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Okiejoe86
05-29-2017, 07:46 PM
Hey yall!!

After driving my President around all weekend I have come to the realization that driving my 2008 pickup is boring as hell!! I now want to sell it and find an old classic to drive. I am currently talking to a seller that has a 52 Studebaker pickup for sale. I want to pull the trigger and buy it, sell my newer truck, and drive the old pickup everyday.

Does anyone here drive a classic as their daily driver?

JoeHall
05-29-2017, 07:55 PM
If you are seriously looking to daily drive a Stude, make sure it is a V8. Also, not a good idea to rush the sale of your modern truck. The Stude bug that has bitten you may fade as quickly as it took hold in the first place.

Not many folks on the planet actually drive their Studes daily, though there are a few. But you can get lots of advice here on driving yours. Good luck :)

doug
05-29-2017, 08:21 PM
I haven't driven anything but s Studebaker since the mid 80's. My Lark has been more than reliable for over 20 years. 1 water pump failure.

Not for everyone, but perfect for me. I don't drive every day any more, but it is all I drive.

If you drive a car once a year, all sort of unresolved problems arise, bur constant use will find the short comings for correction. When new, these cars were use as daily drivers and are quite capable.

Commander Eddie
05-29-2017, 09:36 PM
I have a '55 President Sedan and a '61 Champ. I drive one or the other everyday to work which is 26 miles away. My commute is NEVER boring. Both vehicles are very dependable. I keep them in top shape with regular maintenance just as I did when I was a young driver. I do not miss my former modern car and truck. I thought I would miss things like A/C, cruise control, etc. After a week I never even thought about these features anymore.
I say go for it. If you are like me you will never regret it. Just keep your vehicle in good working order and you should never find yourself stranded.

joncon
05-29-2017, 09:56 PM
I drive my 63 R1 Cruiser most every day, when not driving it, my daily driver is a 70 Chevy pickup with a 402 big block. I don't drive the Studebaker in the snow, but I do the 70 truck.

63avanti.
05-29-2017, 10:05 PM
I say go for it! Have been tossing this idea around as well on my end... Only downfall here in Wisconsin is the abundance of snow and salt for 5 months a year.

JoeHall
05-29-2017, 10:47 PM
Looks like the OP is in Oklahoma, so the mild weather may be more conducive to driving a Stude year round. How about kids? I ask that due to safety, and being outvoted as they grow older.

Studes are quite receptive to drive-ability improvements, safety upgrades and added creature comforts. But that is time consuming, and can be a bit expensive. In any case, would recommend holding onto the modern truck till the bugs are ironed out of the 1952 truck. Very few Studes are turn key, or road ready upon purchase, regardless of what the seller says. Just a few precautions for the OP, so he goes in with both eyes open.

Its also lonely out there on the highway, if looking to meet Studebaker brethren along the way. In around 700,000 Studebaker miles since 1985, I can probably count on two hands, the number of fellow Studebaker drivers met on the road. That does not count, when 25-50 miles from an SDC meet. They seem to come out of the wood work then.
OTOH, I have probably seen at least 10,000 thumbs up, or AOK hand signs from brand 'x' drivers, all over the USA. LOL

70Avanti2
05-29-2017, 10:51 PM
I second not selling your modern truck for a while.

The Stude will need repairs.

When I buy a old car my first trip is never father than I can push it back. Then it becomes a weekend car. After all repairs are made then it becomes a full time car.

When driving old cars you need a back up car when repairs are needed.

I would consider having a Stude as a good weather car versus a full time car.

SuperHawk
05-30-2017, 12:21 AM
I sold my brand X in 1972. We sold the wife's brand X in 1976. Been driving Studes only since then. We've clocked over a million miles, brought our now grown-up kids back from the hospital when born in Studes, put a camper on the back of the Champ, towed a boat, and done pretty much everything with them that other people do with their ordinary cars. Gotta tinker sometimes. More time consuming is adding A/C, Turner brakes, etc.

All in all, no regrets. And think of all we've saved in depreciation by not having to buy a new car every 5 or 7 years.

Scott
05-30-2017, 12:50 AM
Why a V8? If he lives where there aren't a lot of hills to climb a 6 works fine. I had a 57 Silver Hawk 6 with automatic and I was fine in the Bay Area in the 1980s. Sixes are NOT obsolete!!

