothing, and South Bend where finally much was sold for prices that were unreasonably low just to get rid of the stuff.

jts359
06-23-2017, 11:52 AM
Years ago there was a 34 Chevy pick up on a farm near here , The farmer wouldn't sell it , He even ran a friend off the property by threatening him with a shot gun , Anyway many attempts were made to buy that truck , You know what he did with it ? Cut it up ! Dumb S--t , You just can't reason with some people , Ed

Bill Pressler
06-23-2017, 01:46 PM
I've heard that several times over the years. Really, really makes me wonder about that person's ability to thought-process, LOL.

Mike Sal
06-23-2017, 01:53 PM
When I was a young guy, there was a small rural junkyard that was full of kool cars, one of which was a 48 Nash Ambassador. It was in pristine condition & I wanted it terribly bad. The owner wasn't interested in selling. Every few weeks I would go by & bug him about that car. One Saturday I stopped by & went out to see the car again....to find that someone had knocked out half of the windows and all of the glass from the gages on the dash. I ran up to the shop to report the vandalism & the reply I got from the old guy was "I broke them myself so you'd stop bugging me about that car!" I was heart broken. Almost every car in that yard melted into the ground by the time the old guy died....

studeclunker
06-23-2017, 02:07 PM
Selfishness and greed know no logic.

jclary
06-23-2017, 03:27 PM
Many years ago, I established certain rules for trolling the countryside looking for vintage machines and cars. First, drive a mundane "everyday" vehicle. Don't dress up. Jeans, coveralls, work boots, and dirty fingernails. A shop rag hanging out your back pocket is a plus. If you have one, don't wear your college ring. Adjust your vocabulary to the one you are hearing. However, if the person you are engaging with uses profanity, there's nothing to gain by matching that. In my case, I can talk "drawl" with the best, but never try to contrive dialect. Main thing is to be humble, friendly, and try to establish a congenial friendship.

I once stopped and engaged a guy in western North Carolina, (a true mountain man), in a conversation regarding a '58 Packard two door hardtop sitting under a tree alongside a winding road. We had a friendly conversation, and I got around to asking about the Packard. He proudly boasted that it was a very rare valuable Packard Hawk. (Actually, a sedan) In truth, it was a sad rodent house fairly well beyond reasonable restoration potential. I have had similar experiences with a Pierce-Arrow, Graham Paige, 32 Studebaker, and others. I never make an initial offer, without an indication from the owner as to what he values the vehicle. I'm always respectful, but willing to walk away. I leave my contact information, wish the person well, and state that if someone else does not buy...I might still be interested later on.

This approach has worked for me attaining two vehicles for hundreds, rather than thousands, and in a couple of cases...outright free, just for hauling them away. In regards to the the '58 Packard, '32 Studebaker, and Pierce-Arrow...not acquiring them was a blessing. In all of these, a burden of restoration, storage, and maintenance beyond reasonable resources. I don't think the rewards could have ever offset the stress.

HOXXOH
06-23-2017, 05:24 PM
I had a somewhat similar experience about 40 years ago when I acquired a '52 that was supposedly owned by a guy who had died. His parents didn't want the car, but couldn't find the title. After they searched for a couple weeks in vain, I went to get an abandoned title. The DMV clerk wanted me to post a $2000 bond for 6 months. She said "They don't make them anymore". I replied "They don't make '52 Chevies anymore either, but that doesn't make them worth $2000" and left. A bit more research ended up finding the title had never been transferred through a couple previous owners, so the one of record filed for a lost title and transferred it to me.

PackardV8
06-23-2017, 06:56 PM
from our local craigslist:


I am tired of tripping over these things, and want to SELL them to someone that loves Studebakers and can make use of them. I am not giving these away, but I am selling them for very little----$300 takes it all! Don't waste my time offering me less, I know what they are worth, and how hard they are to find. IF NO ONE WANTS THESE FOR MY PRICE, I WILL HAUL THEM TO THE LOCAL SCRAP YARD AND THEY WILL BE MELTED DOWN!!

jack vines

Chris Pile
06-23-2017, 08:39 PM
Selfishness and greed know no logic.

