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View Full Version : I got a spanking today!



jclary
04-21-2017, 11:45 PM
Spanked by my wife's 2011 Toyota Camry. Much of today's problems were "self inflicted." I began the day with my normal chores, feeding my animals, spraying a little ant poison on last nights fire ant eruptions. Then, I spent a leisure amount of time gathering tools to finally get around to replacing the brake pads on the Camry. I have had the pads for about a month, but the project kept getting postponed. Today would be the day. Although I have never done a brake job on a Toyota, I have done many on other vehicles. In fact, just before the trip for the York swap meet, I had done the same for my Dodge Ram. Must've done it well, 'cause it made that trip in great fashion, and more miles since. So far, it has stopped every time I tried.:)

Buoyed by that successful job, how difficult could a little ol' Camry be????;) So, after I positioned my stash of tools, and supplies, I dragged one of my favorite cruise-in chairs over into the shade, sat down with a bottle of ice water, opened my trusty Chilton's Manual, and began to read. Seemed pretty simple. By this time, it was about noon. After jacking & supporting the car securely. I removed the wheel and got busy. Following the instructions, I was able to remove the caliper, & support it to not harm the flex hose. The pads came off OK, and I laid them out in order to use as an installation/orientation guide for the new pads.:)

This car is in the 80,000 mile range, & this is the first brake job. The pads still had a few miles to go, and the rotors look great, no grooves or warping. After cleaning up everything with brake cleaner, I took a little time for lunch. Now, it became time to install the new pads. Piece of cake...right?:yeahright: Well...there's all these little "gadgets" in a plastic bag.:confused: After laying the things out, it didn't take a lot of time to figure them out. Just a matter of separating them, arranging & focusing on how they were to be oriented. Then came those blasted little "anti-rattle" spring clips!:QQ: #@%%$^$*^*^*!!!!!!:mad: I couldn't believe it!:oops::o:QQ: Determined to not allow those tiny little pieces of bent wire to defeat me!:p:( I would get one pad in place, and while attempting to get the other...the first one would pop out! I made a few trips back to my tool chest for more tools. The pile kept growing. Finally, I got them in, buttoned the wheel up, & staggered into the house for a bathroom break at about 3:30 pm. My wife asked, "Finished with the car?":) (That hurt:QQ:) Then, after I explained the situation...she wounded me even more by asking what a "Brake Shop" would charge?:(

(One of our forum members, 53commander, is a Toyota dealer shop foreman. If he sees this, he'll probably get a good laugh out of it.:lol:)

I explained that was not the point of this exercise. I enjoy car work. I started this job...and I'm gonna finish it!:rolleyes: So, while taking a moment to enjoy my excess blood pressure, I picked up my laptop, typed in a search for replacing brake pads on this model Camry, and about a dozen videos popped up.:) Chilton's Manual or not...I should have done this earlier! Some of these guys are goofier than I am, but, some are also pretty darned good. Almost all, have some practices or methods I wouldn't use, but, just like this forum, there's some valuable things to learn.:)

The next wheel was done in about 30 minutes.:D Not nearly as complicated as I had been trying to make it.;)

Tomorrow...the rear brakes!:cheers:

63 R2 Hawk
04-22-2017, 01:19 AM
The Camry is still quite a easier to R&R pads than the Dunlop non-self centering brakes used on '63 & up Studebakers. Lotta shimming & measuring involved.

8E45E
04-22-2017, 01:20 AM
And you also got spanked a year ago: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?95715-What-a-day!!!&highlight=camry

Craig

DEEPNHOCK
04-22-2017, 07:26 AM
Did you 'rough up' the rotor surface?
Putting new pads on glazed rotors is asking for squeals..

Jeff_H
04-22-2017, 07:34 AM
On line videos are great for DIY repair projects. You can usually find ones on how to as well as how NOT to.

Last fall I did front wheel bearings on my 2006 subaru. I now know why shops charge $500-$700 PER wheel to do that.... A good thing I work for free.