If you are seriously looking to daily drive a Stude, make sure it is a V8. Also, not a good idea to rush the sale of your modern truck. The Stude bug that has bitten you may fade as quickly as it took hold in the first place.

Not many folks on the planet actually drive their Studes daily, though there are a few. But you can get lots of advice here on driving yours. Good luck :)

TWChamp
05-30-2017, 05:08 AM
My two 1950 Commanders and 1952 Land Cruiser were my only cars in the later 60's and early 70's, and they served me well. Last year I was hoping my modern car would self destruct so Studebaker would once again be my daily driver, but then reality set in, and I just don't have the heart to destroy a Studebaker with road salt for 6 months of the year. I also like the great fuel economy and air conditioning, and reclining seats in my 1999 Olds. I find my Studebaker 6 cylinder engines have all the power I need, so I've never felt the need for a V8, even though my 52 Land Cruiser had plenty of power.

I just chanced insurance companies and now have a limit of 1000 miles a year on my 1950 Champion. I might check into upping that limit though.

plee4139
05-30-2017, 05:19 AM
Yes, new cars are boring, but they're also safer, more economical, less polluting, more reliable, and have better handling, brakes, and steering. Upgrading and old truck will be very expensive, and ultimately what you'll have is a new truck with an old body. I had a near-death experience with my Sky Hawk and it was then that I realized how dangerous driving an old car can be. I have only lap belts which just serve to keep me in the car during a crash, but no three-point belts, air bags, or padded surfaces. I was lucky to be able to stop in time, but the wheels locked up and I could smell the burning rubber as I finally skidded to a halt. Sure, my car's all steel and not plastic, ant the other car might have been badly damaged, but with all the safety gear on his BMW, he would probably have walked away while I was on my way to the ER. Think about it.

JoeHall
05-30-2017, 08:07 AM
Yes, new cars are boring, but they're also safer, more economical, less polluting, more reliable, and have better handling, brakes, and steering. Upgrading and old truck will be very expensive, and ultimately what you'll have is a new truck with an old body. I had a near-death experience with my Sky Hawk and it was then that I realized how dangerous driving an old car can be. I have only lap belts which just serve to keep me in the car during a crash, but no three-point belts, air bags, or padded surfaces. I was lucky to be able to stop in time, but the wheels locked up and I could smell the burning rubber as I finally skidded to a halt. Sure, my car's all steel and not plastic, ant the other car might have been badly damaged, but with all the safety gear on his BMW, he would probably have walked away while I was on my way to the ER. Think about it.

I cannot argue with anything you say here. Many others understand your logic, and made choices accordingly over the years. I totally understand. OTOH, Studes are probably as safe as motorcycles, and there are still millions of those on the road. But the real, "rice rockets" are mostly ridden by the younger crowd. I used to ride Harleys of 1960s-1970s vintage. Studes are like those Harleys were: ride awhile, the fix awhile.

In the late 1990s, I chatted with an elderly couple at the SDC Meet in Texas. I had driven to the meet from SoCal in the 56J. They said they'd love to have driven their Stude to Texas, but seldom drive it anywhere, due to safety concerns, and creature comforts. I understand their position more and more as time goes by. But for now, will continue to exercise my Studes every chance I get. LOL

doublepaddle
05-30-2017, 08:54 AM
I have been driving my truck as a daily driver for 5 years now. ('57 Transtar Deluxe) The biggest problem I have with it is I cannot just hit a store and go. Someone will always come over and check it out and have some stories. I now allow 5- 10 minutes extra for each venture out of the house. The town is only 12 miles from my house and the truck has a V8 and auto trans.

junior
05-30-2017, 09:15 AM
...Studes are quite receptive to drive-ability improvements, safety upgrades and added creature comforts. But that is time consuming, and can be a bit expensive. In any case, would recommend holding onto the modern truck till the bugs are ironed out of the 1952 truck. Very few Studes are turn key, or road ready upon purchase, regardless of what the seller says. Just a few precautions for the OP, so he goes in with both eyes open. ...