You forgot stupidity.

jclary
06-23-2017, 09:04 PM
from our local craigslist:

I am tired of tripping over these things, and want to SELL them to someone that loves Studebakers and can make use of them. I am not giving these away, but I am selling them for very little----$300 takes it all! Don't waste my time offering me less, I know what they are worth, and how hard they are to find. IF NO ONE WANTS THESE FOR MY PRICE, I WILL HAUL THEM TO THE LOCAL SCRAP YARD AND THEY WILL BE MELTED DOWN!!

jack vines

Interesting thing about folks that make such bold threats. Usually, if you look around, you notice there's no hauler on site to carry out the threat. If you showed up with a hauler, and offered to do it for them, they'd probably refuse the offer...especially if you charged the going rate for the haul. Even if they had the means, they're probably too lazy, or the things would not be there now.

The rate for scrap fluctuates wildly. Don't know what it is now, but there was a time that you would be charged to have an old car hauled off to a scrap yard. Around here, due to thieves stealing cars and selling them for junk, laws have changed and scrappers will not accept an intact vehicle without a title. If you separate your metals, like copper & aluminum, you have to go to the sheriff's office and get a permit. All due to thieves.

Guido
06-23-2017, 09:57 PM
As a society we have the freedom to make choices regarding our personal possessions. Who are we to criticize others because they may not adhere to the same values and ideals we have? In my view, contributors on this forum spend far too much time criticizing the actions (and possessions) of others. The bottom line is that any owner is free to make decisions on his (or her) property and complaining about it on an Internet forum isn't going to change anything.

tsenecal
06-23-2017, 10:37 PM
I suppose you are right about it being their possession, and they can certainly do what they want with it, but why smash something up (48 Nash), just to keep somebody else from having it? I have turned down requests to buy a lot of my possessions, but it was because I thought that I had a use for it, or would make a future project out of it. Often times I will give something away if I admit to myself that I don't have the time it needs, and think they will take good care of it.

Guido
06-23-2017, 11:28 PM
I suppose you are right about it being their possession, and they can certainly do what they want with it, but why smash something up (48 Nash), just to keep somebody else from having it? I have turned down requests to buy a lot of my possessions, but it was because I thought that I had a use for it, or would make a future project out of it. Often times I will give something away if I admit to myself that I don't have the time it needs, and think they will take good care of it.

Based on the information, the owner got tired of being harassed about a car he did not want to sell so he solved the problem from his vantage point. It appears that not accepting the owner's response is what did the car in.

spokejr
06-24-2017, 12:53 AM
Well, here is a rather famous example the type of begrudger we are discussing;
http://www.bayarearidersforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=485029

t walgamuth
06-24-2017, 06:43 AM
When I was a young guy, there was a small rural junkyard that was full of kool cars, one of which was a 48 Nash Ambassador. It was in pristine condition & I wanted it terribly bad. The owner wasn't interested in selling. Every few weeks I would go by & bug him about that car. One Saturday I stopped by & went out to see the car again....to find that someone had knocked out half of the windows and all of the glass from the gages on the dash. I ran up to the shop to report the vandalism & the reply I got from the old guy was "I broke them myself so you'd stop bugging me about that car!" I was heart broken. Almost every car in that yard melted into the ground by the time the old guy died....

That is wierd.

jclary
06-24-2017, 07:55 AM
Mike Sal's post reminded me of how folks can be pestered about vehicles sitting around their property. While I was gone to Vietnam, I left my hot rod '53 Chevy pick up with my parents. With full confidence he would take care of it, I handed the keys to my father and told him he could use it as if it were his. He rarely did. After I returned, He told me he got so tired of people stopping by trying to buy it, that he had to hide it behind the house.

Several years later, In my sales job, there was one particular manufacturing company about 120 miles away, that I called on about once a month. A good part of that route was on rural two lane roads. In one yard I kept seeing a vintage Corvette. It was always parked in the same spot. The grass was cut neatly, except for where the car was parked. Weeds, and grass were higher than the doors, and it was obvious that the car was just sitting, unmoved, for weeks, & months.

