PDA

View Full Version : 1964 Daytona Hardtop Rescue Effort



r1lark
04-29-2017, 07:23 AM
I've had this car for 30 years, so it's time to get it back on the road. This video was shot two days ago (Thursday), to give y'all a time reference. Lots done to it already, will update later this weekend.

Hope everyone enjoys the video, and will follow along on this project.

Advice and comments are always welcome!

Here is the link to the video, since it doesn't seem to be showing up below: https://youtu.be/zPaF82mxZSs


https://youtu.be/zPaF82mxZSs

nels
04-29-2017, 07:49 AM
Looks like a real solid car and a great color combination. Air conditioning would make that car a great traveling machine.

junior
04-29-2017, 11:11 AM
always thought 4 speeds with bench seats were cool! cheers, junior

r1lark
04-29-2017, 08:39 PM
always thought 4 speeds with bench seats were cool! cheers, junior

The intent was always to convert this car to bucket seats, but maybe the bench should stay. Back in the day, I guess guys that had girlfriends liked the bench seat........;)

spokejr
04-29-2017, 11:20 PM
Cool car, I'm looking forward to any updates you have.

Bill Pressler
04-30-2017, 08:29 AM
Cool car, I'm looking forward to any updates you have.

What he said!

My total Stude dream list would include a '64 GT and a '64 Daytona hardtop.. :)

62champ
04-30-2017, 08:54 AM
always thought 4 speeds with bench seats were cool! cheers, junior

Agreed. This is a friends '64 hardtop with a split bench - rebuilt it the way he would have ordered back in the day - great car to drive. And in speaking with him, he remembers seeing a '64 convertible that had a 259 with a 4 speed...

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/shows/Das%20Awkscht%20Fest%20-%202011/DSC03593.jpg

Skip Lackie
04-30-2017, 09:09 AM
The intent was always to convert this car to bucket seats, but maybe the bench should stay. Back in the day, I guess guys that had girlfriends liked the bench seat........;)

In those days for most of us, "sex" meant a bit of smooching in the car. Bucket seats and floor shifters were definitely an impediment. I have owned a 62 Chevy convertible (with three speed on the column and bench seat) for 55 years that is indication of my skills with women in those days.

r1lark
04-30-2017, 09:12 AM
Wow, pretty!! :)


Agreed. This is a friends '64 hardtop with a split bench - rebuilt it the way he would have ordered back in the day - great car to drive. And in speaking with him, he remembers seeing a '64 convertible that had a 259 with a 4 speed...

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l163/62champ/car/shows/Das%20Awkscht%20Fest%20-%202011/DSC03593.jpg

r1lark
04-30-2017, 08:17 PM
Progress over the last 4 days:
Got the front up on jackstands, and pulled off the front wheels/drums. Had high hopes after pulling the passenger side since the drum and shoes looked great. But the driver’s side – even though the drum turned freely – wouldn’t come off without backing off the adjuster.The drum had some light grooves in it, and the shoe had worn to match. Both drums measured just under 11”, so took the drums to get them turned. Haven’t measured them, but the guys at the shop said they took very little to cleanup. Pulled all the shoes, springs, adjusters, etc off and cleaned up the hardware. Had a new set of front (and rear if I need them) shoes, as well as bearings/races/seals, but didn’t have any wheel cylinders so those are on order.

Pulled off the metal brake lines to the front brakes, these will be replaced along with the hard lines to the rear brakes Of course the brake hoses will be replaced, and I have a set of these already.

Cleaned the grease and dirt from the front suspension components and greased the kingpins, outer pins, and tie rod ends. Everything took grease well, even up to the upper spindle bearings.

Noticed some play in the steering center pin assembly, but also noticed that the bellcrank arm was just shy of rubbing on the exhaust pipe crossover. Looked at the front motor mount insulators and they were squashed quite a bit. Had a new set, so put them in. Easier said than done – I think this was the first time I’ve replaced front mount insulators with the engine still in the car. Believe me, if you are pulling an engine, put new motor mount insulators in while it’s out – it’s a whole lot easier!

Anyway, ready to pull the center pin assembly off tomorrow when I get home from work. Yanked the radiator out (only 4 bolts, already had the hoses off) to make it easier to get to the bellcrank pinch bolt. Need to clean the crud off the crossmember first. I’ve forgotten how easy the ‘64s are to work on,especially when there is no power steering or air conditioning hung on the front of the motor. While the radiator is out, I’ll change the fuel pump with one that I rebuilt with a new “ethanol compatible” kit from Then and Now Automotive.

SN-60
04-30-2017, 09:10 PM
How many miles on the car Paul?

r1lark
05-02-2017, 11:23 AM
How many miles on the car Paul?

Ed, it shows 78,297 but I don't have any way of knowing if that is correct, and if it's 78,000 or 178,000. Knowing that it has gained virtually no miles since the mid-1980s, I might suspect 78,000 but just don't know.

Got the center pin assembly out this morning, got it soaking in degreaser and will take it apart after lunch. Most likely needs a pin new bushings (which I have, but just have to find it).

r1lark
05-02-2017, 08:28 PM
Good day today. Cleaned the crud off the center crossmember, and got the center steering bellcrank out. (Had to make a new tool for pressing these '63-'66 bushings out, since they are a different OD than the '62 and earlier bearings.) Disassembled and cleaned it up, pressed in the new bushings, and set the endplay as close to zero as I could get. Note that these are genuine steel-backed Studebaker bushings, not the soft oiltite bushings (figure I'll get a few points from StudeRich on this :)). By the way, I use an o-ring instead of the cork seal, works a lot better for me. You just have to choose the correct o-ring, then set the bushing down to the correct depth.

My new front wheel cylinders came in the mail today! Will be off again on Thursday, so can reinstall the center pin assembly, and get the front brakes together.

Here are a few pics. The first one is the old motor mount cushions compared to the new ones -- the old ones were really squashed, plus the drivers side had a bolt going all the way thru it! Got plenty of clearance now between the bellcrank and the exhaust crossover. The other pics are of the center pin assembly. Kinda boring pics, but all I have right now.

63871
63872

63873

63874

Noxnabaker
05-03-2017, 04:05 PM
I've seen pictures that are more boring than that... ;)

r1lark
05-06-2017, 02:24 PM
Wow, really slow around here this week. Hard to believe almost everyone went to South Bend!

Here is an update video on the '64 Daytona. Been trying out adding some music to the videos, still have to fine tune the process :).

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to this link to view video #2: https://youtu.be/4MFs_sqlMiE

r1lark
05-12-2017, 10:19 AM
Slow week on the Daytona.

Fuel pump apart, cleaned up, ready to reassemble. Been continuing on the brake system, taking a lot longer than I thought it should. :) In the process of running the new brake lines. The master cylinder I was going to use had a slight 'catch' in it when the primary piston assembly was moved, and disassembly found some small corrosion spots that would not hone out. So, got another master cylinder today.

Having problems finding someone with the proper arbors to turn the rear brake drums. :( Went to a couple of 'old time' shops that I've used before, and they have either upgraded their brake drum lathe and it doesn't have the proper arbors, or they have 'new' personnel that don't understand these older design taper axle hub/drum assemblies. One shop said "Sure, we can do it, I'll just drive the studs out and slap that baby on our brake drum machine". Needless to say, I got out of there quickly.

Pulled the rear axle cover and took a look inside there. I'm no rear axle expert - I've swapped out entire rear axles, but never rebuilt a center section. Noticed something that may or may not be an issue, so sent a video to the Co-Operator Advisor (our own Bob Palma, who hopefully has recovered from his medical emergency at the International Meet) to get his take on it.

Still need to pull the axle shafts out and inspect/grease the wheel bearings and set the end play, as long as there are no issues with the center assembly. Then I can assemble the rear brakes, but can't complete them until I find a place to turn the drums.

Next step will be to change the engine oil and filter, pull the distributor, and put in the 'priming distributor' and circulate some oil to get ready for starting the engine. Oh yeah, and pull the valve covers and make sure I don't have any stuck valves.

Hopefully will have another video soon.

jackb
05-12-2017, 02:40 PM
Your rear brakes provide 30-35% of your braking. Unless you have deep grooves or other rust other damage.... I'd just clean them up with 2 grades of paper, and install after bearing pack.

r1lark
05-14-2017, 08:47 PM
Ok, out of sequence, but I hesitated posting this video since it's sort of a how-to for removing the old front wheel bearing races, installing new races, packing the wheel bearings, and installing the inner bearing and seal. If you haven't wanted to tackle this job on your Studebaker because you weren't sure how to do it, follow along and hopefully you will pick up some tips that will help you. Video is attached at the end of this post, or if you want to go directly to YouTube and watch full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/lp8dMfO8KVA

Yeah, I know my video technique needs some improvement :)........especially a way to 'hang' the camera so it's pointing down at the work being done, to keep me from blocking the view. I'm working on that, or at least trying to come up with an idea.

