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Jeff_H
05-14-2017, 07:32 PM
Last month I acquired a significant cache of old family photo negatives. Among them was this one:

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/Mystery%20car_zpscmxv2tol.jpg

I believe this picture was taken on or near Sept 12, 1953 in Chicago. The woman in the middle with the box is a cousin of my Dad, man in white T shirt is her husband. The woman on the right is one of my aunts. They all traveled from Minnesota to Chicago for a wedding. Taken after dark with a flash bulb. Not sure if this was ever printed, as I have prints from some other pictures from the set but not this one. I had to lighten it up some to see and dust and age marks show up so it looks pretty "dirty".

The hubcap looks like a early postwar Packard but the rear window and rear fender trim does not seem to match any pictures I can find of one. Whatever it is, seems to be a 2 door sedan.

Dad used to talk about this trip. The white T shirt guy, Gene, owned a V12 Lincoln sedan and Dad got to drive it part of the way home from Chicago back to Minnesota. So, not his car and not a Lincoln. Dad always remarked how smoooth that V12 was.

Everyone in this picture is passed on. Cousin with the box died in 2011 at 88, Gene in 1990, and my aunt in 2000.

8E45E
05-14-2017, 07:42 PM
It is a Lincoln.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4185/33853671093_c3317ce929_k.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4163/34278171150_5095fefab2_k.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4173/34501588182_389baee17e_k.jpg

Craig

t walgamuth
05-14-2017, 11:11 PM
Nice looking Lincoln!

klifton1
05-14-2017, 11:15 PM
Skirts don't look right.
Klif

christophe
05-15-2017, 03:41 AM
Skirts don't look right.
Klif

Hi Klif,
Nice to read from you.
I was just thinking the same. Those spats are ugly.
Nice day to all.

Jeff_H
05-15-2017, 10:38 AM
Thanks,

I guess that WAS Gene's car then that my Dad talked about. I always assumed it was a 4dr sedan but guess not. They must have been loading up to head out. I am pretty sure my dad took the photo.

I was thinking the Lincoln could be the one in front of it as I have another view of THAT car from a photo I got from a relative. I super lightened and cropped out those and pasted together here:

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/Wedding%20Car%20collage%201953%20C_zpsunbcww5p.jpg

Looking at pix of late 40s Lincolns, I now realize that is not one. From notes that go with the color picture, I think that car belonged to my Dad's cousin who was the one whose wedding they were at.

More research on that I think its a '49-'52 or so Plymouth or Dodge perhaps.

WinM1895
05-15-2017, 01:05 PM
It is a Lincoln.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4185/33853671093_c3317ce929_k.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4163/34278171150_5095fefab2_k.jpg


1946/48 Lincoln, 1942 Lincoln uses the same body, but has a different grille.

1936/41: These were called Lincoln Zephyr's.

The green mopar pictured in post #6 could be a 1949/50 Chrysler, Dodge, Desoto or Plymouth, because they all used the same body shell.

56H-Y6
05-16-2017, 01:23 PM
Hi

Your mystery car is a 1946 to mid-1947 Lincoln Club Coupe, Model 66H-77. The 1946-mid-1947 model can be identified by the octagonal hubcap centers. a faux hood vent trim and gold 'golf-ball" with two wings hood ornament. The H-Series V-12 that power these Lincolns was basically a extension of the Ford flathead V-8 design. It was smooth and quiet but owing to a relative low bore to stroke ratio, they required higher rpms to create adequate torque. Buyers of upper market cars were used to long stroke/low revving engines as most of the straight eights were, tended to leave the shift in high gear since those engines would accommodate that way of driving, like an automatic transmission before those became widely available. When the Lincoln H-Series V-12 was driven that way, they develop problems with crankcase ventilation and became 'oilers'. The engine also had the inherent problem of overheating as they ran the exhaust passages through the water jacket between the cylinder same as the Ford flathead V-8, which also suffered the same problem. Both engines would develop hot spots in the cylinder walls causing further problems with the rings. The H-Series V-12 wasn't a great engine, many were replaced with Mercury flathead V-8's and in Continentals, the Cadillac and Olds OHV V-8 conversions were popular in the 1950's.

Steve