Finally, it got the best of me, so I stopped at the home, went to the door and knocked. A nice lady came to the door. She looked about the age of my mom at that time. I told her who I was and where I lived. Then I told her I drove by often and was interested in the car, and wanted to know if it were for sale? Suddenly, that poor woman, hesitated, and began to weep. Tears down her cheeks. Then, she told me it was her son's car. He was in prison. She did not know what would happen with the car. It was so awkward. All I could do was say "I'm so sorry." I was not prepared for her answer, and I was so embarrassed that all I could do was apologize as I excused myself, and left her weeping at the door.

To this very day, I'm reluctant to just stop an a home and inquire about anything. You never know what is going on behind the scenes when making assumptions about how things appear. In an earlier post, I made some comments about how to dress, and act, when visiting junkyards. I stand by my comments, because I have encountered so many of these folks with a permanent "chip" on their shoulders. Guido is right...it is their domain, their property, and the approach should not be intended to "fool" them, but to be respectful and friendly.

Guido
06-24-2017, 09:23 AM
Dwight may recall a gentleman named Grover Vandevener who ran a country store at the corner of Garth and Free Union Roads west of Charlottesville. He was a noted horseman and was president of the Farmington Hunt Club for over 3 decades. Across Garth Road from his store he owned a large tract of land that had a grass airport constructed on it in the late 1920's. Over time he accumulated a large collection of vehicles, mostly old trucks from the 1920's to 1940's. The trucks sat neglected for years until 1973 when an auction was held when he sold the land for it to be converted to a steeplechase venue. People came out of the woodwork to buy the vehicles as well as the contents of the hanger and former terminal building.

I was working at Lake Albemarle at the time (farther west on Garth Road) and passed the location often. After the auction a couple of buyers attempted to drive away the trucks they purchased only to have them die and then be forced to leave them on the side of the road. Luckily I was working on the day of the sale and wasn't tempted to purchase something I did not need.

JoeHall
06-24-2017, 12:14 PM
Based on the information, the owner got tired of being harassed about a car he did not want to sell so he solved the problem from his vantage point. It appears that not accepting the owner's response is what did the car in.

That's a bit of a stretch, kinda like a DV perp saying, "look what you made me do...". IMHO, whoever did the actual smashing would be responsible for the smashing.

Guido
06-24-2017, 12:25 PM
That's a bit of a stretch, kinda like a DV perp saying, "look what you made me do...". IMHO, whoever did the actual smashing would be responsible for the smashing.

I never said he didn't do the smashing, from all appearances he was tired of being asked about the car so he solved the problem. That was certainly his right though everyone might not agree with his approach.

I can certainly understand his feelings. I have a substantial chain saw collection and every time I would post pictures of a desirable saw I would get unsolicited e-mails from people wanting to buy. I got tired of dealing with the requests and decided that it wasn't worth posting pictures and having people tell me to stop hoarding saws.

t walgamuth
06-24-2017, 02:46 PM
I never said he didn't do the smashing, from all appearances he was tired of being asked about the car so he solved the problem. That was certainly his right though everyone might not agree with his approach.

I can certainly understand his feelings. I have a substantial chain saw collection and every time I would post pictures of a desirable saw I would get unsolicited e-mails from people wanting to buy. I got tired of dealing with the requests and decided that it wasn't worth posting pictures and having people tell me to stop hoarding saws.

Hey Guido, sell me that Homelite.;)

jclary
06-24-2017, 03:08 PM
Hey Guido, sell me that Homelite.;)

I'm hoarding "ONE" very small Skil brand chain saw that's been hanging in the barn for years. Waaay back in 1974, I traded an old worn out Leather jacket for it. I have no idea how old (or collectible) it is.:confused:
Guido could probably make it run.:)

Guido
06-24-2017, 03:21 PM
Hey Guido, sell me that Homelite.;)

Which one you want? I have everything from lowly 150's up through a 650 Super. I am in a selling mode and now would actually sell all but a couple dozen.