Most of the brake lines are made up and installed, along with the master cylinder. A roadblock is that I still have not found anyone local to Winston-Salem/Greensboro to turn the rear drums with the tapered hubs installed. Have asked on the NC Chapter Facebook page to see if anyone knows of a shop in NC that can do this. The newer machines apparently have too large an arbor diameter to go thru the hub........and shops that have the older machines with the smaller diameter arbor may not have the proper taper adapters to do this properly and/or personnel that know how to do this properly. GROAN................


EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to this link to view video #3: https://youtu.be/lp8dMfO8KVA

r1lark
06-08-2017, 06:41 AM
Had to clean out the trunk to get to the fuel filler hose, so I can get the gas tank out. Decided to make a short video of what I found in the trunk. Not sure where all of this came from :). Some of it's for this car, but other pieces I'm not sure.

If anyone knows what those Classic Enterprises pieces are for, please let me know.

For full screen capability, go here: https://youtu.be/-LWkc_idRSI

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #4.

r1lark
06-19-2017, 07:18 AM
Getting closer to first start! Fuel system refurbishment is detailed on the video below. Gas tank cleaning/painting, fuel pump rebuild, carb inspection, converting the gas tank sender to a modern float, etc.

Link to the video (so you can watch full screen): https://youtu.be/EGRWBdQfS2w

Comments welcomed.

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #5.

r1lark
06-23-2017, 07:32 AM
Video shows the methods used to prime the oil system, to ensure that the internal components are well oiled prior to first start in 25+ years. Also reviews how to get the engine to the point of #1 cylinders firing so the distributor can be reinstalled and properly indexed.

Comments and questions are always welcomed. And consider subscribing so you don't miss any future videos.

Here is the link, so you can watch full screen: https://youtu.be/N1mkfolZpjQ

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #6.

StudeRich
06-24-2017, 02:58 AM
Great Videos, I watched several and do not remember which one briefly mentioned the Rebuilt Delco Window Distributor and showed it with a New Blue Rotor in it.
It just seemed to say that "this came out of the Daytona", as if it belonged there. :ohmy:

It would be good to note that someone has put a '60 or '61 Lark Distributor in it, as all '62 to '64 Studes. Originally had the Prestolite Distributors.

r1lark
06-24-2017, 05:49 AM
Great Videos, I watched several and do not remember which one briefly mentioned the Rebuilt Delco Window Distributor and showed it with a New Blue Rotor in it.
It just seemed to say that "this came out of the Daytona", as if it belonged there. :ohmy:

It would be good to note that someone has put a '60 or '61 Lark Distributor in it, as all '62 to '64 Studes. Originally had the Prestolite Distributors.

Rich is right on here - someone in the past replaced the original Prestolite with a Delco window distributor. It was in there when I got it, so it will be reused.

jclary
06-24-2017, 08:54 AM
THANKS PAUL!!! It has been a long time since I primed the engine when overhauling the 259 in my Lark. Now that I have another engine on my test stand, I'm at the point of needing to prime it. I have a spare Prestolite distributor laying on the stand right now. I will need to remove the gear & cam, etc. I think for the Lark's engine, I used a straight rod with a tang hammered flat to engage the oil pump. But, thankfully, I have misplaced that crude device. A distributor, as you show, will work with precision.

Your video serves to confirm what I already know, and remind me of what I forgot. In addition to "priming,"and getting the #1 cylinder set, it will aid in positioning the distributor for proper placement to not interfere (throttle linkage, vacuum advance, etc.) with its intended use as a Truck engine. :)

r1lark
06-24-2017, 03:37 PM
John, you are welcome! The whole reason behind these videos is to help folks out that are doing the same thing, plus get comments from more experienced Studebaker folks on better ways to do something. Glad you found it useful.

r1lark
07-11-2017, 11:02 PM
Here is a short video update as of today, July 11. You can use the following link to go to YouTube and watch full screen: https://youtu.be/mrArtjIBKv8 or watch the embedded video at the bottom of this post.

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #7.

Here is a list of the work that has been done to date:
· Oiled cylinders
· Cleaned up and greased front suspension
· Replaced steering bellcrank center pin and bushings (incl o-ring upgrade)
· Replaced front motor mount insulators
· Turned front drums
· Replaced front wheel bearings and seals
· Replaced spindle nut with micro-adjuster kit and readjusted wheel bearings
· Rebuilt front brakes (new shoes, new wheel cylinders, drums turned)
· Rebuilt fuel pump with ethanol-resistant kit
· Replaced rear axle shaft bearing on drivers side, packed bearings, and set end play correctly
· Removed rear axle cover, drained fluid, performed visual inspection, cleaned cover, replaced with new gasket
· Replaced rear axle pinion seal
· Refilled rear axle with 80W-90 gear lube
· Disassembled rear brakes, replaced wheel cylinders with rebuilt set, cleaned shoes/drums, reassembled
· Replaced all three brake hoses
· Replaced all hard brake lines with new
· Replaced master cylinder
· Drained fuel tank
· Blew out fuel line and vacuum checked (passed)
· Installed new stoplight switch on master cylinder
· Bench bled master cylinder, painted, and installed
· Cleaned front seat so wife would sit in it and help with brake bleeding :-)
· Bled all brakes
· Readjusted brakes
· Drained oil
· Removed distributor
· Distributor refurb: removed points/condenser,vacuum advance, centrifugal weights; cleaned & painted; lubricated weights and replaced; verified vacuum advance ok at 15" Hg and replaced; installed new point/condenser set, new rotor, and new cap
· Set up 'priming' distributor using a disassembled Prestolite - replaced gear with a spacer
· Installed new oil filter and added oil to crankcase
· Drained and refilled transmission
· Removed gas tank, cleaned internally with acetone (excellent condition inside); wire-brushed entire outside; converted rust using Pickelex 20; painted with Zinc Cold Galvanizing spray and clearcoated
· Cleaned fuel sender using contact cleaner;checked ohms and was ok; installed new style float; reinstalled into gas tank with new cork gasket
· Removed oil pressure relief and spring, cleaned and polished valve with crocus cloth; reinstalled
· Replaced gas tank
· Made new seal where fuel filler hose goes thru trunk floor
· Replaced fuel line from gas tank to metal fuel line, including new clamps
· Rebuilt Carter fuel pump using 'Now & Then'kit CK-129
· Installed cleanable see-thru filter upstream of fuel pump, using new hoses and clamps
· Cleaned metal fuel line from pump to carb, and recoated
· Removed carb top cover and inspected inside ofcarb - very clean, float free, needle valve free; soaked accelerator pump in neatsfoot oil for 3 days; reinstalled top cover using a new gasket
· Temporarily installed mechanical oil pressure gauge under hood
· Primed oil system using a drill and 90 degree1/2 speed adapter on priming distributor until all rockers were oiling; rotated engine approximately 15 revolutions with oil pressure up
· Removed priming distributor, and installed refurbed Delco window distributor; set to have points just opening at timing mark
· Cleaned and gapped spark plugs
· Installed new set of spark plug wires
· Installed new Felpro rubber gaskets in valve covers, reinstalled, torqued 3 times per Shop Manual
· Oiled cylinders for a second time
· Installed used RobertShaw High Performance 160 degree thermostat and new gasket
· Installed new air filter
· Wire brushed belt grooves in pulleys
· Installed new fan belt and adjusted
· Installed different radiator (used}
· Reinstalled fan
· Installed new top and bottom radiator hoses
· Installed Gabriel 'Classic' gas shocks on rear
· Installed new battery (including proper battery hold down for Bob Palma)
· Installed battery disconnect on negative ground cable
· Installed fuel filter between fuel pump and carb inlet
· Disconnected heater hoses, removed nipples, and installed temporary plugs
· Temporarily wired start/run circuit to ignition switch
· Wired brake lights
· Temporarily installed electric temperature gauge under hood
· Filled cooling system with water, added water pump lubricant, and checked for leaks
· Added non-ethanol gas to tank and checked for leaks
· Vacuumed interior, installed center seat track support, and installed split reclining bench seat

drrotor
07-12-2017, 01:47 AM
Isn't it about time to twist the key?

r1lark
07-12-2017, 05:58 AM
Isn't it about time to twist the key?

Yes - hopefully this morning. :)

sidecar0_0
07-12-2017, 06:12 AM
Have a perfect front seat exactly like yours if interested

r1lark
07-12-2017, 07:48 AM
Have a perfect front seat exactly like yours if interested

Danny, I sent you a PM via this forum.

r1lark
07-12-2017, 12:20 PM
Success!! :) Started right up, good oil pressure, temperature stayed within acceptable range, no odd or worrisome noises except for a very noisy alternator. Got the dwell, idle, and timing set. Hopefully I have a rebuilt alternator in inventory.