Watched many videos on how to do it but oddly NONE of them showed a few critical steps that I had to figure out myself the "hard" way.

On the other hand, I found one 2yrs ago to take apart my Mom's washer to replace a leaking seal. W/o that video I'd have probably broken something trying to get it apart the wrong way.

SN-60
04-22-2017, 08:41 AM
The very LAST thing an amateur should attempt is brake work.......if not for his own safety, for the safety of other motorists/pedestrians!!! :mad:

jclary
04-22-2017, 08:54 AM
And you also got spanked a year ago: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?95715-What-a-day!!!&highlight=camry

Craig

Yeah Craig, thanks for reminding everybody.;) That was when a loose nut (apparently dropped during assembly), had jammed the trunk lock. Instead of finding the problem, the local dealer had attempted to charge me hundreds of dollars to replace the lock. It wasn't until 53commander (fellow forum member & Toyota mechanic) explained the constraints under which dealer shops have to adhere to, that I began to calm down over the situation. To this day, I remain a bit skeptical, and am reluctant to quickly accept any diagnosis or work from a dealer without very close examination.

The fact that the dealership later called me in to personally apologize, and issue a complete refund, is a good indication they realized their error. One other "spanking" this car has caused me was when trying to replace the radio a few weeks ago. Besides finding a basic radio anymore, just getting to the device requires removing much of the interior. The center dash panel (with two air vents, emergency flasher switch,& clock controls) has to be pried loose. The radio panel, along with the heat & air controls, and the panel below that, which means the gear shift panel has to be loosened or removed.

It's not that all these things are so difficult, but were (for me) so different from past experience & thus, expectations. On the bright side, having difficulty, with these little projects, means I have not had so many problems with this car to become "good at it.":)

It probably wouldn't matter what brand, or kind of car, dealer, or independent garage...all these situations have their special challenges. At my age (72), I know the time is approaching where I will no longer be able to stoop, tumble, and roll around my vehicles with a hand full of wrenches. Until then, I will continue to make the attempt, and sometimes whine about it here on the forum.;)

SN-60
04-22-2017, 08:58 AM
Just let us know when you're 'On The Road'!!!!!!!!! :eek:

studegary
04-22-2017, 11:12 AM
John - When I see a post by you, I read it mostly because of your great writing style, not the technical content contained.

Milaca
04-22-2017, 12:18 PM
This is John "Spanky" Clary as he is pondering his next tactical move regarding Toyota brake replacement.

http://media.giphy.com/media/88EvfARM1YaCQ/giphy.gif

jclary
04-22-2017, 01:21 PM
This is John "Spanky" Clary as he is pondering his next tactical move regarding Toyota brake replacement.

http://media.giphy.com/media/88EvfARM1YaCQ/giphy.gif

Thanks Milaca...got a kick outta that.:) Growing up, I got called much more than a "Little Rascal!";) Having an enormous curiosity, combined with an overabundance of mischief, made life interesting (an intentional understatement).

The rear brakes are done! A piece of cake! Although, slow if I were trying to make a living doing it. Slow, because of being meticulous to detail and not carelessly slathering crud & lube all over the rotors like some of the video's I watched. Another thing that bothered me about the videos. Many of the guys used screwdrivers and pry-bars against the rotors to push the calipers back. As tough as rotors are, I don't like the idea of using them for lateral leverage. Already, they are prone to warping without giving them assistance in doing so. Jeff Rice asked about scuffing the glaze on the rotors, which I do for discs & drums. However, not one of the videos I watched addressed that. Could it be due to the more modern metalic make-up of brake pad material? I don't have the answer to that. The test drive went well.:)

As far as my "technical" qualifications...besides my upbringing, where I was introduced to mechanical gearing, in grandpa's watch shop, (he died in 1951), I spent years observing my elders, fetching tools, assisting, and learning how things worked, & how to repair stuff. When I entered the Air Force, I wanted the motor pool. However, they said I was needed in a more complicated/critical field. Aircraft support equipment, instrumentation, etc. That included all types of engines, hydraulics, pneumatics, refrigeration, and a whole host of additional electrical & electronic equipment.

