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556063
05-19-2017, 04:00 PM
Sad - My first paying job in the 70's and my Dad's first paying job in the 40's was delivering the Tribune. I stopped my subscription in December 2008, and that's all I'm going to say about that. Obviously, not as significant as December 1963. But still, the end of an era, and painful as South Bend's influence continues to slip. Digital is no doubt hurting them. But circulation in the areas around South Bend is nothing like it still is in South Bend. The areas around South Bend are different than South Bend, and Tribune tubes on mailboxes are as rare as hens teeth in surrounding counties today:

http://www.indianaeconomicdigest.net/main.asp?SectionID=31&SubSectionID=62&ArticleID=88111&TM=53315.77

r1lark
05-19-2017, 04:28 PM
I wonder what will happen to their archives? They has to be tens of thousands of Studebaker and Studebaker-related items in their archives.

556063
05-19-2017, 06:35 PM
The paper will continue on - it will just not be printed in South Bend. The Editorial Staff and the Paper itself will go on as before. It will just be printed 80 miles away and trucked in every day. Only the printers and laborers in the press room will be let go.

Many surrounding small town papers have made similar decisions. My hometown paper is now printed in Columbia City and trucked in 60 miles every day.

Seems to me, the Tribune could have tried to court other local papers, and take this surrounding printing business on, and remain a production center over the past few years. They built that new press only 20 years ago. The Tribune used to be THE source for local news in surrounding counties, often more accurate than the local paper, and had offices and staff in each surrounding county. They de-emphasized those features, dropped many of their popular locally themed features, and became more "National" the past decade. It didn't work, and it's even hard to find a place to buy it Sunday morning anymore. The Fort Wayne area and Grand Rapids, MI are leaving South Bend in the dust.

The Tribune will still be in business, but not as a printer.

rstrasser
05-19-2017, 07:12 PM
You will most likely find that the paper will now go to bed earlier. Unlike the previous midnight or later in order to fit in with other local papers being printed in a central printing plant. You will loose any late news and the paper will become useless; just like our local paper. The local school board election results were published 36 hours later. Along with any news after 10 PM. No sports finals.
With our local paper; they were making money but the parent company was not; and they needed to save every cent they could. As with the South Bend paper the press was less then 20 years old.
Ron

556063
05-19-2017, 08:01 PM
The Tribune and it's parent company, Schurz Communications, had almost a monopoly on media in South Bend my entire life. The Tribune owned WSBT (note the call letters), the local CBS TV Affiliate, and several AM and FM Radio stations since the 50's. Schurz sold WSBT-TV last year, after building a brand new studio in Mishawaka. Sinclair Broadcasting bought WSBT, and that new state of the art studio is producing TV for surrounding markets as far away as Toledo, OH. So Schurz did help the area there. But, the Tribune was always independent and steadfastly very protective of it's monopoly. I don't think it would have ever crossed the management at the Tribune's mind they'd need to look at diversifying their printing business. Other papers in other markets did. And now, the Tribune, formerly the biggest force in a metropolitan area of 1 million, has been forced to the same mode of operation as my paper in a town of 10,000.

The major TV competitor in the market since the 50's was WNDU (Notre Dame University). Notre Dame University sold it's TV operations to Gray Communications about three years ago. In fact Gray bought WSBT and then sold it to Sinclair due to funky FCC Regulations when the transactions were completed.

The result of all this, none of the local TV stations are owned locally, and the Tribune has been reduced to operate like the Plymouth Pilot-News and the Rochester Sentinel. Other than the TV Studio, South Bend is not a regional hub any longer.

jclary
05-19-2017, 08:32 PM
Last year, I too cancelled my paper subscription. I would have done it sooner, but my Wife insisted we continue so she could keep getting her sports pages and the obituary notices. Finally, with the new smart phone I bought her, she has learned how to access the local obits, and all the sports news she can absorb.:)

When I called the paper to cancel the subscription, I was asked why. I explained that they no longer had anything of value to offer. My weekly church newsletter contained about as much local news. If it were not for them adding most of the USA Today content, the paper wouldn't be much thicker than a church bulletin. Add to that, their writings attempting to dismantle common sense living, and mainstream perversion & deviance, was too much for me to continue supporting with my money.:( Instead, the annual money, spent on the paper, would buy my wife & I a top of the line set of tires!

We have by our constitution, free speech. I believe it covers "freedom of the press," but "Press" is a mechanical term (now digital). Since the press has turned "unreliable," and irresponsible, I no longer choose to pay for it. Instead, I'll take advantage of all the "FREE" unreliable, irresponsible information available. Perhaps, every now and then, I'll stumble on a nugget of truth, just the same as if I were paying for it.:QQ:

But, on the bright side:), just like the swinging of a pendulum, the ebb & flow of the tides, life goes on...and perhaps someday, someone will reinvent/revive the "News." Perhaps, it will be about the same time fresh milk is delivered to your door in the morning, and there will be a family TV show, without profanity. And...perhaps, on a warm summer night, you can pile into the family car, drive down to the local drive-in, for a movie & pop corn:).....sigh....

ddub
05-19-2017, 11:07 PM
John, it is happening already. My son lives in a new subdivision and they have home delivery of milk. Something I haven't had since the 50s.