SatDocJr
06-24-2017, 05:48 PM
It's called hoarding, IMO. It's as if many an old person tells themselves: "I want to see this easily restorable rare car rot to the ground, in my front yard, and I get joy from knowing I frustrate family and strangers by doing this." But what they are are really telling themselves is: "I'm going to fix this thing up ... some day." But they NEVER will.

They do not control their minds, they are suffering from a mental disorder that affects many people and it gets worse as they get older.

tsenecal
06-24-2017, 06:19 PM
My better half thinks I may be a hoarder. (5 Larks, 2 Stude trucks, 1 Hawk ) I'm just stocking up on projects, so that when I retire I don't have to go out looking for one.

1954khardtop
06-24-2017, 07:12 PM
I was one of those I'm gonna fix it someday guys. I have a '56 Ford F-100 I've owned since 1968. It has been fixed up and worn out again several times. When I bought my house it needed a lot of work. Between raising kids and fixing the house and barn the truck got neglected for 6 or 7 years.
I thought it was out of sight behind the barn, but a corner of the cab was visible from the road. One afternoon I was sitting on the deck relaxing after a days work, and a guy came walking around the barn. He saw me and asked what I was doing with the truck. I told him I was going to fix it someday. He told me how many times he'd heard that, and how it never happens, and so on. I was nice at first, but he kept pushing. Finally I told him "that's my truck, and if I want to sit here with a beer and watch the pieces fall off that's my business". He called me an a$$hole, I called him a trespasser and told him to get lost.
I did clean out a spot for it inside after that, and fixed it and painted it the next year.

JoeHall
06-24-2017, 07:36 PM
When I lived in Carlsbad, CA long ago, my room-mate/landlady had a red, late 60s Corvette, with factory 427, and 427 script on the hood. It sat in the driveway on a cul-de-sac, but every once in awhile someone would knock on the door and try to buy it. It had not ran for maybe 15 years, and she was not sure she'd ever bother to drive it again, but was not for sale. Still, folks would leave cards and contact info, "just in case" she ever decided to sell it. I would not be surprised if it is still sitting there.

Nowadays, we tend to pathologize everything. Some folks just like to hold onto stuff for their own reasons, and may or may not explain why. As long as they aren't hurting anything or anyone, IMHO they should just be left alone. But it does gall me too, when someone has something I want, and they'd prefer to let it rot. LOL

Scott
06-24-2017, 07:49 PM
To me what's almost worse is when people will literally litter their front yards (yes!!) with junkers that are not even collectible or pleasant to look at (like 25 year old Honda Civics and 1971 Ford Galaxies), and are just too lazy to dispose of them. They'd probably sell IF someone wanted to buy them, but nobody wants to and so they sit and sit.

I've also noticed a strong correlation between how affluent a neighborhood is and how many hulks on wheels are sitting in yards.

sals54
06-24-2017, 08:02 PM
I knew a guy years ago with a 67 GTX. The trans went out on it. He could not get the money he thought it was worth, so he sold it to a junk yard. Much to his chagrin, the junk man lien saled it to himself, (through a friend) and replaced the trans and drove it for years.
Some folks are too stupid and prideful for their own good.

altair
06-25-2017, 03:12 AM
Selfishness and greed know no logic.

This fits a friend of mine, he went to a large parts sale and greedily filled his trailer with all the parts he could put in it, brought the load of treasure home and the next day took the whole load to the dump. The following 2-3 days he returned for a second load (700 miles) and also upon returning home he deposited the entire load at the dump. The whole exercise was to prevent somebody else from having the parts. There is no logic.