Video late tonight!

53k
07-12-2017, 03:28 PM
My wife got a big chuckle from your check list- "Cleaned front seat so wife would sit in it and help with brake bleeding :-)" We have been there and done that and she won't forget the dirty seat.

truckguy
07-12-2017, 08:38 PM
r1lark Yes, those were the days when buckets were a serious disadvantage! :-)

r1lark
07-13-2017, 10:28 AM
Well, we had some video production issues here at TobyFilms. ;)

But, finally got the 'First Start' video pretty much straightened out. Not sure why the text 'pages' that are added seem to lose some of the wording, but we will figure that out.

Here is a link to the 'First Start' video if you want to watch it full screen on YouTube: https://youtu.be/T-_Kdtdtf2c

And here is the embedded video. Remember, comments are always welcome especially corrections, improvements, etc. And consider subscribing to the r1lark YouTube Channel.


https://youtu.be/T-_Kdtdtf2c

r1lark
07-28-2017, 09:09 PM
Been a while since an update, but trust me that work has progressed! The car is running and driving, but that has identified a few issues, the biggest one being the rear axle and u-joint issues. Will try to get a video up soon, but here is an update with some pictures.

The rear axle in the car was a 3.07:1 Model 27. When I replaced the pinion seal, it was obvious that the pinion bearing preload was messed up, because when the yoke nut was retorqued it locked the pinion up. Temporary fix was to loosen the nut until the pinion rotated fairly smoothly :(. Another issue, found while adjusting the brakes, was that one of the axles is bent. Also, one of the u-joints on the current driveshaft is making a noise, and don't want to waste a new u-joint on a driveshaft that will have to be replaced eventually when the rear axle is upgraded. I had always planned on putting a Model 44 axle in at some point, but decided to go ahead and do that now. So, a 3.31:1 ratio Twin Traction rear axle is being readied to put in, the correct length driveshaft with new u-joints, a Super Lark rear sway bar, and new rear springs. Stay tuned for this!

Some of the work since last update...............

Installed six (6) hood bumpers on inner fender edges, adjusted front corner hood bumpers, and adjusted hood latch dovetail
Replaced very noisy later ('65/'66?) alternator with correct rebuilt ALK5001 Prestolite
Lubricated shifter
Cleaned 4-speed shifter tower & coated
Installed shifter tower, shifter boot, and boot retainer
Cleaned and lubricated emergency brake cables
Repaired exhaust leak
Replaced emergency brake pedal assembly (the handle was broken off)
Adjusted emergency brake cable
Installed Ford 6" wheels and almost new tires
Adjusted emergency brake cable
Moved temp gage and oil pressure gage to inside car
Cleaned engine compartment
Removed axles from Model 44 rear axle; one has bad keyway and will be replaced by good spare
Cleaned Model 44 rear axle and primed
Cleaned axles and checked runnout - both are ok
Replaced pinion seal in Model 44 axle, found piece broken out of slinger so replaced with NOS slinger
Installed new inner rear axle seals in Model 44 axle
Installed new wheel bearings on Model 44 axles


Here are a few pictures:

Nasty old noisy alternator and rebuilt alternator (ain't it pretty? :))
65970

New wheels/decent tires. They are 6" Ford Ranger wheels, and the Stude wheelcovers fit them fine. Found four decent '64 wheelcovers and installed also, but you will have to wait until the next video to see them:
6597165972

Original e-brake pedal setup, and replacement:
65973

Model 44 3.31:1 Twin Traction, cleaned and primed, and axles:
65974

Rear axle up on sawhorses inside (because of rain forecast the next couple of days, decided to do pinion seal replacement, axle install, rear cover gasket replacement, and end play adjustment inside). Note home made pinion yoke holder.
65975

Got out the various NOS springs to see what I have that will work in this car. May go with the 1560439 "cop car" (P3) springs but waiting for advice from Jim Pepper before final decision. The cop car spring is the 2nd from bottom:
65976

Finally, I've been looking at what wheels to use. Thinking maybe the more modern Torq-Thrusts as shown in the following picture on the silver car, or maybe vintage style Torq-Thrust D wheels as shown on the black Daytona. Opinions??
6597765978

Corvanti
07-30-2017, 10:08 AM
Great job!!!:!:

IMHO, i'd go with the vintage Torq-Thrusts.

55 56 PREZ 4D
07-30-2017, 02:26 PM
One thing I haven't heard mentioned, when priming the oil system, the pump must be turned counterclockwise.

r1lark
08-06-2017, 08:40 PM
A progress update on the '64 Daytona................

Progress has been slower, since after being off for pretty much 6 weeks, I have had to work the last two weeks :(. The Model 44 rear axle is ready to reinstall. Had to replace one axle shaft with a good used one, due to damage to the keyway. New axle bearings/races, new inner and outer seals, new pinion seal, and of course a new cover gasket. The V8 brakes were transferred over from the Model 27 axle.

Got the old Model 27 rear end and springs out, but do have to replace the rear spring bushings in the frame rails. Still have not decided what springs to use in the back. Leaning towards the 1560439 springs which are heavy duty Wagonaire springs, but are very similar to the Super Lark Full Package rear spring from the standpoint of number of leaves, thicknesses, etc. Has anyone used these springs on a Daytona hardtop?

Dug out the Model 44 spring plates that have the tabs for the rear sway bar, and some of the mounting pieces for the sway bar, to blast and prime/paint.

HELP, NEEDED FOR THIS PROJECT: Looking for a decent '64 or '64 Lark dashboard. A few cracks are ok (ie, does not need to be "show" quality), prefer red but will consider any color. Condition of the gauges and gauge panel is not a deal breaker. Looking for one within reasonable driving distance of North Carolina, since safely packaging one of these dashes for shipping is a bear.

Following are a few pics...............

One of the axles installed, new bearing/race. Had an issue getting this side in, the splines of the Twin Traction unit and the side gear got out of alignment, and had to make a quickie tool to be able to turn the axle while holding the input pinion stationary. You have to overcome the Twin Traction clutches to be able to do this.
66074

Using a bare rear hub to properly locate/center the outer axle seal while tightening the nuts:
66075

Checking rear axle end play:
66076

Backing plates/brakes installed, brake line on, rear axle painted:
66077

Dug out some of the parts for the rear sway bar setup; the spring plates have and extra tab welded to them to mount the sway bar links. Got to get these blasted/primed/painted:
66078

53k
08-06-2017, 10:01 PM
A progress update on the '64 Daytona................

Leaning towards the 1560439 springs which are heavy duty Wagonaire springs, but are very similar to the Super Lark Full Package rear spring from the standpoint of number of leaves, thicknesses, etc. Has anyone used these springs on a Daytona hardtop?
I installed a set of the six-leaf Wagonaire springs on the '64 Daytona convertible I had. They replaced the standard four-leaf springs. In my opinion the six-leafs made a drastic improvement in both ride and handling and they brought the ride height up to where it should have been. I didn't change the front springs, but added Jon Myer's front spring spacers and they leveled the car nicely.

r1lark
08-07-2017, 08:52 AM
I installed a set of the six-leaf Wagonaire springs on the '64 Daytona convertible I had. They replaced the standard four-leaf springs. In my opinion the six-leafs made a drastic improvement in both ride and handling and they brought the ride height up to where it should have been. I didn't change the front springs, but added Jon Myer's front spring spacers and they leveled the car nicely.

Thanks Paul, that's good info.

I did compare the leaf thicknesses and lengths between the p/n 1561277 Super Lark High Perf Package spring and the p/n 1560439 HD station wagon spring, and the results are tabulated below. The springs seem quite close, but the HD station wagon springs have slightly shorter #2 thru #6 leaves, and the #5 leaf is thinner. (Note that I didn't disassemble the springs to get these measurements, and getting the leaf thicknesses was tough on some of the springs - had to shove thin shimstock between the leaves and measure between this.) I'm thinking (hoping:) ) that the HD station wagon spring will be pretty close to the Super Lark springs. If anyone is familiar with spring design and wants to comment, please do!

Here is the table, first column is the Super Lark Full Package spring, and the second column is the HD station wagon spring:
66086

r1lark
10-23-2017, 07:22 PM
Can't believe it's been over 2 months since the last update on the 1964 Daytona rescue. But, while I've been quite lax in updating, rest assured that work has steadily progressed. The car is drivable and insured/licensed now, hurray!

Still have several videos to post, so let's get this thread up-to-date. Following is a short video covering the replacement of the rear spring shackle bushing replacements. These are the bushings in the frame, that a lot of people fuss and cuss about. Follow along as we get some new fresh bushings in there.

