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View Full Version : 1952 Champion Hardtop on eBay



61LaRk4dr
05-24-2017, 01:13 PM
Pretty much a fully loaded Champion.....as fully load as one could be. Seems to be only missing the A/T (though would have been sluggish) and the tissue dispenser. The car is even equipped with the very hard to find rear fender spears. Front fender spears appear to be off of a 1951 model. Would be interesting to see the production order for this one unless all of the extras were installed at the dealer.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1952-Studebaker-CHAMPION-REGAL-2-DOOR-HARDTOP-COUPE-CHAMPION-REGAL-/172684203883?hash=item2834c7d76b:g:Qh4AAOSwX9FZH0R3&vxp=mtr

kmul221
05-24-2017, 02:14 PM
I seen a pair of those rear fender spears on a parts car in Minaker's Wreckers in Picton Ontario a few years ago,didn't realize how rare they were at the time.By the time this one is up to snuff $15-20K easy.Better to buy a better one.

Michidan
05-24-2017, 03:18 PM
The rear spears are rare, although Stephen Allens had 2 sets a month ago. One is mine now, they may still have the other.
As incorrect as the front spears are, they do kind of fit will with the hood ornament.

The car itself looks pretty solid. I see some issues with the hog trough and batwing in one photo, but the trunk and the rest is WAY better than I started with. Sure the chrome would be expensive to restore, but that comes with the territory here.

Seeing my project car getting picked up with a forklift doesn't really excite me to purchase.

52-fan
05-24-2017, 06:24 PM
Pretty much a fully loaded Champion.....as fully load as one could be. Seems to be only missing the A/T (though would have been sluggish) and the tissue dispenser. The car is even equipped with the very hard to find rear fender spears. Front fender spears appear to be off of a 1951 model.

To me, the 3 speed with overdrive would be a plus with the Champion engine.

BobPalma
05-24-2017, 07:08 PM
:) Studebaker's 1952 Starliner hardtops have always fascinated me as being so terribly uncompetitive when it came to price; I've often thought, how did Studebaker dealers ever sell any of them?

Case in point: This 1952 Champion Regal Starliner originally had a base MSRP of $2,220 before accessories or freight. By contrast, you could walk across the street to the Ford dealer and buy a 1952 Crestline Victoria (2-door hardtop) for $1,925...and it had a V8 engine standard equipment! If payments might have been $50 a month back then, you had to make roughly NINE additional payments to own the 6-cylinder Champion! :eek: YIKES!

Even so, of the 11 1952 Champion models Studebaker offered, only 3 of them bettered the Starliner's production of 12,119:

Champion Deluxe 4-door sedan: 24,542. Champion Regal 4-door sedan: 20,566. Champion DeLuxe 2-door sedan: 12,989. The Starliner outsold the 7 other 1952 Champion models.

(By contrast, Ford sold 77,320 1952 Crestline Victoria V8 2-door hardtops.:eek:) ;) :cool: BP

dpson
05-24-2017, 09:55 PM
What I find incredible is that Studebaker would spend the money on the development and tooling for a one year hardtop model, knowing that in 1953 an entire new line of cars would be introduced which would have virtually no carryover of body parts from the previous (47 -52) body line. It seems like a big investment for a small automobile company, but the bean counters must have run the numbers and deemed it worthwhile.

52-fan
05-24-2017, 10:31 PM
This was the centennial model and the reality of the drop off in sales after the boom after WWII had not set in. For a while people would buy anything with wheels, but that was over.

Michidan
05-25-2017, 08:39 AM
:) Studebaker's 1952 Starliner hardtops have always fascinated me as being so terribly uncompetitive when it came to price; I've often thought, how did Studebaker dealers ever sell any of them? BP

Because they're pretty :)


I get told a lot my car must be "rare" and I suppose it is now. But total Champion and Commander production was over 26,000. Not bad at all really.

Michidan
05-25-2017, 08:48 AM
What I find incredible is that Studebaker would spend the money on the development and tooling for a one year hardtop model, knowing that in 1953 an entire new line of cars would be introduced which would have virtually no carryover of body parts from the previous (47 -52) body line. It seems like a big investment for a small automobile company, but the bean counters must have run the numbers and deemed it worthwhile.

Well, the convertible was already there, which helped a lot. And I think the disappointment of having to roll out the 47-51 body shell one more time made mgmt realize they better do something - anything - to add a little spark into the years offerings. What better solution that a snazzy hardtop, the likes of which had been selling like hotcakes for GM for 3 years already!
For the cost of a roof stamping and a few pieces of trim they got a good deal of advertising mileage out of it.

6hk71400
05-25-2017, 08:45 PM
There was (and I think still is) a group of faithful, loyal Studebaker owners that always would buy a car when it was time for a new one. Sure the 1952 production was down from 1951 but probably in the showroom was the hardtop and if "Dad" was thinking time to replace the older car he would probably stop by to see the new hardtop but leave with a deluxe four door. That is probably why the 58's sold but most of them were Scotsman's. The older Land Cruiser buyer probably would step up to a President and if feeling sporty would spring for the hardtop.

The faithful to probably hold on to there favorite, but if a bargain shows up, probably will snap it up

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