exactly the route that I chose...coming up to a year now and no regrets, and now just about ready to part with my 'new-ish' 2008 Chevy truck with only 21,000 miles on the clock. Now that I no longer have to work for a living I find it that this is working for me. If I had to still do the daily grind and drive to work I may choose to drive modern but that's only because of the harsher winter climate that I live in. Last winter though, the old farm truck worked like a charm, but still needs work. In less than a year I have put more money into the old clunker than I purchased it for, and it still needs more work...electric fuel pump upgrade, new wood for the box floor, install a block heater and on goes the list. I love driving it, and never find it boring. My biggest headache is convincing Mrs. Junior this is a good idea...she has an issue with zero sound system, rattles, crappy defroster, no fuel injection, no power steering or brakes etc...but me, well I have no regrets. As an aside, my oldest daughter christened the truck the 'Badger'...for any of you folks who know of the 'honey badger' video on youtube you'll understand. This old farm truck don't give a s*it about nothing...lol cheers, junior

jclary
05-30-2017, 09:22 AM
I don't think there's a "right, or wrong" here. My philosophy is "whatever works," and what makes you comfortable/confident. It is human nature, that dependency promotes hostility. Meaning, if you become too "beholding," to anyone or anything, for your well being, anyone or anything, can let you down disappoint, and cause disharmony. Whether a mate, friend, partner, home, car, or appliance, it is always good to not allow (or perceive) yourself to become too dependent.

Fortunately, for me, I always had employment that allowed me some flexibility. But, if you have a boss who has no affinity for "old cars," the "sorry I'm late, but I broke down" excuse will wear very thin very quickly. If you are a Doctor, with a patient awaiting surgery at 5:30 AM...your cool "vapor locked" Avanti excuse will not get you admired. Life is full of risks, and for those who live in a virtual fetal position of fear, perhaps you need a different hobby.

For me, at my age, I'm in the "comfort/confidence" range these days. If I'm in the mood to drive one of my Studebakers, willing to be comfortable with no air conditioning, the lovable old technology, willing to risk old component failure, vapor lock, etc., reasonably confident I'll get where I'm going, and return...then game on. Otherwise, I'm in the later model stuff, utilitarian trip, and done. The other day, I fired up my Motorcycle for the first time in weeks. I discovered a small gas leak. For the first time ever, until I find where it is coming from, and fix it, I'll not use the motorcycle. No confidence...no fun. Happy I'm not dependent on it for daily transportation.

JoeHall
05-30-2017, 09:23 AM
For about 10 of the 12+ years in California, basically 1985-2000, I owned nothing but Studes. No reason for anything else, other than creature comforts, safety, and dependability. Then too, in the mid 1980s, Studes were not so far behind in technology, but Studes continue to stand still, as technology marches on. Today, even a 1966 Stude's technology is equivalent to what a Model 'A' was in the mid 1980s. But if we never let ourselves get too spoiled with modern vehicles, Studes are not so hard to live with. That's why I try to stay out of modern brand 'x' vehicles; makes it harder to get back into a Stude.

Since coming to KY in 2000, I have had a winter rat brand 'x'. I tried to drive the 62GT one winter, and would never do that to it again. Till now, rust is seeping through in places it never had rust before. If I still lived in the desert, or anywhere south, I like to think I'd still be driving nothing but Studes.

Okiejoe86
05-30-2017, 10:15 AM
Man oh Man I love the feedback!! I am going to go look at the truck tomorrow. I appreciate all the info! Keep the stories coming!

-Joe

Commander Eddie
05-30-2017, 10:47 AM
Be sure to send us photos of the truck if you get it. You can start a new thread in Member's Studebaker pictures.

BILT4ME
05-30-2017, 01:03 PM
We ALMOST drive our Stude every day.

Between our son and I, we have to negotiate WHO gets to drive it on a given day.

Yes, you NEED a second car that is running while the Stude is down for repairs. An example if if the points go out and you don;t already have a set in hand, you must wait while they ship in. I would not have said that 30 years ago, as I could get parts in every auto parts store, but not anymore.

Right now, we don;t drive it when it's raining because the wiper motor is out. We DO Rain-X the windows and that makes a HUGE difference, but in heavy, slow traffic, I still need to see on the interstate.

We absolutely LOVE driving it and second the number of other Stude drivers we meet and the number of thumbs-ups we get.

Whenever we pull into ANY car show, we get LOTS of people coming over to look. Now we take pictures of people taking pictures of our car.

jackb
05-30-2017, 03:26 PM
I sold my late model GMC Sierra and bought my 53' 2R6..... bought a nice 2008 vehicle for everyday driving. Truck is mostly for working truck duties, but I get behind the wheel 2-3 times a week. As an aside, and just for giggles..... I recently needed to perform expansion plug replacement needing removal of engine. I ordered 24 NOS Stude parts from a friendly vendor and received them in 24 hours. Went to NAPA to by a replacement lower radiator hose..... they got it in 3 days....go figure...