If you want to view the video full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/TXa7EErovj8 Not sure why when a YouTube video is embedded on the forum, the viewer is blocked from viewing the video full screen?? Anyone know a way around this?

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #9.

Hope you enjoy it, and comments/questions are welcomed. And subscribe to my YouTube channel if you like these videos!

r1lark
10-24-2017, 01:06 PM
Installing the rear springs and 3.31:1 Twin Traction axle.

Go here if you want to watch the video full screen: https://youtu.be/sL9P_4UDwI8

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #10.

r1lark
10-25-2017, 07:30 AM
Finishing up on the installation of the new HD rear springs, the 3.31:1 ratio Twin Traction Dana 44, and driveshaft. The driveshaft had to change since the Model 44 takes a shorter driveshaft. Looking at the lengths in the Parts Manual, a C-K with auto driveshaft is the right length, and I had one that used the Mechanics type u-joints. Would have preferred Spicer type u-joints, but the 4-speed slip yoke was a Mechanics type, so that's what I had to stay with.

If you want to watch the video full screen, go here:. https://youtu.be/m9fFpG3Xh6k

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #11.

Hope you enjoy the video. Another new one soon!

r1lark
10-26-2017, 01:42 PM
The original wiring harness has some major issues that cannot be properly fixed while still in the car. So.......I've decided to swap in a good wiring harness from a '64 F-body (two door). This video shows the 'disassembled' state.

The next video in a week or so will show the current running/driving status of the car.

If you like to watch the videos full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/C6T3JOsFH04

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #12.

Hope you enjoy this one. As always, comments and suggestions are welcomed, and consider subscribing to my YouTube channel so you don't miss any future videos.

Jessie J.
10-27-2017, 08:46 PM
Love this thread. I also own a '64 Daytona HT, presently in similar condition to what you began with, although mine is Strato-Blue with 259 and 3 speed o/d, original and unmodified, right down to the original 1963 maroon plug wires. Engine runs fine but the brakes are now down from long storage. Been gathering parts for years but of because ongoing business and travel obligations I have been reluctant to disassemble what I might not have time to reassemble. And so it sits.

r1lark
10-27-2017, 10:36 PM
Thanks Jessie, glad you are enjoying this. Obviously I'm not a "videographer", just a redneck with a video camera. :)

New dual exhaust from Parks Pipes will be showing up soon. That single exhaust with the 40 year old Thrush muffler has to go. But it's running and driving! Video update with the current status and a walk around soon.

r1lark
12-08-2017, 06:47 AM
Time to install the new dual exhaust with the 'turbo' mufflers. While the exhaust is out, we will pull the block core ("freeze") plugs and clean the water jackets out.

If you want to watch the video full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/TsSnxNOZq_k

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #13.

StudeRich
12-08-2017, 06:30 PM
Those Blue, button pleated, all vinyl, Split Bench, Reclining Seats are SUPER Rare items. :!:
Shown on Video #12 at 029 to 049 Seconds.

That PATTERN was not used in '64 Daytonas that I know of, it is a '64 Cruiser Pattern also used on the BUCKET Seats of '65 Daytona Sports Sedans, not split bench but I can't think of any other application except '64 Cruiser, that could have used it. :confused:
We know they did not originally come with the Car shown, because it had a Red Interior.

https://youtu.be/C6T3JOsFH04?t=42

r1lark
12-08-2017, 06:49 PM
You have sharp eyes today Rich! :) That seat is in much better shape than the original bench seat, and much more comfortable. Current plan is to have it reupholstered, along with the back seat, in an original-style '64 Daytona pattern in red vinyl.

I have a NOS '64 red cloth/vinyl bucket seat interior for it, but not sure I want to convert the car to bucket seats.

StudeRich
12-08-2017, 07:03 PM
So Paul, did you part out a '64 Cruiser?

r1lark
12-08-2017, 07:14 PM
So Paul, did you part out a '64 Cruiser?

No, I bought that seat at the York PA swap meet about 15 years ago.

studegary
12-08-2017, 10:35 PM
You have sharp eyes today Rich! :) That seat is in much better shape than the original bench seat, and much more comfortable. Current plan is to have it reupholstered, along with the back seat, in an original-style '64 Daytona pattern in red vinyl.

I have a NOS '64 red cloth/vinyl bucket seat interior for it, but not sure I want to convert the car to bucket seats.

The seats look good. How about changing the door panels and dash to blue?

r1lark
12-09-2017, 03:22 PM
The split/reclining seat upholstery is just "ok", but I don't have a rear seat to match it.

r1lark
12-09-2017, 04:07 PM
One step forward, then two large steps backwards. :(

While I was working on the new exhaust, I found that the threads on the exhaust manifold studs were in very poor shape - bad enough that on one stud, the nut would no longer tighten up. So, started soaking the studs with my favorite spray (Sili-Kroil), plus heated the heck out of the studs and manifold. Got the first one moving back and forth a little, so just kept working it back and forth and spraying it. But no luck, it snapped off. I hate drilling out broken exhaust studs laying under the car :mad:.

So, this video is showing pulling the engine out of the '64 Daytona to fix the broken exhaust manifold studs, replace the front and rear seals, clean the water jackets, replace the valve seals, and paint the engine. It would have had to come out soon or later........so it ended up being sooner. With no power anything, and a manual transmission, it's actually pretty easy to pull.

If you want to watch the video full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/PVS8ASlDYtc


https://youtu.be/PVS8ASlDYtc

Noxnabaker
12-09-2017, 04:53 PM
I had to go to youtube to se it full screen, wanna see this good!
& I'm happy to see someone else, like me, who's also working alone without a fancy workshop & such... ;)

r1lark
12-10-2017, 05:14 PM
Nox, I have a workshop per se, but it's filled up with other Studebaker projects! But, I do like working outside - I actually prefer it. But when it snows, or rains, or is only 20 degrees F out, that kinda slows down the work. Like Friday & Saturday, in this pic:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/2LZZ55kLcV5MFWae_V-r-WvUnqyE0MndvrcoOHlrrB0gxv6i0IW4-Z_giMkOKVEZ3UsOZkhAvfZJ8zA-AX81chw5MYvq5iRUt992RF3KASlT38LRcT5FFAjoUKsf35_xYnK1gNDiGq7n6qN-Grwwt-2FMy2Wf_95r62P_kEgDQ8mQxC57dnme7mpewSwQD7vFvQuh5C7dVwwqC4OOMRdeQkoogSwhbclc_gPyl tQvF_9-GwhO-hqtf98-_Ez8y5_OS3QC8Oigi6Zl4s3Qqxu6zh5ufot9myE7TzttfUzNddzV5hY--LVdaeV8yqCfsWopjJn4wuOOn17f7aWwfqmaSH8X8-gEIQ6WqWqS3mvV_XYbdQeZ1eonRfre4wMN0FBW_XDhwd4gJPdL0oXr3bwztNR3Ii_5mjTqNbjF_AsLPH GPKkukp-HSIIiN6Q0-xG5OF2VYthy7aat_VzOl859HbfDmmMW9HX0N_2i3T1ashBYTtznhMn78Q9AE4cpSSuM5rnZQEN3w73FM cBhEOBd77jNlbTKrf75-Opva73l63yovMtmpSyVFxrQVjphPdkE_tYB-ONbVJ_5wTjUW7A01HX9LOy7IUjEwtll9zw2lLTSImolt0BdGuj9mjEpoiQLCPYxwTw468DUrvyzjW5B9 LdOltj3zSPPP6I=w838-h628-no

r1lark
12-10-2017, 08:14 PM
Really short video of engine on stand, and getting some parts off of it.

If you want to watch full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/uizHSah4C-c

EDIT: The embedded video has been removed so this thread will load quicker. Please go to the link posted just above to view video #15.

r1lark
12-31-2017, 07:35 AM
Happy New Year! With the Christmas Holidays finishing up, we are moving forward again on the engine from the '64 Daytona. There will be several videos in quick succession as we get the engine ready to reinstall.

This video shows the prep of the aluminum filler block, the installation of the oil filter adapter, and one method for putting a curvature in the front & rear cork pieces for the oil pan.

If you want to watch the video full screen, go here: https://youtu.be/8ep_0awx2r0


https://youtu.be/8ep_0awx2r0

r1lark
12-31-2017, 10:04 PM
OK, I have removed most of the embedded videos. Each one still has a link that takes you directly to the video on my YouTube channel. I got tired of the thread taking sooooooo long to load -- so figured if I was tired of it, everyone else probably has just given up looking at it. :(

Hope this makes it easier for everyone.

r1lark
01-01-2018, 06:31 PM
Happy New Year's Day!