Dwight FitzSimons
06-25-2017, 12:16 PM
These experiences with buying and selling Studebakers & parts teach us a lot about human nature, both good and bad. I have sold parts to one of our major Studebaker vendors and found that I had underpriced the part when he said that wasn't enough and paid me more. On the other hand, when I had an R3 Avanti (B86) in the late '60's I drove it to a local SDC chapter meet. After I had given a ride to several guys one of them tried to buy my carb. enclosure. I politely said no. In a bit of a huff he said "you don't need that." Obviously, I DID need it and he DIDN'T need it for his R2. It takes all kinds.
-Dwight

Guido
06-25-2017, 06:03 PM
Dwight, your enclosure story reminds me of the time Jim Heiple came up to me at York and offered $25.00 for a distributor out of a 185 flathead. He got mad when I refused and had a few uncomplimentary words before he left. He could not understand why I would not render a running engine worthless so he could have a part off it. Just reinforced why I chose never to do any business with him.

TX Rebel
06-26-2017, 12:49 PM
[QUOTE=jclary;1060364]Many years ago, I established certain rules for trolling the countryside looking for vintage machines and cars. First, drive a mundane "everyday" vehicle. Don't dress up. Jeans, coveralls, work boots, and dirty fingernails. A shop rag hanging out your back pocket is a plus. If you have one, don't wear your college ring. Adjust your vocabulary to the one you are hearing. However, if the person you are engaging with uses profanity, there's nothing to gain by matching that. In my case, I can talk "drawl" with the best, but never try to contrive dialect. Main thing is to be humble, friendly, and try to establish a congenial friendship...


Excellent strategy, much like my own. I am a notorious bottom feeder of vintage cars, mostly Studes, buying many that others will not touch. I do not buy every car that I look at, though I still have more than I can store. To me, every car's value is a sum of it's parts. I have been the "junkman" that the seller threatened to call if he did not get his price and I arrive looking the part with older truck, rusty trailer, jeans, T-shirt & ball cap. Some find it less insulting to sell to a parts guy than to a restorer who is looking at impossibly high restoration costs, and these types frequently need their egos stroked. The worst of this kind is the jack-ass who constantly lists & re-lists the same parts car at a price no sane buyer would pay. Often, the attitude on the phone is sufficient to preclude a trip to view the car. In other cases, the seller just needs time to adjust his expectations, and for his wife/kids/civic assn./city/county to apply some pressure on him.
I have encountered many, many unrealistically greedy sellers over the past 40 something years & have heard all of the stupid reasons that the doofus thinks he will get the price he dreams of & what he will do with the car if he doesn't get his asking price. There are no limits to stupidity. They hate it when I state that if the car were a HT or conv, & if he had stored it inside for the past 4 decades, & not torn it all apart, it just might be worth the price he wants..The scary thing is that these people vote, they drive & they raise kids.

riversidevw
06-26-2017, 03:00 PM
Only a couple of times in my long car-crazed life have I been inspired to leave a note on the windshield of an automobile that caught my eye along the street. The pristine black '58 President sedan was in a parking spot in a neighboring town in the late eighties. Nothing came of it for nearly a year. Then an elderly (nearly 90) but spunky woman named Nell called, invited my wife and me to visit her and the car. Things seemed to go well until I made an offer. "My mechanic assures me this car is worth $25,000!" We left as gracefully as we could under the circumstances. Four more months pass, another call from Nell. She actually apologized, explained that her mechanic meant $2500, not $25,000. We still have the Prez. Most people in her situation have too much false pride, spitefulness and dumb stubbornness to admit a rather big error.

jclary
06-26-2017, 03:26 PM
[QUOTE=jclary;1060364]Many years ago, I established certain rules for trolling the countryside looking for vintage machines and cars. First, drive a mundane "everyday" vehicle. Don't dress up. Jeans, coveralls, work boots, and dirty fingernails. A shop rag hanging out your back pocket is a plus. If you have one, don't wear your college ring. Adjust your vocabulary to the one you are hearing. However, if the person you are engaging with uses profanity, there's nothing to gain by matching that. In my case, I can talk "drawl" with the best, but never try to contrive dialect. Main thing is to be humble, friendly, and try to establish a congenial friendship...