Noxnabaker
05-30-2017, 04:10 PM
If you sort out the electrics & the mechanics GOOD like I did, then there aint much of a problem!
But make SURE the brake cylinders are new, don't bother repair kits as you'll have trouble soon enough, "been there - done that"(in my younger days) = expensive...
Fresh crank seals in engine, gearbox & rear axle & such is also a saver in many ways.
& as same as the brakes: steering equipment too needs to be tight!
There's parts enough to get for nice prices...
(& yep: I have a Studebaker because I wanna DRIVE a Studebaker!)

Hallabutt
05-30-2017, 05:09 PM
Joe,

You might as well read this as the no apology admission of a car collector. For me being a care collector means having at the ready one or more cars that satisfy my needs when the time is right. My newest car is now twenty two years old, so each time that I choose one of my five designated drivers I have something that I enjoy driving. I am never bored by what I drive. After twenty years old most of my cars models are seldom seen on the road today. Having only older cars means that I must have absolute confidence in any one of them that I choose for a long road trip, and I do travel! Unfortunately cars do develop problems and when they do I find it an easy and seamless transition to slip into one of the others. My collector cars are a separate thing altogether, and they are driven when I choose. For me the 52 truck would just not stand the comfort and the reliability tests that I demand of my drivers.

Your 2008 bores you so it's time to move on to something more exciting. For me the answer would be as simple as getting ride of the boring ride and getting something older that I found interesting. For me for reasons already mentioned in #12, the 52 truck would not be my choice for a daily driver. The old body just wouldn't hold up (mine not the truck's). If you have fallen in love with the 52 go for it, but don't paint yourself into a corner and not have a plan "B." For me it's as simple as having a car for all seasons and for all reasons.

Mike Van Veghten
05-30-2017, 06:30 PM
My 59 Lark 2dr. wagon is my daily driver.
It will (hopefully !) soon be sold and replaced by my 54 Conestoga..daily driver.

Mike

stude truck 55
05-30-2017, 09:58 PM
I drive my 55 E-7 truck ( v-8-auto) just about everyday in the fair weather months here in Pa. mostly short trips (hour or less) only due to the fact that the cab and seat are not that roomy or comfortable if your north of 6 foot tall ! The other issue in the summer is the intense heat that pours into the cab from the engine compartment and metal dash that radiates heat as if the radiator was in the cab with you, I can only compare it to turning your stoves oven to about 150 deg. climbing in and closing the door for an hour or so ! Not complaining, just the facts, as it is really a neat truck and you get lots of looks and comments when your out in it , but driving an old stude truck as your daily driver is not for the faint of heart ! May want that back up for longer summer trips , Good luck and enjoy !

JoeHall
05-30-2017, 10:52 PM
I drive my 55 E-7 truck ( v-8-auto) just about everyday in the fair weather months here in Pa. mostly short trips (hour or less) only due to the fact that the cab and seat are not that roomy or comfortable if your north of 6 foot tall ! The other issue in the summer is the intense heat that pours into the cab from the engine compartment and metal dash that radiates heat as if the radiator was in the cab with you, I can only compare it to turning your stoves oven to about 150 deg. climbing in and closing the door for an hour or so ! Not complaining, just the facts, as it is really a neat truck and you get lots of looks and comments when your out in it , but driving an old stude truck as your daily driver is not for the faint of heart ! May want that back up for longer summer trips , Good luck and enjoy !
My older brother restored a 49 Stude pickup, and installed a Stude 289, with T89 transmission, and 3.5 ratio, 9" Ford rear end. He went to great lengths to insulate the firewall, and installed AC with heat core included in the AC unit, which hangs under dash. He says it will freeze you out in summer, and bake you in winter. But he has not came up with a way to accommodate his, "north of 6 foot" frame either. The one regret he has is, he did not shorten the bed about 6-12", and extend the cab by the same length. He coulda had that much more leg room. It woulda been a sin for purist, but woulda made the truck soo much more enjoyable to drive.