And a happy New Year's afternoon for me, because the oil pan is finally on the engine (proof below at end of post :!: ). I'm not afraid to say that this was the most FRUSTRATING oil pan installation on a Stude V8 ever - at least for me. I don't know why, but had more trouble with the rear cap cork seal than I ever have had. It's a fairly new Felpro oil pan gasket set, and the length of the cork seal was the same as a NOS gasket set I have. But the width of the seal was too wide to fit into the groove in the rear main bearing cap. The 'side' that went into the groove was driven by the slight angles on the two ends of the cork seal. Tried for 45 minutes to get it in, using a thin putty knife. Finally turned it 90 degrees, re-cut the angles in the two ends, and it went right in place. I was within a minute or two of giving up and starting over, if the truth be known.

Interestingly, the NOS cork piece I have is square, but this Felpro piece was at least 3/32" (maybe 1/8") wider in one direction.

But it's in, and the seals are properly compressed (can tell by the Permatex #2 squeezing out). Bolts are snug+, and will let it sit until after supper and then torque the bolts.

I have never done this with the engine in the car, and for sure will never ever attempt that. :)

Picture proof (and video in a few days - there is a backlog of those due to the holidays):
69455

r1lark
01-01-2018, 09:41 PM
Trying to get caught up on videos. Here is a video of replacing the rear main seal. Included in a comparison of the current Felpro rear main seal versus one from about 10 years ago.

Here is the link https://youtu.be/IwOBQ6F4Yg4 to the video on my YouTube channel.

I'm trying not to embed too many of the videos since it causes the thread to load so slow..................

r1lark
01-02-2018, 06:12 PM
Another video - this one shows a lot of the parts and pieces for engine assembly, as well as finishing up the rear seal installation.

Here is the direct link to the video on my YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/Zh349X-Drt4

69478

Stude Shoo-wop!
01-02-2018, 06:40 PM
Wow! A 64 Daytona is one Studebaker model you rarely see in a private collection, let alone as a project (with the intent of getting it out and about)! I commend you for putting this much effort into this Stude, r1lark. May happy times be had!

r1lark
01-03-2018, 02:27 PM
Thanks Jake. I enjoy working on them, but even more enjoy driving them. Plan is to take a trip in this one later in the spring to Arizona -- roadtrip! :)

Thanks for following this thread.

r1lark
01-05-2018, 08:35 AM
Next video - checking the crankshaft end play (axial thrust clearance), camshaft end play, and the camshaft gear lash. Follow along and see an example of how this is done using just a magnetic base and dial indicator.

Click on this link to go to the video: https://youtu.be/AMCdHvOsqTY

Thanks to all of those who have been following along.

Noxnabaker
01-05-2018, 04:17 PM
Yep, following we are... :)
Looks a bit like lining up a ships engine, only different size.

r1lark
01-06-2018, 12:58 PM
Next "Studebaker Rescue - 1964 Daytona" video is out -- setting the crankshaft end play. Removing the cam & gear, removing the crankshaft gear, shim removal, and putting it all back together. Included is an important note about the camshaft thrust plate bolts/washers.

Use this link to access the video on my channel on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Fz8V3k650AI

And, if you subscribe to my YouTube channel, you will get notifications each time a new video is published. Unlike the "big" guys like Roadkill, I don't make any money off these videos for two reasons. First, I don't have enough subscribers (would need about 1000 times as many to even think about it :) ). Second, the advertisements are turned off so y'all aren't bothered by them.

Thanks for watching, and please comment if you see something that is not right, or if you have a better way, or if you don't like them........or even if you do like them.

r1lark
01-07-2018, 01:54 PM
Next video is up - replacing the valve stem (or guide) seals on the 'Studebaker Rescue' 1964 Daytona. Note that we did these without removing the rocker stands and rocker shafts. The video shows how.

Link to Video #21 on YouTube: https://youtu.be/24tLmAC9mw4

Enjoy, and please post comments and/or questions.

SScopelli
01-07-2018, 02:26 PM
The valve seals you were using, did they fit snug on the valve guide? Seems these would be nice for more positive seal if they dont just ride up and down with the valve and no special machining of the guide to get others to work..

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=69583&d=1515352944
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=69581&d=1515352944
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=69582&d=1515352944


695816958269583

r1lark
01-07-2018, 03:36 PM
No, they are still umbrella seals that fit around the valve stem. Supposedly they are the next step up as far as material, from the black 'stock' umbrella seals. The best umbrella seal would probably be the blue-colored Viton seals that Phil Harris sells. I'm using those on my '62 GT engine, but it's a rebuild as opposed to this 'reseal'.

I know that valve seals can be a controversial subject - umbrella versus positive seal, no machining of the guide versus machining, etc. Kinda like what oil filter is better :). I use the umbrella-type seals in a stock engine.

r1lark
01-27-2018, 05:34 PM
Oil pan installation, part one. Broke it up into two shorter videos.

I have never done this with the engine in the car, and honestly I don't think I'd attempt it except in an emergency. :ohmy:

Here is a link to the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/E-QkiHLFvAU

r1lark
01-28-2018, 03:09 PM
Finishing up the oil pan installation (whew, thank goodness :)) and starting on the front cover.

Link to video on my YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/cZP2KqWpytw

StudeRich
01-28-2018, 06:14 PM
Paul, were you able to purchase those Special Silicone Valve Seals at your FLAPS?

r1lark
01-28-2018, 07:52 PM
Rich, I ordered them from rockauto.com

I didn't check to see if they were available locally.

r1lark
02-02-2018, 12:25 PM
Front cover is on, and the engine is painted!

Here is the link to the video of finishing up the front cover and getting ready for paint: https://youtu.be/wVcsHGeW4kc

And here are some pictures of painting it -- on the only semi-warm day in weeks!

Priming the engine and bellhousing:
7017670177

Painting done:
701787017970180

Noxnabaker
02-02-2018, 12:31 PM
Good color to hide oil-leaks... ;)

r1lark
02-06-2018, 06:51 PM
Time to get the 4 speed apart and freshen it up. Two issues - the shift from first to second is pretty bad, especially when cold. Also, it really noisy in reverse. So, let's get it broken down -- here is a link to part 1 of the disassembly: https://youtu.be/G6FZYnpnc8c

And to all of those who subscribed to my YouTube channel and so have already gotten to view this video -- THANKS!!

r1lark
02-08-2018, 03:15 PM
Part II of the Studebaker Rescue T-10 4-speed disassembly. In this video, we finish the initial disassembly: https://youtu.be/Tpou7PezTw8

Now it's time to get started on disassembly of the smaller assemblies, and cleaning & inspection of each part.

Enjoy, and please comment with advice and questions.

r1lark
02-09-2018, 06:18 PM
Finally had an off-day and a good weather day coincide today! :)

The morning was taken up by a couple of doctors appointments (routine physical, and picked up a new CPAP machine). This afternoon, got the valves covers stripped, primed, and painted. Also got the bellhousing plate cleaned up and painted. Below is a picture, but it was starting to get dark so the color doesn't look quite right on the valve covers, but in the sunlight the color is right on the money and glossy.

Was hoping to get the engine back in the car tomorrow, but it's supposed to start raining -- and rain into at least the middle of next week -- ugh. :( Still have to adjust the valves, and get the distributor in and set, and hopefully get the starter cleaned up/painted and bolted on before I stick the engine back in.

Here's the pic of this afternoon's work:
70301

r1lark
02-24-2018, 11:50 AM
Got the 1964 Daytona starter 'tuned up', here is Part 1 of the video.

Can anyone point out what is unusual about this starter? Anyone who gets this right will receive a free subscription to my YouTube channel! ;)

Be sure to comment and/or provide advice!

Link to the video on my YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/WQTv5b6ahJg

70590

studegary
02-24-2018, 11:54 AM
I haven't watched the entire video yet. At the beginning it appeared to have four field coils.

r1lark
02-25-2018, 05:06 PM
Gary, it's true that it does have four field coils, but that's not the unusual thing I had in mind.

But you are sorta on the right track. :)

r1lark
02-25-2018, 05:15 PM
Got the engine back in the car..........video to follow in a few days. Got to get all the little pieces back on, and of course get the T10 back together.

Here is a sneak peak:

70648

r1lark
02-26-2018, 07:33 PM
Here is a link to the Starter Tune-up Part 2 video: https://youtu.be/9bB3CtskrzE

Final installment in a day or two. Trying to break the videos up into smaller 'chunks' that don't take so long to watch.