Excellent strategy, much like my own. I am a notorious bottom feeder of vintage cars, mostly Studes, buying many that others will not touch. I do not buy every car that I look at, though I still have more than I can store. To me, every car's value is a sum of it's parts. I have been the "junkman" that the seller threatened to call if he did not get his price and I arrive looking the part with older truck, rusty trailer, jeans, T-shirt & ball cap. Some find it less insulting to sell to a parts guy than to a restorer who is looking at impossibly high restoration costs, and these types frequently need their egos stroked. The worst of this kind is the jack-ass who constantly lists & re-lists the same parts car at a price no sane buyer would pay. Often, the attitude on the phone is sufficient to preclude a trip to view the car. In other cases, the seller just needs time to adjust his expectations, and for his wife/kids/civic assn./city/county to apply some pressure on him.
I have encountered many, many unrealistically greedy sellers over the past 40 something years & have heard all of the stupid reasons that the doofus thinks he will get the price he dreams of & what he will do with the car if he doesn't get his asking price. There are no limits to stupidity. They hate it when I state that if the car were a HT or conv, & if he had stored it inside for the past 4 decades, & not torn it all apart, it just might be worth the price he wants..The scary thing is that these people vote, they drive & they raise kids.

Barry, I'm flattered you think my comments have merit. The fact that we somewhat agree on this subject is probably why you and I have so much difficulty trying to do business with each other!:D:yeahright:;)

TX Rebel
06-26-2017, 03:38 PM
[QUOTE=TX Rebel;1060913]

Barry, I'm flattered you think my comments have merit. The fact that we somewhat agree on this subject is probably why you and I have so much difficulty trying to do business with each other!:D:yeahright:;)

John, Great minds often think alike and your biz is always welcome here!
In fact, one of my mottos is : "We cater to CASOS" LOL!
call me anytime & I will treat you right.
bh

dannyo
06-27-2017, 08:17 AM
dwight , just my take on this ,if i was in the area where the car is, i would give the guy the price for he is asking, & part it but the studie market is getting v soft every day , i buy parts for my cars from other dealers i dont have it all or could never have all at my age would not want to done almost all my adult life studies+ mopars,i have crushed my share of cars to after getting parts that was good to sell, after you pull , store, clean parts, you are lucky to make ends meet, but i do it because i have it in my blood from my dad he had a dealer ship in the 30 s , dont know why people tare things up or let them go in the ground but thay own the cars so thay can do as thay want . hard to please every one all the time & most none of the time lol.

jclary
06-27-2017, 08:29 AM
[QUOTE=jclary;1060930]

John, Great minds often think alike and your biz is always welcome here!
In fact, one of my mottos is : "We cater to CASOS" LOL!
call me anytime & I will treat you right.
bh

Geez...in view of that...I'll up my offer on those brake drums (coupla years ago) to $75 for the pair!:D;)

You deliver??:yeahright:

57pack
06-27-2017, 09:22 AM
There was a fellow in the next town over with that same mindset.
He had a 1954 Packard Caribbean Convertible with a continental kit sitting in his yard.
I approached him about purchasing the car and was promptly turned down and turned out.
I hadn't been the first to ask!
Well that car and his house over the years slowly turned back into earth.
One day years later while driving down that road I was not too surprised to see the house and Packard gone.
Later found out the owner had passed and the property sold.
There's a very nice new large home on that property now.

BILT4ME
06-27-2017, 10:58 AM
We had a few cars on the farm that were used in the past and a couple were worth "restoring" to driveable condition.

When I pressed my father about it (I was a teenager), he commented: "I'll get to those someday." Someday never came for him.

I have decided that I will not regret what I have not done, and take the time to restore my first car to whatever condition I enjoy driving it and can haul my family around in it and ENJOY it. Yes, it takes extra time and money to do that, but it's what I enjoy and I am going to enjoy it, no matter what.

My Dad had to sell his 1930 Model A to get some cash after he got out of the service, and he regretted it ever since. The kid that bought the car wrapped it around a tree 2 months later.

My brother had a 67 Camaro that our cousin had built. It was fast and fun. He sold it because he needed money and the family wouldn't fit in it. He tried to find it about 10 years ago and discovered it in a salvage yard. It too, had been wrapped around a tree.