lumpy
05-30-2017, 11:12 PM
My daily driver is a 56 chevy pu , gets driven hard every day ,no ac has disc brakes , power steering ,5spd manual trans. I have auto crossed this truck at good guys events and driven it to the hot rod reunion in bakersfield several times. One month after building it 6 yrs ago drove it to Pleasanton good guys event, and then took the wife on a wine cruise thru napa valley:D Its not a polished show truck ,It still wears most of its original paint. Funny how you can be having a rough day and get behind the wheel of a classic vehicle and suddenly its all better! By the way my truck has never left me stranded…now that I've said that I might end up walking to work tomorrow :lol:

t walgamuth
05-30-2017, 11:24 PM
I've been trying to drive my cE every day rain is not expected. Its pretty fun.

mbstude
05-31-2017, 08:19 AM
Hey yall!!

After driving my President around all weekend I have come to the realization that driving my 2008 pickup is boring as hell!! I now want to sell it and find an old classic to drive. I am currently talking to a seller that has a 52 Studebaker pickup for sale. I want to pull the trigger and buy it, sell my newer truck, and drive the old pickup everyday.

Does anyone here drive a classic as their daily driver?

It's a romantic idea and I'm all for it.. But be realistic about it. Unless it's a fresh total restoration, you're going to doing some repairs as you put the miles on.

If you can, spend a couple of hours in traffic and on the highway behind the wheel before you buy it and commit to making it an everyday ride.

The C Cab trucks are my favorite Studebakers and I've had 4 of them. The only one I still own is a 59 pickup that was my only car a decade ago, when I was in high school. I'm in the beginning of a full body off restoration and when it's done in a couple of years, I'm planning on putting as many miles on it as I can. It'll have a 259, T85 OD, 3.54 rear, a.c., disc brakes, a few leaves removed from the rear springs, and as many new parts as my wallet can stand in order to make it drive as good as it can in stock form.

These trucks are a blast to drive (I'm 5'7 and 155 pounds, so I fit in it just fine), but they're a handful and anything but comfortable. If you're up for the rough ride and spending time turning wrenches when needed... Go for it.

showbizkid
05-31-2017, 02:49 PM
I work from home, so my '63 Lark is my only personal car (wife has a Honda Pilot and the boy has a Ford Escape). I love my Stude and the looks I get when I'm out in it. That said, I think I would think twice about making it a daily commute-to-work vehicle, for the same reasons Matt cites above. And yes, even with only 1,000 miles a year on it, I still have to keep it up - last winter it was out of service for 4 months with a fuel delivery problem that I didn't have time to suss out immediately. And, as I get older, the lack of things such as power steering, disc brakes and a modern ventilation system are slight detractors for everyday use. Maybe I'm just being a wimp, though.

So think good and hard about it before you commit :)

jclary
05-31-2017, 04:42 PM
...And, as I get older, the lack of things such as power steering, disc brakes and a modern ventilation system are slight detractors for everyday use. Maybe I'm just being a wimp, though.

So think good and hard about it before you commit :)

Well Clark...one of the "perks" of getting older...what once could have qualified for "Wimp" status...evolves into "Wisdom.";):)

showbizkid
05-31-2017, 05:36 PM
"Wimp" status...evolves into "Wisdom.";):)

LOL!!! Indeed!

Another bit of wisdom gained: those chrome-tipped straight dual exhaust sure looked great when I put them on... but the lack of downward angle guarantees that the slipstream sucks CO back into the cabin when the windows are down. (Just tossin' that out there...!)

Okiejoe86
06-01-2017, 08:42 AM
Looked at the truck... found a couple of rust spots... should I be worried? When I tapped on it, it still felt solid.
64523645246452564525

Commander Eddie
06-01-2017, 10:01 AM
There is so much metal on those old trucks that the rust has to be pretty bad to rust through. Except for the rust hole on the front of the truck the rest of that looks like surface rust and can be easily dealt with. Get yourself a wire wheel, sandpaper, rust inhibitor, primer and touch up paint and have a good time. Or take it to a good body and paint shop. ;)

jackb
06-01-2017, 11:14 AM
..... that looks like very significant surface rust. Repeat... surface rust. However being so, there are other areas of the truck that would/could be well structurally compromised at this stage of the truck's rust ! Check the front lip of the hood. Check the floors and back corners of the cab. Check the foot well (?) step, up front for repairs or rust through.... These areas might be in trouble too.....Looks like fresh paint covered up a lot of rust.... (seeing from here...)