Tomorrow will be a break in the rain here in North Carolina -- sunny and mid-60s temperature -- so I'll get everything hooked up on the engine and hopefully get started back installing the dual exhaust.

r1lark
02-28-2018, 09:15 PM
Finally here is the last video on the Starter Tune-up. Too many videos on such a minor item, future videos will need to be cut down on detail or I need to talk faster or both. :)

Here is the link to the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/DTqLEtskY7k

70715

70Avanti2
03-01-2018, 07:18 PM
like your vids. esp starter and trans. I would like more detail on how to not less

r1lark
03-02-2018, 07:41 AM
like your vids. esp starter and trans. I would like more detail on how to not less

Thanks for the input David.

r1lark
03-02-2018, 07:45 AM
Here is a fairly quick video on prepping the engine to go back into the car. Enjoy, and please comment and/or provide advice.

Link to video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/CeL4ap2rF_M

70720

Noxnabaker
03-02-2018, 05:46 PM
Neat!
:)

(My Mopar engine's got a separate shaft with the oildrive under the distrubuter shaft & with those out I've just made a long shaft that fits in the slot.)

70Avanti2
03-02-2018, 06:33 PM
I have ground down the end of long piece of rebar or all tread to prime the oiling system. But you use what you got.

r1lark
03-02-2018, 06:58 PM
Neat!
:)

(My Mopar engine's got a separate shaft with the oildrive under the distrubuter shaft & with those out I've just made a long shaft that fits in the slot.)


I have ground down the end of long piece of rebar or all tread to prime the oiling system. But you use what you got.

There are a lot of different ways to skin a cat. :)

I enjoy making special 'tools' for working on old cars. Just because Studebaker (or Kent-Moore) made a special tool one way doesn't mean there aren't five other ways to do it.

Noxnabaker
03-03-2018, 04:35 AM
Yep! & I always find it interesting to see how others do it, I like your idea. :)

r1lark
03-24-2018, 02:56 PM
Well, no videos lately since I have been having 'technical difficulties'. :( Anyone using an easy-to-learn video editor that can speed up sections of a video, and easily add music to sections? If so, please let me know what it is.

Finally got the exhaust system all mocked up, but before I install it with gaskets and clamps, we have to make sure the rear sway bar setup will fit and not interfere with the exhaust. On my '63 R1 Daytona hardtop, the rear tailpipes come very close to the pipes. I think I tweaked the exhaust system for the '64 enough to provide some extra clearance, but want to make sure. All the parts for the swaybar setup have already been cleaned up and painted, but I did not have the 'adapter' plates that are used on the Larks. Back in the '80s when we were collecting rear sway bar setups, most of them came from under '57 President Classics and Packards. These didn't use the adapter plates like the Larks, so I've had to whip up 'reproductions' of these. Not hard, if you have the right size flat bar.

Following are some pics of the swaybar setup:

Swaybar from a '57 President Classic before cleaning and painting:
71273

Here are the links, metal sleeves for the link bushings, and the special washers blasted and ready for priming:
71280

Original adapter plate sample, the pieces of flatbar that will be drilled/tapped, and the dimensional locations of the holes:
71274

Drilling the holes in both plates to save time:
71275

Tapping the holes:
71276

Adapter plates finished, including chamfering the holes, ready for paint:
71277

Adapter plates painted, and hanging up to dry (with the sway bar and links which were previously painted):
71278

Small parts, bushings, bolts, etc ready to go:
71279

Since the car is outside on jackstands, as soon as the rain and snow stops (maybe Monday) I'll get the swaybar installed. For those who wonder where the special spring U-bolt plates are that have the extra 'ear' for the swaybar links to attach to.........those are already on the car.

More to follow.

r1lark
03-28-2018, 09:33 PM
Getting the engine back into the 'Studebaker Rescue' 1964 Daytona hardtop. This video was shot quite a while back, but technical issues with the video editing had to be resolved (in other words, find a video editor that some fat old guy could use that didn't take months to learn). This is my first video with music, and the first with fast forwarding in certain boring sections. Enjoy, and please comment.......and share with your friends.

In the meantime, we have been working on the exhaust and the 4-speed rebuild. Video to follow on the 4-speed.

Remember, this is my first experiment with music, and in some of the sections the music is too loud in comparison to the talking. Hopefully I'll improve in future videos, but if you have any advice please comment.

Here is the link to the video on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/wr_1OZrgmUc

71419

Noxnabaker
03-29-2018, 03:57 PM
Nice one!
I know the feeling of bad ground, I'm in a dirty-dusty-earth-floor barn, put'n plates under any & all stuff with small wheels... & you do NOT wanna drop a oily washer so ofcourse I do.

r1lark
03-29-2018, 07:21 PM
Nice one!
I know the feeling of bad ground, I'm in a dirty-dusty-earth-floor barn, put'n plates under any & all stuff with small wheels... & you do NOT wanna drop a oily washer so ofcourse I do.

Nox, I do enjoy working outside on a car, but sometimes there are side effects for sure! :) Climbing under, out from under, and under a car again and doing that about 50 times a day does keep you young however. I've threatened to get a 4-post lift, but my garage is not quite tall enough. when I built it, I put it on three rows (high) of concrete block, but it needs another two or 3 rows to raise the building up. That wouldn't be too awful hard, but to jack the building up I would have to take everything off the shelves and everything out from the rafters - that would be the hard part.

Glad you are watching the videos - thanks!

r1lark
05-19-2018, 09:08 AM
After a couple of weeks in Arizona, plus working quite a bit (more than I really want to :)), we can get back to videos. There is enough film for several videos.

Here is the first one, the final disassembly steps on the T-10 tranny. Stay tuned for more.

Link: https://youtu.be/Z0EXtLNZ8Cs

72594

r1lark
05-26-2018, 09:01 AM
Here is a video covering the repairs to the BW T-10 4 speed rear extension housing -- repairing the shifter bolt threads by installing inserts; removing the old rear bushing; and installing the new rear bushing and seal.

Link to video: https://youtu.be/OHbh_MwfvkE

72750

r1lark
05-27-2018, 07:59 AM
Here is a quick video that shows the parts (both original cleaned & inspected, as well as the new/NOS parts) ready for reassembly.

Link to video: https://youtu.be/IIH-vXdEl8Q

As you can expect, there is a time gap between getting things done and then putting the videos together. We have had so much rain lately that painting the transmission has not been possible (since I need to paint outside to keep fumes from drifting upstairs into our living area). Hopefully either this afternoon or tomorrow (Memorial Day) I can get it painted.

72770

r1lark
05-28-2018, 08:40 AM
The weather held off enough to get the T-10 primed and painted yesterday afternoon. Pics are below. Today's tasks will be to get the shifter arms & side cover installed, clean up the shifter, replace the shifter handle with the NOS one, and get it bolted (temporarily) to the transmission to adjust the shift rods.

Next video this evening, it's uploading to YouTube now -- Part I of the reassembly.

Enjoy the pics......
72788

72789

StoneDog
05-28-2018, 11:32 AM
I've been watching - and commenting occasionally - on YouTube. Man, you do good work! Thanks for all the pics and vids. Really amazing to see something like this come together over time. Wish I had the mechanical skill and knowledge you have. Keep up the good work!

Noxnabaker
05-28-2018, 03:56 PM
I was baffeled by the light blue primer & thought it would've been real naughty-cool with that color on engine & gearbox...
But that's me. ;)
(I'm also a bit into "gearboxing" now; I need to find out how the 4 wires should be connected from the overdrive, it's a MoPar A500.)
& by the way, can't hold it secret anymore: Josephine passed the test & swallows the miles now!
:)

r1lark
05-28-2018, 05:02 PM
Thanks StoneDog! I haven't had as much time to work on it as had hoped. Best laid plans and all that. :) Sometimes I wonder if anyone is really watching these videos, so we do appreciate the comments! By the way StoneDog, I've noticed thru some of your posts that it seems you have been looking to buy a Studebaker (or another Studebaker). Have you gotten one yet?

Nox, the primer is actually light grey but looking at the picture again does seem to have a blue tint. Glad you have Josephine back on the road! Send Jeff Rice some more pics and info to post on the Studebaker Racing site -- we have noticed that we haven't seen any updates lately.

r1lark
05-28-2018, 07:25 PM
Here is the first (finally) reassembly video for the Studebaker Rescue '64 Daytona hardtop's T-10 4 speed. This one deals with reassembly of the mainshaft - installing the gears, synchros, bearing, bearing retainer, and speedo gear.

We welcome comments - please leave them on the YouTube page, or here.

Link to video: https://youtu.be/ph_--9SaU3w

72803

Noxnabaker
05-29-2018, 04:43 PM
Okidoki Paul, many things happening now, I thought I did send Jeff mail...
Thanx for reminding me!
:)

r1lark
06-01-2018, 05:31 PM
The next step in the reassembly of the T-10 4 speed is to install the main cluster and input shaft into the main case. Follow along as we complete this important step in the reassembly.