kurtruk
05-20-2017, 12:36 AM
I started throwing the paper when they switched from afternoon delivery to morning delivery in October of 1977. I just started eighth grade. Got up every morning at 4AM to insert the ads and fold and rubberband the papers. Dad usually had to get up and help me load the "saddlebags" on the back of my bike. It was a semi-rural area. No streetlights, lots of room between houses. Did it for a year until high school schedules kept me from continuing. Oh, had to spend afternoons collecting each month also. Nearly every house subscribed. I thought, "How could anyone NOT get the newspaper daily?" Just the way I was brought up.
Today, I am the ONLY subscriber on our cul-de-sac of 14 houses. Mondays and Tuesdays papers are so thin (obviously no staff to write stories on the weekend) it's probably hard for the motor carrier to toss it in my driveway without it fluttering as he goes by to wherever the next subscriber is. The subscription price has gotten outrageous. My wife wants to quit because of the price. I don't own a smartphone. I want to hold a newspaper in my hands and spend time reading it each day as I have done all my life (well before I mastered holding the paper I spread it flat on the floor).
I live in a city of over 600,000 but the paper is now printed 160 miles away. Yes, no late sports results. Really hit home when our college football team played a game in Nebraska. It was an afternoon game. The results were published Monday. :mad: Not only did they not have coverage there, they didn't even pick up a national feed! They tried dropping the baseball box scores last season, but relented and now publish the box scores of the closest teams only.
It is getting harder and harder to justify the price.

t walgamuth
05-20-2017, 07:16 AM
I delivered papers for years as a kid. I still enjoy the ritual of reading it at the table with my eggs. You can't take your computer to the john very easy either.;)

Gunslinger
05-20-2017, 08:28 AM
You can't take your computer to the john very easy either.;)

That's what iPads are for.

Chris Pile
05-20-2017, 09:13 AM
McClatchy has closed The Wichita Eagle printing presses here in Wichita, and moved production to Kansas City, where the same presses that print the Kansas City Star run everyday. I quit taking the paper a couple years ago when the Monday and Tuesday "papers" consisted of 5 sheets of newsprint. It was more like a newsletter. They offered online subscriptions with a hard copy, or a hard copy subscription with online access. WTH, people? We want one or the other - not both. Newspapers seem determined to ruin themselves, between the biased reporting and the lack of real news and services.

8E45E
05-20-2017, 11:00 AM
McClatchy has closed The Wichita Eagle printing presses here in Wichita, and moved production to Kansas City, where the same presses that print the Kansas City Star run everyday. I quit taking the paper a couple years ago when the Monday and Tuesday "papers" consisted of 5 sheets of newsprint. It was more like a newsletter. They offered online subscriptions with a hard copy, or a hard copy subscription with online access. WTH, people? We want one or the other - not both. Newspapers seem determined to ruin themselves, between the biased reporting and the lack of real news and services.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?20147-Death-of-newspapers&highlight=Newspapers

In the 1920's, it was commercial radio broadcasting which was considered a threat to newspapers.

In the 1950's, television was the next major threat to their survival.

Now with the internet, three strikes, they may be OUT!!

Craig

556063
05-20-2017, 11:24 AM
You can't have it both ways, but it's still sad to watch the declines of these institutions. Especially when they abandon logic. Think as we may about their stances, it just doesn't make sense that the Tribune and Pilot-News are 20 miles apart, and, one is printed 60 miles to the East and soon the other will be printed 80 miles to the north. Being first to press must not matter anymore because of digital. I'm not a newspaper logistics analyst, but it seems old ways of business got in the way of moves that would have made sense. I guess we will see what the Tribune will do with the beautiful newer building that housed the presses later. It will be empty soon, like the College Football Hall of Fame, etc. There are so many small papers in a 40 mile radius of South Bend. I must be missing something, maybe the presses weren't competitive with newer machinery?

rbruner
05-20-2017, 11:30 AM
I won a trip to Expo 67 in Montreal selling new subscriptions to the Macomb Daily (MI). What an adventure and a week off school to boot! The chaperone gave the 10 winners spending money & turned us loose each day. We didn't care that we all had to sleep sitting up on the train to Windsor either.

studegary
05-20-2017, 11:31 AM
That's what iPads are for.

I mark up the paper each day as I read it. I don't want to mark up my computer screen. It is also hard to cut something out on a computer screen. I mark up errors and things that I find unusual and/or interesting. Errors tend to jump out at me. I have had it where Cathy asks me about a particular article. When I tell her that I did not read that article, she says, but you marked errors in it. It would be something that I happened to spot without reading the article. The area paper did hire me for awhile to critique the paper. They expected me to comment on articles and find errors in local articles (no news service articles or advertisements). The Editor expected two or three errors per day. I reported on 30 to 35 errors (factual and grammatical) per day. He had meetings with his staff and the number of errors greatly reduced and I lost the job.

jclary
05-20-2017, 11:40 AM
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?20147-Death-of-newspapers&highlight=Newspapers

In the 1920's, it was commercial radio broadcasting which was considered a threat to newspapers.

In the 1950's, television was the next major threat to their survival.

Now with the internet, three strikes, they may be OUT!!

Craig

It is interesting to see the progression (or regression, depending on your point of view) as society, time, and technology intersect. All you need to do is watch the genre of movies from the mid thirties to mid sixties to see how print media figures were elevated, revered, and put on a pedestal. There was a time, where broadcast and print (sort of) equaled in status, and then the visual/broadcast media surpassed. I recall, regarding technology, the term "Mature Technology," being applied to the "horse & buggy" era. Meaning that, since the methods and equipment had remained about the same for decades, that for the most part, no further development was possible. It was so easily obsoleted by the automobile.

Well...we know that is really not true in terms of material development. Modern materials can make a wagon from composites, bearings, harnesses, etc., that would run circles around the wagons of old. But, nonetheless, society has moved on. Just when we think we've seen it all...something else will come along, grab our attention, or blind side us. Seems there is always someone with a dream or vision, to develop the "next best thing."

In terms of communication...anybody care to offer predictions???