PDA

View Full Version : Studebaker ww2 b17 bomber engine plate.



HAWK64
05-24-2017, 02:51 AM
64368 The B17 engines built by Studebaker during WW2 had this plate attached with the earlier & famous "Wheel" logo in the upper left corner even though they had discontinued it back in the thirties for the later red ball design. Do any of our informed Studebaker Forum followers have any idea why the earlier design was brought back in the forties?

skyway
05-24-2017, 01:02 PM
Smart-alek in me thinks either:

"Cuz they are both radial designs", or
"To visually compliment the firing order diagram in the upper right corner."

thunderations
05-24-2017, 01:10 PM
Left over ID tags from earlier cars and trucks modified to fit the information required?

HAWK64
05-24-2017, 09:14 PM
Smart-alek in me thinks either:

"Cuz they are both radial designs", or
"To visually compliment the firing order diagram in the upper right corner."
Who knows, Studebaker could have been thinking the same thing. Thanks Skyway.

sgriggs
05-25-2017, 12:42 PM
How hard is it to find one of these B17 Stude engine plates? They sure are neat.

Scott Griggs
Louisville, KY

Mike Sal
05-25-2017, 01:27 PM
I am a ww2 reenactor & have spent time with several of the confederate airforce guys who fly the few 17's which are left. They tell me most of the surviving engines were built by Studebaker. They tell me most of the Studebaker engines were designated to the "service & replacement" stocks. As a result as the original Wright engines wore out, they were replaced by Studebaker engines. Don't know how much truth there is to that, but that's what they told me.

They had a 17 in to a local airport a few years ago giving (or rather selling) rides. One of the cylinder heads developed a crack so they had to pull that cylinder & have a replacement flown in from somewhere else. The guys took it all in stride & didn't raise any sweat over it. It was fun watching them use those 2 and 3 foot long wrenches to reach down in between those cylinders.
Mike Sal

Gunslinger
05-25-2017, 05:33 PM
There are sources that state Studebaker was the prime supplier of R-1820 engines for a good part of the war and that only Studebaker built engines went in all B-17 production from January 1944 through the end of B-17 production. That's probably a good reason why most existing engines are Studebaker built.

Curtiss-Wright was probably very busy with producing other engines and the tremendous design and production effort in making the R-3350 engines for the B-29 program.

HAWK64
05-25-2017, 11:51 PM
How hard is it to find one of these B17 Stude engine plates? They sure are neat.

Scott Griggs
Louisville, KY

I picked mine up on Ebay six years ago at which time I paid $82. This one is the best example I have seen & it had belonged to the seller's Grand Father who was a B17 crew member in England during WW2 & brought it home with other souvenirs. I must confess they are hard to find so good luck.

HOXXOH
05-26-2017, 02:47 AM
64368 The B17 engines built by Studebaker during WW2 had this plate attached with the earlier & famous "Wheel" logo in the upper left corner even though they had discontinued it back in the thirties for the later red ball design. Do any of our informed Studebaker Forum followers have any idea why the earlier design was brought back in the forties?

I suspect having to add red was an added expense and time consuming. Without the red the logo is blah.

kurtruk
05-27-2017, 12:45 AM
64368 The B17 engines built by Studebaker during WW2 had this plate attached with the earlier & famous "Wheel" logo in the upper left corner even though they had discontinued it back in the thirties for the later red ball design. Do any of our informed Studebaker Forum followers have any idea why the earlier design was brought back in the forties?

Brought back? Maybe different in Australia, but I think the wheel logo was continuously used on auto ID plates at least through 1948 (the newest Stude I currently own).