As always, comments are welcomed and encouraged. If you know of better ways to perform these steps, or if you spot something that is not correct, please comment.

Here is the link to the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/TavYFWAUYAw

72894

StoneDog
06-01-2018, 11:28 PM
No, I haven't found one yet. I'm looking for an automatic so that narrows down the options available to me. I'd be looking for a "turn-key" car needing no major work on it, which narrows the options further. It's a matter of time, something will turn up eventually! :)

r1lark
06-08-2018, 08:59 PM
Transmission is finally back in the car. I did find out that I can no longer bench press a T-10 4-speed while laying under the car on my back, actually had to get my neighbor to help me lift it up and slide it onto the lineup (headless) bolts. :(

Here is a pic of the tranny on the bench, assembled with the shifter on to get the shift rods adjusted:

73094

StoneDog
06-08-2018, 11:59 PM
Looking good, man! :)

Noxnabaker
06-09-2018, 04:42 PM
That shifter stick looks a bit like the ones used original in 60-61 Valiants (-62 had column shift), I understand now that I never seen a original Studebaker floorshift before.
& yes: it sure looks good!

r1lark
06-09-2018, 06:26 PM
Thanks guys! Sometimes I wonder why I make the effort to make them pretty, since no one will see it unless they get under the car.

But, I do enjoy the effort. Despite the fact that I skinned/chipped up the pretty paint trying to get it in by myself. But being the anal person I am, it's touched up now. :rolleyes:

Nox, that shifter is for use in a car with a bench seat, which is the way this Daytona was originally built. Right now it has split reclining bench seat in it, but it may end up with bucket seats in which case the shifter stick will be changed to a straight one.Thanks guys! Sometimes I wonder why I make the effort to make them pretty, since no one will see it unless they get under the car.

The transmission is all hooked up, shifter in, shift rods on, speedo cable hooked up, driveshaft in, and the Red Line fluid in it. And, got one side of the exhaust on the car before it started thundering and lightening.

ratfink396
06-09-2018, 08:34 PM
I just got done putting a '63 T-10 into my '60 Lark; I used a competition plus Hurst & have issues with the shift rods & speedo cable - now I see why! Those rods! Going to investigate an offset adapter or a right angle one hopefully...
Transmission is finally back in the car. I did find out that I can no longer bench press a T-10 4-speed while laying under the car on my back, actually had to get my neighbor to help me lift it up and slide it onto the lineup (headless) bolts. :(

Here is a pic of the tranny on the bench, assembled with the shifter on to get the shift rods adjusted:

73094

Noxnabaker
06-10-2018, 05:43 PM
Yes, I know the shifter is for bench seat, that's why it's bended the way it is, I'm a bit of a "old-time-shift-nerd" & wanna have a Hurst in Josephine because of memories of them... (There was a G.T. Hawk at the (big Swedish Studebaker-) meeting just this weekend with a Hurst & I wanted to take a picture of it but forgot.)
& as for painting where nobody can see it; I paint everything I've been at even under Josephine, & later on I hope to do the whole underside, but so far it's only the welded places & master brake cylinder & such that's red.
Keep on, it's inspiring!

r1lark
06-18-2018, 08:56 PM
A short 4 minute video before we get the Studebaker Rescue 1964 Daytona down off the jackstands. Follow along as we crawl under the car and look at what has been done underneath, and take a quick look under the hood.

The last installments of the 4-speed assembly will be out soon, so stay tuned.

Keep your fingers crossed that the car starts right up and runs well after all this work........and that the T-10 shifts smoothly with no noise!!

Here is the link to the video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ZSvugSFf-Rg
Please share with your friends, and please comment!

Following is before and after pictures of under the hood:
73313

70Avanti2
06-18-2018, 09:28 PM
Above the rear axle diff. did I see a bracket for a rubber stop?

r1lark
06-18-2018, 09:50 PM
Above the rear axle diff. did I see a bracket for a rubber stop?

I was wondering if anyone would notice that missing :). Got to place an order with SI tomorrow, and that's one of the items.

studegary
06-18-2018, 11:38 PM
With such a good engine compartment restoration, how about getting a correct radiator cap for it? That is first thing that I noticed in the underhood picture and I would take an authenticity point off for that :).

r1lark
06-19-2018, 10:50 AM
Well, we will say it's a later model Avanti cap :D.

Seriously, as mentioned in the video, this is not a 'restoration'. The plans are to drive this car to Arizona from North Carolina on a "road trip adventure" so certain things are being upgraded. The radiator cap is one, the stainless worm drive hose clamps are another. And there will also be an aluminum radiator and a small unobtrusive front air dam, so don't look at any of those pictures once they get installed! :woot:

The car also has (horrors) radial tires and Ford Ranger wheels!!

studegary
06-19-2018, 12:43 PM
Well, we will say it's a later model Avanti cap :D.

Seriously, as mentioned in the video, this is not a 'restoration'. The plans are to drive this car to Arizona from North Carolina on a "road trip adventure" so certain things are being upgraded. The radiator cap is one, the stainless worm drive hose clamps are another. And there will also be an aluminum radiator and a small unobtrusive front air dam, so don't look at any of those pictures once they get installed! :woot:

The car also has (horrors) radial tires and Ford Ranger wheels!!

Yes, I understand all of that and appreciate your effort. However, the "later model Avanti cap" will not fly.

Noxnabaker
06-19-2018, 04:09 PM
I think it's really neat!
"Not the best video" depends on what you're comparing with, I was able to see it all, even the swaybar.
I bet it'll be nice to start driving soon, right?
:D
(Josephine has being grumpy lately by overheating as soon as we're in city-trafic, this evening after work I removed the thermostat & wired up a manual switch for the electric fan...)

r1lark
06-20-2018, 09:38 PM
Thanks Nox. I actually did drive it on Tuesday!

It started right up after filling the fuel bowl thru the vent tube. The timing needed a little adjustment, but the idle mixture and the dwell was right on. After going thru the heating and cooling sequence to cure the VHT coating on the exhaust, it was time to drive. Thank goodness the T-10 shifted great! Just a little chatter out of the clutch starting off in first gear, but I think that will go away since it wasn't doing that before. The handling is great, hopefully will be even better when the new front coil springs go in.

Last night I started on the bodywork. First area is the passenger side rear wheelwell, in front of the wheel. A relatively small hole that needs repair. Spent about an hour on it cleaning off the undercoating and developing a plan of action. This should not be too complicated to repair. Below is a picture of the area, just below. Note the factory paint that is still on the metal, it was protected by the undercoating. Will post more pics later this week of the repair. After that is done, it will be time to pull the drivers side door and rear quarter off to replace the forward inner rear quarter panel (the panel that has the 'rear' door post, where the lock plate is).

73364

More to follow...................

studegary
06-20-2018, 09:44 PM
Why pull the door off. It seems to me that this is just asking for extra work.

r1lark
06-21-2018, 06:50 PM
Why pull the door off. It seems to me that this is just asking for extra work.

Because the drivers side door is as lumpy as a sack of potatoes and the hinges are terrible! It will be replaced with a NOS door and NOS hinges.

studegary
06-21-2018, 10:34 PM
Because the drivers side door is as lumpy as a sack of potatoes and the hinges are terrible! It will be replaced with a NOS door and NOS hinges.

Thanks! That makes sense. From your post, I got the idea that you were pulling the door relative to the rust repair.

Noxnabaker
06-22-2018, 03:50 AM
Congratulations! Not that I would wanna have a 60's Studebaker rather than a 50's but for the rest!!! :)
(I used to have rust in all 4 corners of the floor/walls; cut-&-weld cured that fast.)

r1lark
06-22-2018, 07:36 AM
Thanks! That makes sense. From your post, I got the idea that you were pulling the door relative to the rust repair.

The rust I'm starting on is on the passenger side, but that's pretty much it on that side. But the drivers door and outer rear quarter and the front portion of the inner rear quarter will be replaced with NOS stuff.

r1lark
07-06-2018, 08:24 PM
Got a chance to work on the rust repair this week. Love working in 95 degree weather and what feels like 90% humidity :(

See picture in post #121 showing the starting point.

Anyway, got everything cut out..........and of course had to cut further than originally thought to get to good solid metal. So much for "take a flat piece of sheetmetal, form it on the sandbag, and weld it in". The first piece was a fairly complicated 90 degree piece, with an added formed/curved area that forms the seal between the inner rear quarter and the outer rear quarter. The second piece was easier, but still needed a c-shaped flange formed.

Unfortunately it looks like I didn't take a picture of the first piece before welding it in, but you should be able to get a good idea of what it looks like from the pictures. I like to use plug welds to attach pieces like this, but had a lot of trouble plug welding to the floor pan........my fault since I should have done a some grinding of the weld areas after sandblasting, and also because I naively believed the wonderful weld-thru primer that was $20 a can could actually be welded thru. So the welds to the floor look kinda ugly but they are solid welds.