Fortunately, I have always owned my 59 Lark with the intent to always keep it. I have paid for storage, had to get creative at times. Alas, it did not get wrapped around a tree, but the top eight feet of a tree fell on it, smashing the roof. I have straightened it so it is less noticeable, but it still sports its scars. That part was 32 years ago.

I drove it to work today. We drove it on the Hot Rod Power Tour two weeks ago.

I have stopped at homes to buy cars and dressed and talked to fit the part. Sometimes successful, sometimes not. Nowadays, I just have to keep remembering that I do not have ROOM for all those cars that I drive by and want to bring home. If I did, I would have 40 acres of "somedays".......

jackb
06-27-2017, 11:26 AM
sometimes (probably more than most would agree), the owner who seems so out of it price wise with what he's got, is just making sport of all those who ask/offer a vehicle. In many of these historical cases above, the owner is having the last laugh on the unsuspecting buyer !! Who's the spectator in the exchange ??? Maybe not you... And a CASO comment: Driving the countryside with gas prices north of $2/gal. , and in some cases "open" country.... to walk (drive) away from a $100-200. difference in ownership is pure folly. Sparing details, I drove over 200 miles this weekend to sell parts at a Zone meet. Barely made my gas money. Would have lost money if I went to the food table or stayed overnight.....

RadioRoy
06-27-2017, 02:03 PM
Many times someone has told me "my neighbor said this car is worth $XXX! My reply is, "did he offer you $XXX?" The answer is always "no." That means it is only worth what the buyer and seller agree upon.

wittsend
06-27-2017, 02:49 PM
There was an old lady near my home that had a '68 Camaro sitting in her driveway - for years. It never moved. When I would see her walking in the area she just did not look approachable. Regardless I resolved to someday ask her about the car. A few years later I saw her and the time just seemed right. We could cross paths in a convenient way. So, I pulled my car over, stopped, got out and waited for her to complete the few steps to approach me. I then politely stated that I was interested in the Camaro. She walk right by me like I wasn't even there.

Afterwards I'd periodically see what was obviously a car guy knocking on the door and would chuckle to myself that I knew what type of reception they would be getting. That car sat in the driveway unmoved for at least 15 years. Then..., one day it was gone, the home was being improved and there was a different vehicle in the driveway. I should have probably scanned the Camaro web sites shortly after it disappeared (to see if anyone had something "new" to show) but that thought came to late.

Robert Crandall
06-27-2017, 03:08 PM
A man used to show a nicely fixed up 1959 Dodge at local car shows. He told me the car sat for many years in a neighbor's driveway with him routinely asking if he could buy it. After many years of setting and deteriorating he did accomplish buying it. He moved it on a Friday after work. The next day a thunderstorm dropped a large tree where the car sat for so many years. This one was rescued just in time to give a happy ending to that story.

cultural infidel
06-27-2017, 03:28 PM
I have been watching a Mach 1 Mustang sit in the same driveway, unmoved, for 16 years. I asked about it years ago and got the, "we are going to restore it someday," line.

Spoke to someone about a late 60's Ford truck a few months back. I have seen this truck sit for the better part of 5 years. Asked if they were interested in selling... $5,000. It was "old" and "rare." It had a dented bed, rust in the quarters, plywood down for a floor in the bed. We were just looking for a beater work truck for dump runs and trips to home depot. People need to realize that Old does not equal Gold

riversidevw
06-27-2017, 08:18 PM
I never said he didn't do the smashing, from all appearances he was tired of being asked about the car so he solved the problem. That was certainly his right though everyone might not agree with his approach.

I can certainly understand his feelings. I have a substantial chain saw collection and every time I would post pictures of a desirable saw I would get unsolicited e-mails from people wanting to buy. I got tired of dealing with the requests and decided that it wasn't worth posting pictures and having people tell me to stop hoarding saws.

And of course you smashed all those chain saws beyond recognition. That'll show 'em!

(Edit) Just wanted to make the point that there's a distinction between cessation of posting images and wanton destruction.