Noxnabaker
06-01-2017, 11:51 AM
Kinda "deep-ends" on how deep the pittings (rust valleys) are, but if you heat it up until you just can't touch it -NOT MORE- it'll burn the rust-acid out & then put on whatever covers it REALLY good!
But yeah, that looks looks plastic padding on the front & someone covered something up & then it'll be more in other places, go there again with a magnet...

Skip Lackie
06-01-2017, 05:22 PM
As others noted, those are not places that Stude trucks normally rust -- but they ARE places that are hard to sand/prepare for paint, which might be an indicator of how bad the rust was in the usual places that are easier to fix with bondo and paint. Lie on the ground and stick your head under the lower edge of the running boards and look for serious repairs to the step plates. Also: flat area of floors, inside rear edge of front fenders.

mbstude
06-01-2017, 05:39 PM
Just from those pics, that looks like a cheapie/quickie paint job in "resale red" with really poor paint prep. I'd be concerned about what's underneath the rest of the paint.

JoeHall
06-01-2017, 05:45 PM
Depending on price, mechanical condition, and your plans for the truck, it could be a good buy, or one to walk away from. If you just want one that is fairly presentable, and primary focus is on driving, that one may work for you. In that case, I'd look at the mechanicals closely and carefully, and do an extensive test drive. I am not much on Stude trucks, but doubt that one would bring much over $5000.

SN-60
06-01-2017, 07:40 PM
As previously posted, it's pretty hard to beat a '66-'85 Avanti for an everyday transportation piece for someone desiring to drive around in 'STUDEBAKER STYLE'!!

The 'no rust ever' fiberglass body, the bulletproof Studebaker frame & suspension, and the ease of maintaining a small block Chevy V-8!....NICE:D!!!!

Also, prices for 'decent' '66-'85 Avantis are usually quite reasonable....most have A/C and other modern amenities.

'ASK THE MAN THAT DRIVES ONE!!:!:....I purchased my '83 Avanti with about 95K on it, and she now has about 350K!!! (Summer & Winter miles)

tbredehoft
06-01-2017, 09:59 PM
I bought a '55 President State Sedan about 9 years ago, spent 2 years making it road worthy, Been driving it as every day since. However. sometimes that becomes every week. I'm retired, don't hit the road a lot. I've put on 11,000 since then. I do have a new, leased transportation for distance, (over 100 miles round trip) but don't hesitate to use the Stude whenever wheels are needed. I'm about ten miles from "town" so it gets good and warm each trip. In bringing it back to life, I replaced everything that could fail, put in independent front seats with 3 point belts and have no concerns that it will stop on me. Oh. The leased car is all wheel drive, it gets workout in snow.

studeclunker
06-03-2017, 06:00 PM
Joe, unless the price is a steal, I would pass. That one looks like a 'Bondo Beauty.' Do listen to Matt, young he may be, but smart as paint, is Matt! You can see that right off (to Paraphrase old Long John). As to the trucks, My choice would be to go with '56 and on. The had twelve volt standard and the cab hass decent leg-room, except in the Champs.

My current 'Driver' is a '60 Champ (Wilbur). The legroom and head room is a bit wanting, if tolerable. With a modern air-conditioner kit, it would be an ideal drive. However in my case, that's out of the question. Carrying capacity is good, as is towing. With a (tired) 245 six the old man handles my 20 ft. travel trailer with aplomb. A V8 would handle the hills a lot better as my '62 Champ used to do very well indeed.

I agree wholeheartedly with the philosophy to keep your brand-x truck for now. These trucks don't drive anywhere nice as your President does. You might want to give the Studebaker truck a honeymoon before unloading the brand-x. I also drive a '96 Chevy for the lady I work for. It is a lot nicer to tow with than Wilber ('60 Champ) is. Me, I'd much rather a Studebaker in anything I do. That's my preference though.

Sdude
06-04-2017, 06:44 PM
64629 I use my truck when I want to. I spent a lot of money on it but I don't need any more trophies or accolades. I need a truck and I've got one. I did, however, upgrade the running gear so it is not like driving an old truck, it drives like a new truck. As others have said, just be prepared to spend a little time talking about it when you stop. I sure don't mind that. I already have a few blemishes in it so I no longer have to stress about getting a scratch in it. I wouldn't have it any other way.