Double click the pictures to bring up larger ones.

Still cutting, with the hole getting larger each time:
73641

I use CAD to design the repair pieces: Cardboard Aided Design :):
73642

First section, installed, shown from inside the wheelwell:
73643

Another pic, from inside showing the rest of the first section:
73644

Second section, ready to weld in with holes for plug welds and weld thru primer on the places that can't be reached for paint after installing:
73645

Final fit up of the second section, mainly to mark the plug weld 'underneath' locations so the "weld thru" primer can be removed in those areas.
73646

Tomorrow is supposed to be a nice day, so we will get this welded in, clean up the weld thru primer overspray and coat inside and out with self-etching primer, and get some paint on the sections. Then some seam sealer, and undercoating on the outside. And some POR-15 on some floor areas around the repaired areas.

Anyone know of a modern undercoating product that matches the look of the thick factory asphalt undercoating? I've been using 3M but it's no where as thick.......so you can definitely tell where the original undercoating ends and the 3M starts.

Also this weekend, get the passenger side rear quarter window and regulator out, clean/paint, replace the window rollers and cat whiskers, reinstall, and get the window working smoothly. Then it's time to move to the drivers side for major work (new door, new outer rear quarter panel, and new inner rear quarter (forward section that has the door lock post).

Noxnabaker
07-07-2018, 04:24 AM
Cool! :)
(A wee bit much overlap for my taste, but on the other hand I don't overlap at all & now that I did put louvers on the hood I got almost a millimeter gap on one whole side on one of them to fill... & when people ask me to weld their stuff in this manner & they say they don't mind overlap & I figure it's their car & still only do about one mill that mostly melts into the weld anyway, just can't help it.)

r1lark
07-07-2018, 05:57 AM
Nox, unfortunately my welding skills are mediocre at best, so I'll tend to use butt welds only where the repair will show.

Inside the car, the new pieces will be hidden by the seat so they were overlapped (in some areas flanged). Not sure I would have ever gotten the more complicated section to fit correctly with consistent gaps everywhere if I had tried to butt weld that one.

jclary
07-07-2018, 08:18 AM
Nox, unfortunately my welding skills are mediocre at best, so I'll tend to use butt welds only where the repair will show.

Inside the car, the new pieces will be hidden by the seat so they were overlapped (in some areas flanged). Not sure I would have ever gotten the more complicated section to fit correctly with consistent gaps everywhere if I had tried to butt weld that one.

Paul, allow me to offer a wee bit of encouragement. First, I must confess that I have not taken the time to read all your progress on this project. Attempting to be a caregiver to my 97-year-old mother and finally paying enough attention to my wife's health (she works so hard to care for others to the risk of her own health), has kept me from spending as much time monitoring the forum as I once did.

Regarding butt-welds vs overlap welds...done properly, I think both methods are acceptable. In either case, once the task is completed, key to success is to get the repair sealed away from oxygen exposure. Working in industrial sales over the years, I was often tasked to develop, innovate, and engineer custom systems to solve specific problems in order to gain success in a very competitive environment. Having exposure to such a variety of work-related challenges and my auto hobby worked very well for the benefit of both interests. Many of the methods required for huge manufacturing facilities are the same in a backyard garage, just on a smaller scale. Even in what the average "layman" assumes is a highly automated manufacturing process, folks may be surprised at how much human hands are involved. That is especially the case in our older vintage cars. For example, the body panels of our late 1940's and 1950's cars were not necessarily one piece stampings. Where they were joined together, there were flanged edges for an even "overlap." However, especially in non-cosmetic areas, once you strip away the "leaded" seams (or body filler), you often find hammer marks where the seams were hand-peened together. Sometimes these overlaps will be as much as a half inch. The key is to seal them up from moisture and exposure to oxygen (air).

So, my encouragement to you is to keep welding, massaging, forming, drilling, fastening, and banging away! You are making great progress! There is no "assembly line speed," to worry about...no supervisor to pick at you, no union boss to suck up to, or any other deadline, except to one you set for yourself.:!: For undercoat or sealer, I suggest you consult with a reputable supplier of auto finishing and paint. I have been out of the industry for over a decade now and I'm pretty sure new products have probably come along. A good supplier will want you to succeed as it reflects back to their success. If they can't answer your questions, they probably can refer you to someone who can.

When you're done...I want a ride!:cheers:

8E45E
07-07-2018, 08:49 AM
However, especially in non-cosmetic areas, once you strip away the "leaded" seams (or body filler), you often find hammer marks where the seams were hand-peened together. Sometimes these overlaps will be as much as a half inch.
The key is to seal them up from moisture and exposure to oxygen (air).

Good advice! Even factory-finished seams are prone to failure:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5217/5472520727_137b10d03a_b.jpg

Craig

Noxnabaker
07-07-2018, 06:25 PM
I didn't mean to be rude, I'm just a bit picky myself with overlaps & I see your cardboard pieces are just as mine, but when the final plate is tried in place you could (if you want to be as silly & picky as me(!)) trim off a wee bit more, I'm just nervous about rust between the plates.
& as stated above: sealing in time when still warm & dry is the winner in any case.
& you should see my welds... Not smoth or fancy at all!

r1lark
07-07-2018, 06:55 PM
I didn't mean to be rude, I'm just a bit picky myself with overlaps & I see your cardboard pieces are just as mine, but when the final plate is tried in place you could (if you want to be as silly & picky as me(!)) trim off a wee bit more, I'm just nervous about rust between the plates.
& as stated above: sealing in time when still warm & dry is the winner in any case.
& you should see my welds... Not smoth or fancy at all!

Nox, I didn't take your comments as rude at all! I wish I could do all the welds as butt welds but it would take me twice as long (and it takes me a long time as it is :)).

John Clary, thanks for the encouragement. The seams are definitely getting seam sealer, inside and outside. And on the outside, there will be undercoating over that.

I used some 3M/Dynatron seam sealer today but didn't like it. It skims over so quickly that the time to smooth it out is very very limited. Anyone have any good seam sealer recommendations?

Colgate Studebaker
07-08-2018, 11:44 AM
I've used SEM in the past and it worked very well. I don't know where you'd get it but it shouldn't be hard to find. Bill

r1lark
07-15-2018, 09:21 AM
Thanks Bill, I'll check into it. My favorite parts store carries the SEM line.

r1lark
07-19-2018, 08:43 PM
Been a little while since I've updated the progress on the Studebaker Rescue '64 Daytona hardtop. Following is a summary with pictures:

Finished the rust repair in the front of the passenger side rear wheelwell, including self etching primer, paint, seam sealer, and undercoating:
73933

73934

Don't know why this following pic is rotated 90 degrees clockwise???
73935

Coated front portion of the inner rear quarter and the floorboards close to it with POR-15 (still have to apply the seam sealer):
73936

Removed passenger side rear quarter window, polished stainless frame, cleaned rust from lower channel and coated with Dupli-Color Rust Fix and painted with Stainless Steel spray paint. Cleaned area between inner and outer passenger side rear quarter (under r/q window), vacuumed out, made sure drains were open, and coated seam with POR-15.......but no pictures of this :(. Cleaned and lubed the passenger side rear quarter window regulator. Removed passenger side r/q window upper retainer, polished, installed my patented new improved catwhisker substitute, and reinstalled:
73937

73938

The passenger side r/q window lower rubber stop was missing, and I didn't have a new one and SI doesn't list them (at least not in the catalog). So.......made one and installed it. Here is the cobbled up one (on right) next to an original on my '62 Daytona hardtop:
73939
Made some 'flathead' bolts (washers welded to the end of a 1/4"-20 bolt and the head cut off, countersunk them into a 1/4" piece of conveyer belt and JB weld epoxied them in, then used 3M super adhesive to glue a larger rubber block to that. Looks a little different, but is the same height & width and works just fine. Here is a pic of it installed in place:
73940

Got some NOS outer r/q catwhiskers with clips so will install the passenger side tomorrow and get the window and regulator back in. Will get some pics of all that.

Next will be to pull the passenger side door window glass, vent window, and regulator........clean and POR-15 the bottom of the door, replace window rollers, clean/lube, and reinstall everything.

studegary
07-19-2018, 09:06 PM
"Last edited by r1lark; Today at 08:54 PM. Reason: grammer and spelling correction (for studegary)"

If you were doing that for me, then you should also correct "grammer" (sic) to grammar.

r1lark
07-19-2018, 09:42 PM
That was for you Gary :).

Usually I just correct spellin'........................

Noxnabaker
07-20-2018, 02:26 AM
Making my own stuff is what I also do many times, nice to see your solutions! :)