Later on, after college, I supplied equipment and systems to many industrial customers. Related to brakes, included manufacturers of brakes for domestic passenger cars, rail cars, commercial trucks, aircraft(Rockwell), railroad(Westinghouse), and competitive racing. So...just because I am humble enough to write a silly little self deprecating story on this forum...don't mean I have no business repairing my Toyota.;)

53commander
04-22-2017, 08:57 PM
(One of our forum members, 53commander, is a Toyota dealer shop foreman. If he sees this, he'll probably get a good laugh out of it.:lol:)


:lol: Think of it like this though, a Camry brake job is as easy for me as a lot of things on Studes are for you. I spent darn near two full weekends just trying to get my king pins back together. One hint on the back brakes, make sure the new pads slide onto the brackets nice and easy. The back pads always seem to seize up on the brackets and wear unevenly on those. I usually clean up everything with a wire brush but sometimes you have to pop off the metal clips and smooth everything out with a file. If your rear pads are original also at 80K then I would say everything is in good shape. We usually do brakes on those at around 30 to 40K.

jclary
04-22-2017, 09:27 PM
:lol: Think of it like this though, a Camry brake job is as easy for me as a lot of things on Studes are for you. I spent darn near two full weekends just trying to get my king pins back together. One hint on the back brakes, make sure the new pads slide onto the brackets nice and easy. The back pads always seem to seize up on the brackets and wear unevenly on those. I usually clean up everything with a wire brush but sometimes you have to pop off the metal clips and smooth everything out with a file. If your rear pads are original also at 80K then I would say everything is in good shape. We usually do brakes on those at around 30 to 40K.

Thanks for commenting. Your post is reassuring.:) The rear pads had a little over 1/4 inch of material remaining and were very evenly worn. They were the original pads. I was able to remove them without any prying or hammering. One of the first instructions I gave to the service department upon buying this car, was to never top off the brake fluid. Later, when I began using a local independent service for oil change, I gave the same instructions. I use brake fluid level as a quick & easy wear indicator. Once I completed the brake job, the fluid was clean/clear, and exactly at the "Max" line like the day I bought the car.
After I finished, I did a little three or four mile test drive. The wheels stayed on and the car stopped great every time I tried. Later, this evening, it was my turn to take care of the evening meal. So, on the way to the restaurant:rolleyes:,(a 14 mile round trip) for "carry out," the brakes performed great! I even did a couple of "hands off the steering wheel" stops. Very smooth with no shake & shimmy. If my careful lube placement was done correctly, hopefully there will not be any seizing up for a reasonable period.

That's another point about the videos. One guy, seemed to be doing a pretty good job. Until he began talking about greasing the slides. He held up a tube of regular old "chassis" lube. A big no no. Using a petroleum based grease is asking for trouble. Disc brakes require a synthetic high temp lube.

Colgate Studebaker
04-22-2017, 10:58 PM
John, once again your wit and wisdom have made my day. Keep it up! Thanks, Bill.

jbjr
04-25-2017, 06:09 PM
John, spent the last couple of days doing the brakes as well as a wheel hub and replacing a rear caliper on my wife's 08 T/C. The has been a scraping noise while driving down the road and it is still there after replacing everything that needed to be replaced. The rear brakes have the screw in type pistons and getting the e-brake off to replace was fun.

toymobile
04-26-2017, 10:45 AM
John, spent the last couple of days doing the brakes as well as a wheel hub and replacing a rear caliper on my wife's 08 T/C. The has been a scraping noise while driving down the road and it is still there after replacing everything that needed to be replaced. The rear brakes have the screw in type pistons and getting the e-brake off to replace was fun.

I use a pair of side cutters to grip the cable and pry away from bracket, use the same thing to replace only use another pair of pliers to support the side cutters,works good for me.

Johnny